145

Is there any reason to use a <div style="display:inline-block"> instead of a <span> to layout a webpage?

Can I put content nested inside the span? What is valid and what isn't?

It's ok to use this to make a 3x2 table like layout?

<div>
   <span> content1(divs,p, spans, etc) </span>
   <span> content2(divs,p, spans, etc) </span>
   <span> content3(divs,p, spans, etc) </span>
</div>
<div>
   <span> content4(divs,p, spans, etc) </span>
   <span> content5(divs,p, spans, etc) </span>
   <span> content6(divs,p, spans, etc) </span>
</div>
2
  • 18
    If you are going for a valid xhtml document then you cannot put block level elements inside of inline elements.
    – moorej
    Oct 23, 2009 at 3:31
  • 1
    wiki on html elements en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HTML_element
    – moorej
    Oct 23, 2009 at 3:35

6 Answers 6

190

According to the HTML spec, <span> is an inline element and <div> is a block element. Now that can be changed using the display CSS property but there is one issue: in terms of HTML validation, you can't put block elements inside inline elements so:

<p>...<div>foo</div>...</p>

is not strictly valid even if you change the <div> to inline or inline-block.

So, if your element is inline or inline-block use a <span>. If it's a block level element, use a <div>.

7
  • 1
    yeah, you can style a span and make it behave just like a div
    – David
    Oct 23, 2009 at 2:12
  • 1
    I tend to agree that inline-block has a closer relationship to inline than block.
    – Bob Aman
    Oct 23, 2009 at 2:20
  • 11
    The original question asked about what is valid, and for validation, <span> and <div> are indeed different, as <span> is an inline element (valid within a <p>, for instance), while <div> is a block element (not valid within a <p>). Oct 23, 2009 at 3:21
  • 10
    @cletus isn't <p> a block element?
    – Aris
    Jul 25, 2013 at 11:48
  • 10
    <p> is a block element that "cannot contain block-level elements" (link), so whilst the example is invalid it is not because <p> is inline.
    – Pero P.
    Sep 3, 2013 at 17:53
21

If you want to have a valid xhtml document then you cannot put a div inside of a paragraph.

Also, a div with the property display: inline-block works differently than a span. A span is by default an inline element, you cannot set the width, height, and other properties associated with blocks. On the other hand, an element with the property inline-block will still "flow" with any surrounding text but you may set properties such as width, height, etc. A span with the property display:block will not flow in the same way as an inline-block element but will create a carriage return and have default margin.

Note that inline-block is not supported in all browsers. For instance in Firefox 2 and less you must use:

display: -moz-inline-stack;

which displays slightly different than an inline block element in FF3.

There is a great article here on creating cross browser inline-block elements.

3
  • -moz-inline-block does inline-block does not.
    – moorej
    Oct 23, 2009 at 3:07
  • If you want it to display more like inline block in FF3 you should actually use inline-stack as well.
    – moorej
    Oct 23, 2009 at 3:08
  • +1 for the very interesting link. There have been times that inline-block would have solved a number of problems.
    – Tom
    Oct 23, 2009 at 3:50
5
  1. Inline-block is a halfway point between setting an element’s display to inline or to block. It keeps the element in the inline flow of the document like display:inline does, but you can manipulate the element’s box attributes (width, height and vertical margins) like you can with display:block.

  2. We must not use block elements within inline elements. This is invalid and there is no reason to do such practices.

3

I know this Q is old, but why not use all DIVs instead of the SPANs? Then everything plays all happy together.

Example:

<div> 
   <div> content1(divs,p, spans, etc) </div> 
   <div> content2(divs,p, spans, etc) </div> 
   <div> content3(divs,p, spans, etc) </div> 
</div> 
<div> 
   <div> content4(divs,p, spans, etc) </div> 
   <div> content5(divs,p, spans, etc) </div> 
   <div> content6(divs,p, spans, etc) </div> 
</div>
1
  • 1
    I think that the goal is to keep everything as lean and semantic as possible. So if you have a header and you want an inner wrapper div - It might <em>seem</em> more semantic to have: header {} and header span {} then It would to have header {} and .inner {}. However... if you use the .inner, you can use it many times - spans would most likely have to be independently styled. Bottom line - you want to use as little markup as possible - so people are trying to figure out ways to avoid div>div>div>div>div etc. Jan 11, 2013 at 21:24
3

As others have answered… div is a “block element” (now redefined as Flow Content) and span is an “inline element” (Phrasing Content). Yes, you may change the default presentation of these elements, but there is a difference between “flow” versus “block”, and “phrasing” versus “inline”.

An element classified as flow content can only be used where flow content is expected, and an element classified as phrasing content can be used where phrasing content is expected. Since all phrasing content is flow content, a phrasing element can also be used anywhere flow content is expected. The specs provide more detailed info.

All phrasing elements, such as strong and em, can only contain other phrasing elements: you can’t put a table inside a cite for instance. Most flow content such as div and li can contain all types of flow content (as well as phrasing content), but there are a few exceptions: p, pre, and th are examples of non-phrasing flow content (“block elements”) that can only contain phrasing content (“inline elements”). And of course there are the normal element restrictions such as dl and table only being allowed to contain certain elements.

While both div and p are non-phrasing flow content, the div can contain other flow content children (including more divs and ps). On the other hand, p may only contain phrasing content children. That means you can’t put a div inside a p, even though both are non-phrasing flow elements.

Now here’s the kicker. These semantic specifications are unrelated to how the element is displayed. Thus, if you have a div inside a span, you will get a validation error even if you have span {display: block;} and div {display: inline;} in your CSS.

2
  • What about inline-block inside inline and block inside inline-block?
    – user764754
    Sep 24, 2016 at 15:04
  • @user764754 as long as you adhere to the specs, you can style any element as you wish and it will still be valid. (inline-block is a CSS style, not a type of element or content model.)
    – chharvey
    Sep 24, 2016 at 15:08
3

I think it will help you to understand the basic differences between Inline-Elements (e.g. span) and Block-Elements (e.g. div), in order to understand why "display: inline-block" is so useful.

Problem: inline elements (e.g. span, a, button, input etc.) take "margin" only horizontally (margin-left and margin-right) on, not vertically. Vertical spacing works only on block elements (or if "display:block" is set)

Solution: Only through "display: inline-block" will also take the vertical distance (top and bottom). Reason: Inline element Span, behaves now like a block element to the outside, but like an inline element inside

Here Code Examples:

 /* Inlineelement */

        div,
        span {
            margin: 30px;
        }

        span {
            outline: firebrick dotted medium;
            background-color: antiquewhite;
        }

        span.mitDisplayBlock {
            background: #a2a2a2;
            display: block;
            width: 200px;
            height: 200px;
        }

        span.beispielMargin {
            margin: 20px;
        }

        span.beispielMarginDisplayInlineBlock {
            display: inline-block;
        }

        span.beispielMarginDisplayInline {
            display: inline;
        }

        span.beispielMarginDisplayBlock {
            display: block;
        }

        /* Blockelement */

        div {
            outline: orange dotted medium;
            background-color: deepskyblue;
        }

        .paddingDiv {
            padding: 20px;
            background-color: blanchedalmond;
        }

        .marginDivWrapper {
            background-color: aliceblue;

        }

        .marginDiv {
            margin: 20px;
            background-color: blanchedalmond;
        }
    </style>
    <style>
        /* Nur für das w3school Bild */

        #w3_DIV_1 {
            bottom: 0px;
            box-sizing: border-box;
            height: 391px;
            left: 0px;
            position: relative;
            right: 0px;
            text-size-adjust: 100%;
            top: 0px;
            width: 913.984px;
            perspective-origin: 456.984px 195.5px;
            transform-origin: 456.984px 195.5px;
            background: rgb(241, 241, 241) none repeat scroll 0% 0% / auto padding-box border-box;
            border: 2px dashed rgb(187, 187, 187);
            font: normal normal 400 normal 15px / 22.5px Lato, sans-serif;
            padding: 45px;
            transition: all 0.25s ease-in-out 0s;
        }

        /*#w3_DIV_1*/

        #w3_DIV_1:before {
            bottom: 349.047px;
            box-sizing: border-box;
            content: '"Margin"';
            display: block;
            height: 31px;
            left: 0px;
            position: absolute;
            right: 0px;
            text-align: center;
            text-size-adjust: 100%;
            top: 6.95312px;
            width: 909.984px;
            perspective-origin: 454.984px 15.5px;
            transform-origin: 454.984px 15.5px;
            font: normal normal 400 normal 21px / 31.5px Lato, sans-serif;
        }

        /*#w3_DIV_1:before*/

        #w3_DIV_2 {
            bottom: 0px;
            box-sizing: border-box;
            color: black;
            height: 297px;
            left: 0px;
            position: relative;
            right: 0px;
            text-decoration: none solid rgb(255, 255, 255);
            text-size-adjust: 100%;
            top: 0px;
            width: 819.984px;
            column-rule-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);
            perspective-origin: 409.984px 148.5px;
            transform-origin: 409.984px 148.5px;
            caret-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);
            background: rgb(76, 175, 80) none repeat scroll 0% 0% / auto padding-box border-box;
            border: 0px none rgb(255, 255, 255);
            font: normal normal 400 normal 15px / 22.5px Lato, sans-serif;
            outline: rgb(255, 255, 255) none 0px;
            padding: 45px;
        }

        /*#w3_DIV_2*/

        #w3_DIV_2:before {
            bottom: 258.578px;
            box-sizing: border-box;
            content: '"Border"';
            display: block;
            height: 31px;
            left: 0px;
            position: absolute;
            right: 0px;
            text-align: center;
            text-size-adjust: 100%;
            top: 7.42188px;
            width: 819.984px;
            perspective-origin: 409.984px 15.5px;
            transform-origin: 409.984px 15.5px;
            font: normal normal 400 normal 21px / 31.5px Lato, sans-serif;
        }

        /*#w3_DIV_2:before*/

        #w3_DIV_3 {
            bottom: 0px;
            box-sizing: border-box;
            height: 207px;
            left: 0px;
            position: relative;
            right: 0px;
            text-size-adjust: 100%;
            top: 0px;
            width: 729.984px;
            perspective-origin: 364.984px 103.5px;
            transform-origin: 364.984px 103.5px;
            background: rgb(241, 241, 241) none repeat scroll 0% 0% / auto padding-box border-box;
            font: normal normal 400 normal 15px / 22.5px Lato, sans-serif;
            padding: 45px;
        }

        /*#w3_DIV_3*/

        #w3_DIV_3:before {
            bottom: 168.344px;
            box-sizing: border-box;
            content: '"Padding"';
            display: block;
            height: 31px;
            left: 3.64062px;
            position: absolute;
            right: -3.64062px;
            text-align: center;
            text-size-adjust: 100%;
            top: 7.65625px;
            width: 729.984px;
            perspective-origin: 364.984px 15.5px;
            transform-origin: 364.984px 15.5px;
            font: normal normal 400 normal 21px / 31.5px Lato, sans-serif;
        }

        /*#w3_DIV_3:before*/

        #w3_DIV_4 {
            bottom: 0px;
            box-sizing: border-box;
            height: 117px;
            left: 0px;
            position: relative;
            right: 0px;
            text-size-adjust: 100%;
            top: 0px;
            width: 639.984px;
            perspective-origin: 319.984px 58.5px;
            transform-origin: 319.984px 58.5px;
            background: rgb(191, 201, 101) none repeat scroll 0% 0% / auto padding-box border-box;
            border: 2px dashed rgb(187, 187, 187);
            font: normal normal 400 normal 15px / 22.5px Lato, sans-serif;
            padding: 20px;
        }

        /*#w3_DIV_4*/

        #w3_DIV_4:before {
            box-sizing: border-box;
            content: '"Content"';
            display: block;
            height: 73px;
            text-align: center;
            text-size-adjust: 100%;
            width: 595.984px;
            perspective-origin: 297.984px 36.5px;
            transform-origin: 297.984px 36.5px;
            font: normal normal 400 normal 21px / 73.5px Lato, sans-serif;
        }

        /*#w3_DIV_4:before*/
   <h1> The Box model - content, padding, border, margin</h1>
    <h2> Inline element - span</h2>
    <span>Info: A span element can not have height and width (not without "display: block"), which means it takes the fixed inline size </span>

    <span class="beispielMargin">
        <b>Problem:</b> inline elements (eg span, a, button, input etc.) take "margin" only vertically (margin-left and margin-right)
        on, not horizontal. Vertical spacing works only on block elements (or if display: block is set) </span>

    <span class="beispielMarginDisplayInlineBlock">
        <b>Solution</b> Only through
        <b> "display: inline-block" </ b> will also take the vertical distance (top and bottom). Reason: Inline element Span,
        behaves now like a block element to the outside, but like an inline element inside</span>

    <span class="beispielMarginDisplayInline">Example: here "display: inline". See the margin with Inspector!</span>

    <span class="beispielMarginDisplayBlock">Example: here "display: block". See the margin with Inspector!</span>

    <span class="beispielMarginDisplayInlineBlock">Example: here "display: inline-block". See the margin with Inspector! </span>

    <span class="mitDisplayBlock">Only with the "Display" -property and "block" -Value in addition, a width and height can be assigned. "span" is then like
        a "div" block element.  </span>

    <h2>Inline-Element - Div</h2>
    <div> A div automatically takes "display: block." </ div>
    <div class = "paddingDiv"> Padding is for padding </ div>

    <div class="marginDivWrapper">
Wrapper encapsulates the example "marginDiv" to clarify the "margin" (distance from inner element "marginDiv" to the text)
        of the outer element "marginDivWrapper". Here 20px;)
        
    <div class = "marginDiv"> margin is for the margins </ div>
        And there, too, 20px;
    </div>

    <h2>w3school sample image </h2>
    source:
    <a href="https://www.w3schools.com/css/css_boxmodel.asp">CSS Box Model</a>
    <div id="w3_DIV_1">
        <div id="w3_DIV_2">
            <div id="w3_DIV_3">
                <div id="w3_DIV_4">
                </div>
            </div>
        </div>
    </div>

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