70

Can any one help me sort a 2 dimensional Array in JavaScript?

It will have data in the following format:

[12, AAA]
[58, BBB]
[28, CCC]
[18, DDD]

It should look like this when sorted:

[12, AAA]
[18, DDD]
[28, CCC]
[58, BBB]

So basically, sorting by the first column.

Cheers

  • 2
    Here's everything you need to know: MDN - Array.sort() – jahroy Apr 19 '13 at 4:52
  • 1
    please accept the answer of @PramodVemulapalli, all those currently high-voted are wrong! – Bergi Jun 6 '14 at 8:55
  • @jahroy: It's not about the type coercion, it's about the requirements for consistent comparison functions. – Bergi Jun 6 '14 at 9:13
93

It's this simple:

var a = [[12, 'AAA'], [58, 'BBB'], [28, 'CCC'],[18, 'DDD']];

a.sort(sortFunction);

function sortFunction(a, b) {
    if (a[0] === b[0]) {
        return 0;
    }
    else {
        return (a[0] < b[0]) ? -1 : 1;
    }
}

I invite you to read the documentation.

If you want to sort by the second column, you can do this:

a.sort(compareSecondColumn);

function compareSecondColumn(a, b) {
    if (a[1] === b[1]) {
        return 0;
    }
    else {
        return (a[1] < b[1]) ? -1 : 1;
    }
}
  • 4
    Please actually test your code. jsfiddle.net/DuR4B/2 . Straight from the documentation link you posted: "If compareFunction is not supplied, elements are sorted by converting them to strings and comparing strings in lexicographic ("dictionary" or "telephone book," not numerical) order. For example, "80" comes before "9" in lexicographic order, but in a numeric sort 9 comes before 80." – Ian Apr 19 '13 at 4:43
  • 3
    @Ian - You're right. Good point. I guess I got over-excited to prove a point about simplicity. I did test it, but not completely. Now I'll fix it... I wish the sample data had proven your point before I smeared that egg all over my face! – jahroy Apr 19 '13 at 4:47
  • Haha I know I know, I hate when that kind of thing happens. It looks so right but something internally changes it that doesn't do as expected. Kinda like comparing strings with < or >. Anyways, I like the update :) – Ian Apr 19 '13 at 4:54
  • 1
    @Ash - The best place to look is the documentation. I like Mozilla's documentation, so when I have a question about a JS function I always google "mdn {{function_name}}." In this case the search term would be "mdn array.sort" which brings you here. – jahroy Aug 7 '15 at 3:32
  • 1
    ... as you'll see in the documentation, the array.sort() method takes a function as an argument, which is fairly common in JavaScript. The array.sort() method is designed in a way that it knows what to do with the function passed to it: it uses it to compare its elements. Here's a really lame fiddle I made to try to demonstrate how you pass functions as references... sorry it's so bad. – jahroy Aug 7 '15 at 3:47
56

The best approach would be to use the following, as there may be repetitive values in the first column.

var arr = [[12, 'AAA'], [12, 'BBB'], [12, 'CCC'],[28, 'DDD'], [18, 'CCC'],[12, 'DDD'],[18, 'CCC'],[28, 'DDD'],[28, 'DDD'],[58, 'BBB'],[68, 'BBB'],[78, 'BBB']];

arr.sort(function(a,b) {
    return a[0]-b[0]
});
  • This is correct answer, it takes into consideration both digits in the number . Thanks! – nick Jun 2 '15 at 16:53
44

try this

//WITH FIRST COLUMN
arr = arr.sort(function(a,b) {
    return a[0] - b[0];
});


//WITH SECOND COLUMN
arr = arr.sort(function(a,b) {
    return a[1] - b[1];
});

Note: Original answer used a greater than (>) instead of minus (-) which is what the comments are referring to as incorrect.

  • 8
    8 upvotes for a blatantly wrong solution? I cannot believe this. Please, read about comparison functions and understand when they need to return negative values. – Bergi Jun 6 '14 at 8:53
  • 6
    As Bergi stated, this is not the right solution. While it may work in many cases, there will be times where it won't work as expected and you're left scratching your head (it has happened to me). The crux of the problem is that the comparison function in this solution only returns two states (true/1, false/0), but it should be returning three states (zero, greater than zero, and less than zero). – thdoan May 6 '15 at 4:08
  • 1
    Did not work for me. @jahroy is the man with the correct answer – erdomester Jul 24 '16 at 13:03
  • Just a note for those reading the comments: The answer was corrected Jan 5. It is correct now (the compare function returns three possible states). – marlar Feb 15 '17 at 20:19
  • @Bergi, thank you for pointing this out. (for me, it doesn't work properly in IE11) and I was not able to understand (why it works in chrome) until I've seen your comment. Thanks! – Alex Nevsky Mar 15 '17 at 10:15
8

If you're anything like me, you won't want to go through changing each index every time you want to change the column you're sorting by.

function sortByColumn(a, colIndex){

    a.sort(sortFunction);

    function sortFunction(a, b) {
        if (a[colIndex] === b[colIndex]) {
            return 0;
        }
        else {
            return (a[colIndex] < b[colIndex]) ? -1 : 1;
        }
    }

    return a;
}

var sorted_a = sortByColumn(a, 2);
  • I just saw your answer, after drafting an answer myself with the exact same reasoning - with a small difference - I actually return the function to sort directly. – olamotte Apr 5 '17 at 21:20
7

Using the arrow function, and sorting by the second string field

var a = [[12, 'CCC'], [58, 'AAA'], [57, 'DDD'], [28, 'CCC'],[18, 'BBB']];
a.sort((a, b) => a[1].localeCompare(b[1]));
console.log(a)

3

Nothing special, just saving the cost it takes to return a value at certain index from an array.

function sortByCol(arr, colIndex){
    arr.sort(sortFunction)
    function sortFunction(a, b) {
        a = a[colIndex]
        b = b[colIndex]
        return (a === b) ? 0 : (a < b) ? -1 : 1
    }
}
// Usage
var a = [[12, 'AAA'], [58, 'BBB'], [28, 'CCC'],[18, 'DDD']]
sortByCol(a, 0)
console.log(JSON.stringify(a))
// "[[12,"AAA"],[18,"DDD"],[28,"CCC"],[58,"BBB"]]"
  • How is this answer different from mine here? – Charles Clayton Feb 22 '17 at 18:32
  • 1
    1. you are using a[colIndex] again and again but I am catching it here a = a[colIndex]. It's more efficient. 2. I am using different flavor of if, making it more shorter. 3. I am not returning arr as a result of sortByCol function which means my function can't be use to create another reference. Hope it helps! – Vikas Gautam Feb 22 '17 at 21:28
0

As my usecase involves dozens of columns, I expanded @jahroy's answer a bit. (also just realized @charles-clayton had the same idea.)
I pass the parameter I want to sort by, and the sort function is redefined with the desired index for the comparison to take place on.

var ID_COLUMN=0
var URL_COLUMN=1

findings.sort(compareByColumnIndex(URL_COLUMN))

function compareByColumnIndex(index) {
  return function(a,b){
    if (a[index] === b[index]) {
        return 0;
    }
    else {
        return (a[index] < b[index]) ? -1 : 1;
    }
  }
}
0

Standing on the shoulders of charles-clayton and @vikas-gautam, I added the string test which is needed if a column has strings as in OP.

return isNaN(a-b) ? (a === b) ? 0 : (a < b) ? -1 : 1 : a-b  ;

The test isNaN(a-b) determines if the strings cannot be coerced to numbers. If they can then the a-b test is valid.

Note that sorting a column of mixed types will always give an entertaining result as the strict equality test (a === b) will always return false. See MDN here

This is the full script with Logger test - using Google Apps Script.

function testSort(){

function sortByCol(arr, colIndex){
    arr.sort(sortFunction);
    function sortFunction(a, b) {
        a = a[colIndex];
        b = b[colIndex];
       return isNaN(a-b) ? (a === b) ? 0 : (a < b) ? -1 : 1 : a-b  ;  // test if text string - ie cannot be coerced to numbers.
       // Note that sorting a column of mixed types will always give an entertaining result as the strict equality test will always return false
       // see https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Equality_comparisons_and_sameness

       }
}
// Usage
var a = [ [12,'12', 'AAA'],
          [12,'11', 'AAB'],
          [58,'120', 'CCC'],
          [28,'08', 'BBB'],
          [18,'80', 'DDD'],
        ]
    var arr1 = a.map(function (i){return i;}).sort();  // use map to ensure tests are not corrupted by a sort in-place.

    Logger.log("Original unsorted:\n     " + JSON.stringify(a));
    Logger.log("Vanilla sort:\n     " + JSON.stringify(arr1));
    sortByCol(a, 0);
    Logger.log("By col 0:\n     " + JSON.stringify(a));
    sortByCol(a, 1);
    Logger.log("By col 1:\n     " + JSON.stringify(a));
    sortByCol(a, 2);
    Logger.log("By col 2:\n     " + JSON.stringify(a));

/* vanilla sort returns " [
                            [12,"11","AAB"],
                            [12,"12","AAA"],
                            [18,"80","DDD"],
                            [28,"08","BBB"],
                            [58,"120","CCC"]
                          ]
   if col 0 then returns "[
                            [12,'12',"AAA"],
                            [12,'11', 'AAB'],
                            [18,'80',"DDD"],
                            [28,'08',"BBB"],
                            [58,'120',"CCC"]
                          ]"
   if col 1 then returns "[
                            [28,'08',"BBB"],
                            [12,'11', 'AAB'],
                            [12,'12',"AAA"],
                            [18,'80',"DDD"],
                            [58,'120',"CCC"],

                          ]"
   if col 2 then returns "[
                            [12,'12',"AAA"],
                            [12,'11', 'AAB'],
                            [28,'08',"BBB"],
                            [58,'120',"CCC"],
                            [18,'80',"DDD"],
                          ]"
*/

}

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