9

I'm defining a macrodef in Ant, and using javascript to do the work. In this case I'm validating a timezone.

<macrodef name="validateTimeZone">
    <attribute name="zone" />
    <sequential>
        <echo>result: ${envTZResult}</echo>
        <echo>  validating timezone: @{zone}</echo>
        <script language="javascript"><![CDATA[
            importClass(java.util.TimeZone);
            importClass(java.util.Arrays);
            var tz = project.getProperty("zone");
            println("    got attribute: " + tz);
            var result = Arrays.asList(TimeZone.getAvailableIDs()).contains(tz); //testing if timezone is known
            project.setProperty("zoneIsValid", result);
        ]]> 
        </script>
    </sequential>
</macrodef>

The problem is project.getProperty() doesn't retrieve values of passed attributes. Does somebody know how you could get the value of the attribute from within the javascript?

1

2 Answers 2

13

Turns out I was using the wrong type of tag. For using scripting to define an ant task, I should have used scriptdef and not macrodef. With scriptdef there are predefined objects to access the attributes and nested elements in your task.

This works for accessing attributes from javascript in Ant:

<scriptdef name="validateTimeZone" language="javascript">
    <attribute name="zone" />
    <![CDATA[
        importClass(java.util.TimeZone);
        importClass(java.util.Arrays);
        var tz = attributes.get("zone"); //get attribute defined for scriptdef
        println("    got attribute: " + tz);
        var result = Arrays.asList(TimeZone.getAvailableIDs()).contains(tz); //testing if timezone is known
        project.setProperty("zoneIsValid", result);
    ]]> 
</scriptdef>
9

Best is to create a property with attribute as value, i.e.

<macrodef name="validateTimeZone">
    <attribute name="zone" />
    <sequential>
        <echo>result: ${envTZResult}</echo>
        <echo>  validating timezone: @{zone}</echo>
        <!-- edit use local with ant 1.8.x -->
        <local name="zone"/>
        <property name="zone" value="@{zone}"/>
        <script language="javascript"><![CDATA[
            importClass(java.util.TimeZone);
            importClass(java.util.Arrays);
            var tz = project.getProperty("zone");
            println("    got attribute: " + tz);
            var result = Arrays.asList(TimeZone.getAvailableIDs()).contains(tz); //testing if timezone is known
            project.setProperty("zoneIsValid", result);
        ]]> 
        </script>
    </sequential>
</macrodef>
2
  • 2
    It's a nice idea, but unfortunately only works for the first invocation. Properties can only be set once in Ant, so after the first run the 'zone' property will always hold the same value.
    – Tim
    Apr 21, 2013 at 22:12
  • 4
    Sure, but with Ant 1.8 >= you can use the local task, see edit
    – Rebse
    Apr 22, 2013 at 19:46

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