I wrote a below Singleton class. I am not sure whether this is thread safe singleton class or not?

public class CassandraAstyanaxConnection {

    private static CassandraAstyanaxConnection _instance;
    private AstyanaxContext<Keyspace> context;
    private Keyspace keyspace;
    private ColumnFamily<String, String> emp_cf;



    public static synchronized CassandraAstyanaxConnection getInstance() {
        if (_instance == null) {
            _instance = new CassandraAstyanaxConnection();
        }
        return _instance;
    }

    /**
     * Creating Cassandra connection using Astyanax client
     *
     */
    private CassandraAstyanaxConnection() {

        context = new AstyanaxContext.Builder()
        .forCluster(ModelConstants.CLUSTER)
        .forKeyspace(ModelConstants.KEYSPACE)
        .withAstyanaxConfiguration(new AstyanaxConfigurationImpl()      
            .setDiscoveryType(NodeDiscoveryType.RING_DESCRIBE)
        )
        .withConnectionPoolConfiguration(new ConnectionPoolConfigurationImpl("MyConnectionPool")
            .setPort(9160)
            .setMaxConnsPerHost(1)
            .setSeeds("127.0.0.1:9160")
        )
        .withAstyanaxConfiguration(new AstyanaxConfigurationImpl()      
            .setCqlVersion("3.0.0")
            .setTargetCassandraVersion("1.2"))
        .withConnectionPoolMonitor(new CountingConnectionPoolMonitor())
        .buildKeyspace(ThriftFamilyFactory.getInstance());

        context.start();
        keyspace = context.getEntity();

        emp_cf = ColumnFamily.newColumnFamily(
            ModelConstants.COLUMN_FAMILY, 
            StringSerializer.get(), 
            StringSerializer.get());
    }

    /**
     * returns the keyspace
     * 
     * @return
     */
    public Keyspace getKeyspace() {
        return keyspace;
    }

    public ColumnFamily<String, String> getEmp_cf() {
        return emp_cf;
    }
}

Can anyone help me with this? Any thoughts on my above Singleton class will be of great help.

Updated Code:-

I am trying to incorporate Bohemian suggestion in my code. Here is the updated code, I got-

public class CassandraAstyanaxConnection {
    private static class ConnectionHolder {
        static final CassandraAstyanaxConnection connection = new CassandraAstyanaxConnection();
    }
    public static CassandraAstyanaxConnection getInstance() {
        return ConnectionHolder.connection;
    }
    /**
     * Creating Cassandra connection using Astyanax client
     *
     */
    private CassandraAstyanaxConnection() {
        context = new AstyanaxContext.Builder()
        .forCluster(ModelConstants.CLUSTER)
        .forKeyspace(ModelConstants.KEYSPACE)
        .withAstyanaxConfiguration(new AstyanaxConfigurationImpl()      
        .setDiscoveryType(NodeDiscoveryType.RING_DESCRIBE)
                )
                .withConnectionPoolConfiguration(new ConnectionPoolConfigurationImpl("MyConnectionPool")
                .setPort(9160)
                .setMaxConnsPerHost(1)
                .setSeeds("127.0.0.1:9160")
                        )
                        .withAstyanaxConfiguration(new AstyanaxConfigurationImpl()      
                        .setCqlVersion("3.0.0")
                        .setTargetCassandraVersion("1.2"))
                        .withConnectionPoolMonitor(new CountingConnectionPoolMonitor())
                        .buildKeyspace(ThriftFamilyFactory.getInstance());
        context.start();
        keyspace = context.getEntity();
        emp_cf = ColumnFamily.newColumnFamily(
                ModelConstants.COLUMN_FAMILY, 
                StringSerializer.get(), 
                StringSerializer.get());
    }
    /**
     * returns the keyspace
     * 
     * @return
     */
    public Keyspace getKeyspace() {
        return keyspace;
    }
    public ColumnFamily<String, String> getEmp_cf() {
        return emp_cf;
    }
}

Can anyone take a look and let me know if this time I got it right or not?

Thanks for the help.

migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Apr 19 '13 at 13:52

This question came from our site for professionals, academics, and students working within the systems development life cycle.

up vote 186 down vote accepted

You are implementing the lazy initialization pattern - where the instance is created when first used.

But there is a simple trick that allows you to code a threadsafe implementation that doesn't require synchronization! It is known as the Initialization-on-demand holder idiom, and it looks like this:

public class CassandraAstyanaxConnection {

    private CassandraAstyanaxConnection(){ }        

    private static class Holder {
       private static final CassandraAstyanaxConnection INSTANCE = new CassandraAstyanaxConnection();
    }

    public static CassandraAstyanaxConnection getInstance() {
        return Holder.INSTANCE;
    }
    // rest of class omitted
}

This code initializes the instance on the first calling of getInstance(), and importantly doesn't need synchronization because of the contract of the class loader:

  • the class loader loads classes when they are first accessed (in this case Holder's only access is within the getInstance() method)
  • when a class is loaded, and before anyone can use it, all static initializers are guaranteed to be executed (that's when Holder's static block fires)
  • the class loader has its own synchronization built right in that make the above two points guaranteed to be threadsafe

It's a neat little trick that I use whenever I need lazy initialization. You also get the bonus of a final instance, even though it's created lazily. Also note how clean and simple the code is.

Edit: You should set all constructors as private or protected. Setting and empty private constructor will do the work

  • 2
    why would your class be accessed before getInstance is called? have other static methods? – tgkprog Apr 19 '13 at 14:15
  • 2
    @tgkprog I didn;t spell it out (but I have edited to do so). The class whose initialization I'm talking about is the static inner class Holder, not the outer class CassandraAstyanaxConnection. This implementation doesn't change the API, except to remove the synchronized keyword from getInstance(), thus improving performance of access to the instance. – Bohemian Apr 19 '13 at 14:20
  • 2
    Your code is perfect :) And yes, I believe this pattern to be the cleanest, fastest singleton pattern that us threadsafe. You're welcome for the help. Good luck with your IT journey. – Bohemian Apr 19 '13 at 23:51
  • 1
    @Bohemian not necessarily, what if the thing I'm passing in is the context of my application (Android) – bstar55 Aug 7 '15 at 23:30
  • 2
    @w35l3y IMHO it's a false positive and the tool should be configured, or the line marked, to ignore this instance of the rule. The class invoking the constructor is a private inner class, which is part of the class itself. You could do a work around using a factory method: Within Holder do INSTANCE = MyClass.create(); and add private static MyClass create() {return new MyClass();}, but that would be perfunctory; done to sidestep an arbitrary style rule but adding no real value. Better to ignore it. – Bohemian Aug 20 '15 at 23:04

all above methods are eagerly initializing object. how about this. This will help you to initialize ur class lazily. You may have heavy object and you don't want to initialize on startup.

public class MySinglton { 

  private MySinglton (){}

  private static volatile MySinglton s;

  public static MySinglton getInstance(){

   if (s != null ) return s;

    synchronized(MySinglton.class){

     if (s == null ) {

      s = new MySinglton();
     }
  }

  return s;

}

} 
  • 1
    I'm not sure if this article still applies but according to this it's broken: cs.umd.edu/~pugh/java/memoryModel/DoubleCheckedLocking.html – bcoughlan Apr 24 '15 at 13:33
  • 3
    @bcoughlan the volatile keyword will keep it safe :) The link you shared just go through the last section. One of the solution is make ur singleton variable volatile. – Mohammad Adnan Apr 27 '15 at 6:57
  • 2
    this implementation has a public constructor, so anyone can create as many objects as she wishes, so it cannot be considered as a singleton. You let the default public constructor to escape – pkran Feb 29 '16 at 16:42
  • ok. one line to add here.. added private constructor. – Mohammad Adnan Mar 2 '16 at 11:24
  • @MohammadAdnan you are right but it is really easy to omit volatile keyword and in 99.99% of cases it will still work. IMHO it is better to use other patterns that require less code (e.g. enum) – csharpfolk Feb 16 at 9:10

No, its not thread-safe if the values returned on the pulbic methods are changeble objects.

To this class be Thread-safe one way is to change it to be immutable.

To do that, you could change this methods like this:

public Keyspace getKeyspace() {
    // make a copy to prevent external user to modified or ensure that Keyspace is immutable, in that case, you don't have to make a copy
    return new Keyspace( keyspace );
}

public ColumnFamily<String, String> getEmp_cf() {
    // Same principle here. If ColumnFamily is immutable, you don't have to make a copy. If its not, then make a copy
    return new ColumnFamily( emp_cf );
}

In this book Java Concurrency in Practice you can see the principle of that immutability.

As mentiond in this great article here :

The best solution to this problem is [...] to use a static field

public class Singelton {

    private static final Singelton singleObject = new Singelton();

    public Singelton getInstance(){
        return singleObject;
    }
}

No, this does not appear to be thread-safe. It appears that you there is mutable data accessible after the call to getInstance, where the lock would have been released.

I think this will do the same thing without having to check for instance every time. static is the same as check first time

public class Singl {        
    private static Singl _instance;
    //other vars        
    static{
            //synchronized(Singl.class){//do not need
                    _instance = new Singl();
            //}
    }

     public static Singl getInstance() {
             return _instance;

     }

     private Singl(){
             //initizlize
     }

}
  • 2
    I didn't DV but there are few issues here. 1) static init and synchronized are useless: Java VM spec guarantees safety of simple static Singl _instance = new Singl(); 2) you didn't point out that it's eager initialization, as opposed to lazy one that is shown in question – gnat Apr 19 '13 at 13:39
  • this wont be eager. it will happen first time you call getInstance as that is when the class is accessed the first time. or you do a class.forname. ty about static sync. – tgkprog Apr 19 '13 at 14:04
  • 2
    it's eager in the sense that it's not controlled by getInstance invocations. Think of it, you may innocently refer Singl.class and boom! initialization is there, even though you didn't even attempt to invoke getInstance – gnat Apr 19 '13 at 14:22

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