24

I have sample code to compare processing time for Parallel approach and Task approach. The goal of this experiment is understanding of how do they work.

So my questions are:

  1. Why Parallel worked faster then Task?
  2. Do my results mean that I should use Parallel instead of Task?
  3. Where should I use Task and where Parallel?
  4. What benefits of using Task in comparison to Parallel?
  5. Does Task is just a wrap for ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem method?

        public Task SomeLongOperation()
        {
            return Task.Delay(3000);
        }
    
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Program p = new Program();
            List<Task> tasks = new List<Task>();
    
            tasks.Add(Task.Factory.StartNew(() => p.SomeLongOperation()));
            tasks.Add(Task.Factory.StartNew(() => p.SomeLongOperation()));
    
            var arr = tasks.ToArray();
    
            Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            Task.WaitAll(arr);
            Console.WriteLine("Task wait all results: " + sw.Elapsed);
            sw.Stop();
    
            sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            Parallel.Invoke(() => p.SomeLongOperation(), () => p.SomeLongOperation());
            Console.WriteLine("Parallel invoke results: " + sw.Elapsed);
            sw.Stop();
    
            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    

Here are my processing results: results

EDIT:

Changed code to look like this:

    Program p = new Program();
    Task[] tasks = new Task[2];

    Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    tasks[0] = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => p.SomeLongOperation());
    tasks[1] = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => p.SomeLongOperation());

    Task.WaitAll(tasks);
    Console.WriteLine("Task wait all results: " + sw.Elapsed);
    sw.Stop();

    sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    Parallel.Invoke(() => p.SomeLongOperation(), () => p.SomeLongOperation());
    Console.WriteLine("Parallel invoke results: " + sw.Elapsed);
    sw.Stop();

My new results:

new results

EDIT 2: When I replaced code with Parallel.Invoke to be first and Task.WaitAll to be second the situation has been changed cardinally. Now Parallel is slower. It makes me think of incorrectness of my estimates. I changed code to look like this:

Program p = new Program();
Task[] tasks = new Task[2];

Stopwatch sw = null;
for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    Parallel.Invoke(() => p.SomeLongOperation(), () => p.SomeLongOperation());
    string res = sw.Elapsed.ToString();
    Console.WriteLine("Parallel invoke results: " + res);
    sw.Stop();
}

for (int i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
    sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    tasks[0] = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => p.SomeLongOperation());
    tasks[1] = Task.Factory.StartNew(() => p.SomeLongOperation());
    Task.WaitAll(tasks);
    string res2 = sw.Elapsed.ToString();
    Console.WriteLine("Task wait all results: " + res2);
    sw.Stop();
}

And here are my new results:

enter image description here

enter image description here

Now I can suggest that this experiment is much more clear. The results are almost the same. Sometimes Parallel and sometimes Task is faster. Now my questions are:

1. Where should I use Task and where Parallel?

2. What benefits of using Task in comparison to Parallel?

3. Does Task is just a wrap for ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem method?

Any helpful info that can clarify those questions are welcome.

  • 2
    tasks.Add(Task.Factory.StartNew(() => p.SomeLongOperation())); already started, but at that point your stopwatch has not started counting yet! – David Apr 19 '13 at 9:53
  • How should I change the code to make this experiment more clear? – Igor Lozovsky Apr 19 '13 at 9:58
  • Move it above the startnew() – David Apr 19 '13 at 10:01
  • BTW: you can call sw.Elapsed.Ticks or sw.Elapsed.TotalMilliseconds, instead of 'sw.Elapsed', the preceding 00:00... is not helpful. – David Apr 19 '13 at 10:02
  • I moved startnew method above tasks.Add(...). Now tasks much more slower then it was. – Igor Lozovsky Apr 19 '13 at 10:05
7

EDIT as of this article from MSDN:

Both Parallel and Task are wrappers for ThreadPool. Parallel invoke also awaits until all tasks will be finished.

Related to your questions:

Using Task, Parallel or ThreadPool depends on the granularity of control you need to have on the execution of your parallel tasks. I'm personally got used to Task.Factory.StartNew(), but that's a personal opinion. The same relates to ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem()

Additional Information: The first call to Parallel.Invoke() and Task.Factory.StartNew() might be slower due to internal initialization.

  • My results are always almost the same. Task.WaitAll is slower then Parallel.Invoke in any way. Perhaps I don't understand something or such comparison is incorrect. Any way I would like to get answers to my questions to clarify those approaches. I think answers to my questions will be useful for others too. – Igor Lozovsky Apr 19 '13 at 10:52
  • Just for information: How much time takes SomeLongOperation()? – Stephen Reindl Apr 19 '13 at 11:02
  • 1
    looking at this MSDN article it says: "... Internally, Parallel.Invoke creates new tasks and waits for them. It uses methods of the Task class to do this. Here's an example. ..." – Stephen Reindl Apr 19 '13 at 11:09
  • According to this article my test cases are the same. Thank you for your help. If you find all answers to my questions, please edit your answer so I can mark it as correct. – Igor Lozovsky Apr 19 '13 at 11:20
  • Please edit your answer => method StartNew instead of StartNow. Both Parallel and Task are wrappers for ThreadPool. Parallel invoke also awaits until all tasks will be finished. – Igor Lozovsky Apr 19 '13 at 11:50
3

If you start nongeneric Tasks(i.e. "void Tasks without a return value") and immediately Wait for them, use Parallel.Invoke instead. Your intent is immediately clear to the reader.

Use Tasks if:

  • you do not Wait immediately
  • you need return values
  • you need to give parameters to the methods called
  • you require TaskCreationOptions functionality
  • you require CancellationToken or TaskScheduler functionality and don't want to use ParallelOptions
  • basically, if you want more options or control

Yes, you can get around some of these, e.g. Parallel.Invoke(() => p.OpWithToken(CancellationToken) but that obfuscates your intent. Parallel.Invoke is for doing a bunch of work using as much CPU power as possible. It gets done, it doesn't deadlock, and you know this in advance.


Your testing is horrid though. The red flag would be that your long action is to wait 3000 milliseconds, yet your tests take less than a tenth of a millisecond.

Task.Factory.StartNew(() => p.SomeLongOperation());

StartNew takes an Action, and executes this in a new main Task. The action () => SomeLongOperation() creates a subtask Task. After this subtask is created (not completed), the call to SomeLongOperation() returns, and the Action is done. So the main Task is already completed after a tenth millisecond, while the two subtasks you have no reference to are still running in the background. The Parallel path also creates two subtasks, which it doesn't track at all, and returns.

The correct way would be tasks[0] = p.SomeLongOperation();, which assigns a running task to the array. Then WaitAll checks for the finishing of this task.

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