260

Does C++ support 'finally' blocks?

What is the RAII idiom?

What is the difference between C++'s RAII idiom and C#'s 'using' statement?

16 Answers 16

262

No, C++ does not support 'finally' blocks. The reason is that C++ instead supports RAII: "Resource Acquisition Is Initialization" -- a poor name for a really useful concept.

The idea is that an object's destructor is responsible for freeing resources. When the object has automatic storage duration, the object's destructor will be called when the block in which it was created exits -- even when that block is exited in the presence of an exception. Here is Bjarne Stroustrup's explanation of the topic.

A common use for RAII is locking a mutex:

// A class with implements RAII
class lock
{
    mutex &m_;

public:
    lock(mutex &m)
      : m_(m)
    {
        m.acquire();
    }
    ~lock()
    {
        m_.release();
    }
};

// A class which uses 'mutex' and 'lock' objects
class foo
{
    mutex mutex_; // mutex for locking 'foo' object
public:
    void bar()
    {
        lock scopeLock(mutex_); // lock object.

        foobar(); // an operation which may throw an exception

        // scopeLock will be destructed even if an exception
        // occurs, which will release the mutex and allow
        // other functions to lock the object and run.
    }
};

RAII also simplifies using objects as members of other classes. When the owning class' is destructed, the resource managed by the RAII class gets released because the destructor for the RAII-managed class gets called as a result. This means that when you use RAII for all members in a class that manage resources, you can get away with using a very simple, maybe even the default, destructor for the owner class since it doesn't need to manually manage its member resource lifetimes. (Thanks to Mike B for pointing this out.)

For those familliar with C# or VB.NET, you may recognize that RAII is similar to .NET deterministic destruction using IDisposable and 'using' statements. Indeed, the two methods are very similar. The main difference is that RAII will deterministically release any type of resource -- including memory. When implementing IDisposable in .NET (even the .NET language C++/CLI), resources will be deterministically released except for memory. In .NET, memory is not deterministically released; memory is only released during garbage collection cycles.

 

† Some people believe that "Destruction is Resource Relinquishment" is a more accurate name for the RAII idiom.

  • 18
    "Destruction is Resource Relinquishment" - DIRR... Nope, doesn't work for me. =P – Erik Forbes Oct 2 '08 at 7:37
  • 13
    RAII is stuck -- there's really no changing it. Trying to do so would be foolish. However, you have to admit though that "Resource Acquisition Is Initialization" is still a pretty poor name. – Kevin Oct 2 '08 at 7:44
  • 155
    SBRM == Scope Bound Resource Management – Johannes Schaub - litb Nov 24 '08 at 21:54
  • 10
    Anyone with the skill to engineer not only software generally, let alone improved techniques, can give no worthy excuse for such a horrendous acronym. – Hardryv Apr 9 '12 at 20:47
  • 50
    This leaves you stuck when you have something to clean up that doesn't match any C++ object's lifetime. I guess you end up with Lifetime Equals C++ Class Liftime Or Else It Gets Ugly (LECCLEOEIGU?). – Warren P Dec 27 '12 at 16:16
76

In C++ the finally is NOT required because of RAII.

RAII moves the responsibility of exception safety from the user of the object to the designer (and implementer) of the object. I would argue this is the correct place as you then only need to get exception safety correct once (in the design/implementation). By using finally you need to get exception safety correct every time you use an object.

Also IMO the code looks neater (see below).

Example:

A database object. To make sure the DB connection is used it must be opened and closed. By using RAII this can be done in the constructor/destructor.

C++ Like RAII

void someFunc()
{
    DB    db("DBDesciptionString");
    // Use the db object.

} // db goes out of scope and destructor closes the connection.
  // This happens even in the presence of exceptions.

The use of RAII makes using a DB object correctly very easy. The DB object will correctly close itself by the use of a destructor no matter how we try and abuse it.

Java Like Finally

void someFunc()
{
    DB      db = new DB("DBDesciptionString");
    try
    {
        // Use the db object.
    }
    finally
    {
        // Can not rely on finaliser.
        // So we must explicitly close the connection.
        try
        {
            db.close();
        }
        catch(Throwable e)
        {
           /* Ignore */
           // Make sure not to throw exception if one is already propagating.
        }
    }
}

When using finally the correct use of the object is delegated to the user of the object. i.e. It is the responsibility of the object user to correctly to explicitly close the DB connection. Now you could argue that this can be done in the finaliser, but resources may have limited availability or other constraints and thus you generally do want to control the release of the object and not rely on the non deterministic behavior of the garbage collector.

Also this is a simple example.
When you have multiple resources that need to be released the code can get complicated.

A more detailed analysis can be found here: http://accu.org/index.php/journals/236

  • 16
    // Make sure not to throw exception if one is already propagating. It is important for C++ destructors not to throw exceptions as well for this very reason. – Cemafor May 23 '13 at 21:28
  • 10
    @Cemafor: The reason for C++ not to throw exceptions out of the destructor is different than Java. In Java it will work (you just loose the original exception). In C++ its really bad. But the point in C++ is that you only have to do it once (by the designer of the class) when he writes the destructor. In Java you have to do it at the point of usage. So it is the responsibility of the user of the class to write the same boiler plate very time. – Martin York May 24 '13 at 0:31
  • 1
    If it's a matter of being "needed", you don't need RAII either. Let's get rid of it! :-) Jokes aside, RAII is fine for a lot cases. What RAII does makes more cumbersome is cases when you want to execute some code (not resource related) even if the code above returned early. For that either you use gotos or separate it into two methods. – Trinidad Nov 9 '14 at 17:30
  • @Trinidad: You are going to have to be a lot more specific than that. You should start a question about situations where RAII is more cumbersome and get some real feedback on the ways that you should be doing it. – Martin York Nov 9 '14 at 18:56
  • 1
    @Trinidad: Its not a simple as you think (as all your suggestions seem to pick the worst options possible). Which is why a question may be a better place to explore this than the comments. – Martin York Nov 10 '14 at 3:34
58

RAII is usually better, but you can have easily the finally semantics in C++. Using a tiny amount of code.

Besides, the C++ Core Guidelines give finally.

Here is a link to the GSL Microsoft implementation and a link to the Martin Moene implementation

Bjarne Stroustrup multiple times said that everything that is in the GSL it meant to go in the standard eventually. So it should be a future-proof way to use finally.

You can easily implement yourself if you want though, continue reading.

In C++11 RAII and lambdas allows to make a general finally:

namespace detail { //adapt to your "private" namespace
template <typename F>
struct FinalAction {
    FinalAction(F f) : clean_{f} {}
   ~FinalAction() { if(enabled_) clean_(); }
    void disable() { enabled_ = false; };
  private:
    F clean_;
    bool enabled_{true}; }; }

template <typename F>
detail::FinalAction<F> finally(F f) {
    return detail::FinalAction<F>(f); }

example of use:

#include <iostream>
int main() {
    int* a = new int;
    auto delete_a = finally([a] { delete a; std::cout << "leaving the block, deleting a!\n"; });
    std::cout << "doing something ...\n"; }

the output will be:

doing something...
leaving the block, deleting a!

Personally I used this few times to ensure to close POSIX file descriptor in a C++ program.

Having a real class that manage resources and so avoids any kind of leaks is usually better, but this finally is useful in the cases where making a class sounds like an overkill.

Besides, I like it better than other languages finally because if used naturally you write the closing code nearby the opening code (in my example the new and delete) and destruction follows construction in LIFO order as usual in C++. The only downside is that you get an auto variable you don't really use and the lambda syntax make it a little noisy (in my example in the fourth line only the word finally and the {}-block on the right are meaningful, the rest is essentially noise).

Another example:

 [...]
 auto precision = std::cout.precision();
 auto set_precision_back = finally( [precision, &std::cout]() { std::cout << std::setprecision(precision); } );
 std::cout << std::setprecision(3);

The disable member is useful if the finally has to be called only in case of failure. For example, you have to copy an object in three different containers, you can setup the finally to undo each copy and disable after all copies are successful. Doing so, if the destruction cannot throw, you ensure the strong guarantee.

disable example:

//strong guarantee
void copy_to_all(BIGobj const& a) {
    first_.push_back(a);
    auto undo_first_push = finally([first_&] { first_.pop_back(); });

    second_.push_back(a);
    auto undo_second_push = finally([second_&] { second_.pop_back(); });

    third_.push_back(a);
    //no necessary, put just to make easier to add containers in the future
    auto undo_third_push = finally([third_&] { third_.pop_back(); });

    undo_first_push.disable();
    undo_second_push.disable();
    undo_third_push.disable(); }

If you cannot use C++11 you can still have finally, but the code becomes a bit more long winded. Just define a struct with only a constructor and destructor, the constructor take references to anything needed and the destructor does the actions you need. This is basically what the lambda does, done manually.

#include <iostream>
int main() {
    int* a = new int;

    struct Delete_a_t {
        Delete_a_t(int* p) : p_(p) {}
       ~Delete_a_t() { delete p_; std::cout << "leaving the block, deleting a!\n"; }
        int* p_;
    } delete_a(a);

    std::cout << "doing something ...\n"; }
  • There might be a possible problem: in function 'finally(F f)' it returns a object of FinalAction, so the deconstructor might be called before returning of function finally. Maybe we should use std::function instead of template F. – user1633272 Dec 1 '16 at 14:05
  • Note that FinalAction is basically the same as the popular ScopeGuard idiom, only with a different name. – anderas May 5 '17 at 8:16
  • 1
    Is this optimization safe? – Nulano Aug 10 '17 at 12:20
  • 2
    @Paolo.Bolzoni Sorry for not replying sooner, I didn't get a notification for your comment. I was worried the finally block (in which I call a DLL function) would be called before the end of the scope (because the variable is unused), but have since found a question on SO that cleared my worries. I would link to it, but unfortunately, I can't find it anymore. – Nulano Sep 24 '17 at 15:10
  • 1
    The disable() function is kind of a wart on your otherwise clean design. If you want the finally to be only called in case of failure, then why not just use catch statement? Isn't that what it's for? – user2445507 Mar 15 at 23:39
30

Beyond making clean up easy with stack-based objects, RAII is also useful because the same 'automatic' clean up occurs when the object is a member of another class. When the owning class is destructed, the resource managed by the RAII class gets cleaned up because the dtor for that class gets called as a result.

This means that when you reach RAII nirvana and all members in a class use RAII (like smart pointers), you can get away with a very simple (maybe even default) dtor for the owner class since it doesn't need to manually manage its member resource lifetimes.

  • That's a very good point. +1 to you. Not many other people have voted you up though. I hope you don't mind that I edited my post to include your comments. (I gave you credit of course.) Thanks! :) – Kevin Oct 2 '08 at 16:22
30

why is it that even managed languages provide a finally-block despite resources being deallocated automatically by the garbage collector anyway?

Actually, languages based on Garbage collectors need "finally" more. A garbage collector does not destroy your objects in a timely manner, so it can not be relied upon to clean up non-memory related issues correctly.

In terms of dynamically-allocated data, many would argue that you should be using smart-pointers.

However...

RAII moves the responsibility of exception safety from the user of the object to the designer

Sadly this is its own downfall. Old C programming habits die hard. When you're using a library written in C or a very C style, RAII won't have been used. Short of re-writing the entire API front-end, that's just what you have to work with. Then the lack of "finally" really bites.

  • 12
    Exactly... RAII seems nice from an ideal perspective. But I have to work with conventional C APIs all the time (like C-style functions in Win32 API...). It's very common to acquire a resource that returns some kind of a HANDLE, which then requires some function like CloseHandle(HANDLE) to clean up. Using try ... finally is a nice way of dealing with possible exceptions. (Thankfully, it looks like shared_ptr with custom deleters and C++11 lambdas should provide some RAII-based relief that doesn't require writing entire classes to wrap some API I only use in one place.). – James Johnston Oct 3 '11 at 18:37
  • 6
    @JamesJohnston, it's very easy to write a wrapper class that holds any kind of handle and provides RAII mechanics. ATL provides a bunch of them for example. It seems that you consider this to be too much trouble but I disagree, they're very small and easy to write. – Mark Ransom Jan 4 '12 at 3:06
  • 5
    Simple yes, small no. Size is dependent on the complexity of the library you're working with. – Philip Couling Jan 4 '12 at 14:20
  • 1
    @MarkRansom: Is there any mechanism via which RAII can do something intelligent if an exception occurs during cleanup while another exception is pending? In systems with try/finally, it's possible--though awkward--to arrange things so that the pending exception and the exception that occurred during cleanup both get stored in a new CleanupFailedException. Is there any plausible way to achieve such a result using RAII? – supercat Nov 30 '12 at 22:36
  • 3
    @couling: There are many cases where a program will call a SomeObject.DoSomething() method and want to know whether it (1) succeeded, (2) failed with no side-effects, (3) failed with side-effects the caller is prepared to cope with, or (4) failed with side-effects the caller cannot cope with. Only the caller is going to know what situations it can and cannot cope with; what the caller needs is a way of knowing what the situation is. It's too bad there's no standard mechanism for supplying the most important information about an exception. – supercat Dec 3 '12 at 20:43
8

Another "finally" block emulation using C++11 lambda functions

template <typename TCode, typename TFinallyCode>
inline void with_finally(const TCode &code, const TFinallyCode &finally_code)
{
    try
    {
        code();
    }
    catch (...)
    {
        try
        {
            finally_code();
        }
        catch (...) // Maybe stupid check that finally_code mustn't throw.
        {
            std::terminate();
        }
        throw;
    }
    finally_code();
}

Let's hope the compiler will optimize the code above.

Now we can write code like this:

with_finally(
    [&]()
    {
        try
        {
            // Doing some stuff that may throw an exception
        }
        catch (const exception1 &)
        {
            // Handling first class of exceptions
        }
        catch (const exception2 &)
        {
            // Handling another class of exceptions
        }
        // Some classes of exceptions can be still unhandled
    },
    [&]() // finally
    {
        // This code will be executed in all three cases:
        //   1) exception was not thrown at all
        //   2) exception was handled by one of the "catch" blocks above
        //   3) exception was not handled by any of the "catch" block above
    }
);

If you wish you can wrap this idiom into "try - finally" macros:

// Please never throw exception below. It is needed to avoid a compilation error
// in the case when we use "begin_try ... finally" without any "catch" block.
class never_thrown_exception {};

#define begin_try    with_finally([&](){ try
#define finally      catch(never_thrown_exception){throw;} },[&]()
#define end_try      ) // sorry for "pascalish" style :(

Now "finally" block is available in C++11:

begin_try
{
    // A code that may throw
}
catch (const some_exception &)
{
    // Handling some exceptions
}
finally
{
    // A code that is always executed
}
end_try; // Sorry again for this ugly thing

Personally I don't like the "macro" version of "finally" idiom and would prefer to use pure "with_finally" function even though a syntax is more bulky in that case.

You can test the code above here: http://coliru.stacked-crooked.com/a/1d88f64cb27b3813

PS

If you need a finally block in your code, then scoped guards or ON_FINALLY/ON_EXCEPTION macros will probably better fit your needs.

Here is short example of usage ON_FINALLY/ON_EXCEPTION:

void function(std::vector<const char*> &vector)
{
    int *arr1 = (int*)malloc(800*sizeof(int));
    if (!arr1) { throw "cannot malloc arr1"; }
    ON_FINALLY({ free(arr1); });

    int *arr2 = (int*)malloc(900*sizeof(int));
    if (!arr2) { throw "cannot malloc arr2"; }
    ON_FINALLY({ free(arr2); });

    vector.push_back("good");
    ON_EXCEPTION({ vector.pop_back(); });

    ...
  • 1
    The first is to me the most readable out of all options presented in this page. +1 – Nikos Oct 18 '18 at 2:20
7

Sorry for digging up such an old thread, but there is a major error in the following reasoning:

RAII moves the responsibility of exception safety from the user of the object to the designer (and implementer) of the object. I would argue this is the correct place as you then only need to get exception safety correct once (in the design/implementation). By using finally you need to get exception safety correct every time you use an object.

More often than not, you have to deal with dynamically allocated objects, dynamic numbers of objects etc. Within the try-block, some code might create many objects (how many is determined at runtime) and store pointers to them in a list. Now, this is not an exotic scenario, but very common. In this case, you'd want to write stuff like

void DoStuff(vector<string> input)
{
  list<Foo*> myList;

  try
  {    
    for (int i = 0; i < input.size(); ++i)
    {
      Foo* tmp = new Foo(input[i]);
      if (!tmp)
        throw;

      myList.push_back(tmp);
    }

    DoSomeStuff(myList);
  }
  finally
  {
    while (!myList.empty())
    {
      delete myList.back();
      myList.pop_back();
    }
  }
}

Of course the list itself will be destroyed when going out of scope, but that wouldn't clean up the temporary objects you have created.

Instead, you have to go the ugly route:

void DoStuff(vector<string> input)
{
  list<Foo*> myList;

  try
  {    
    for (int i = 0; i < input.size(); ++i)
    {
      Foo* tmp = new Foo(input[i]);
      if (!tmp)
        throw;

      myList.push_back(tmp);
    }

    DoSomeStuff(myList);
  }
  catch(...)
  {
  }

  while (!myList.empty())
  {
    delete myList.back();
    myList.pop_back();
  }
}

Also: why is it that even managed lanuages provide a finally-block despite resources being deallocated automatically by the garbage collector anyway?

Hint: there's more you can do with "finally" than just memory deallocation.

  • 16
    Managed languages need finally-blocks precisely because only one kind of resource is automatically managed: memory. RAII means that all resources can be handled in the same way, so no need for finally. If you actually used RAII in your example (by using smart pointers in your list instead of naked ones), the code would be simpler than your "finally"-example. And even simpler if you don't check the return value of new - checking it is pretty much pointless. – Myto Jun 2 '10 at 14:59
  • 7
    new doesn't return NULL, it throws an exception instead – Hasturkun Jun 2 '10 at 15:07
  • 5
    You raise an important question, but it does have 2 possible answers. One is that given by Myto -- use smart pointers for all dynamic allocations. The other is to use standard containers, which always destroy their contents upon destruction. Either way, every allocated object is ultimately owned by a statically allocated object which automatically frees it upon destruction. It's a real shame that these better solutions are hard for programmers to discover because of the high visibility of plain pointers and arrays. – j_random_hacker Jun 4 '10 at 2:53
  • 4
    C++11 improves this and includes std::shared_ptr and std::unique_ptr directly in the stdlib. – u0b34a0f6ae Oct 19 '11 at 21:33
  • 15
    The reason your example is so horrid looking isn't because RAII is flawed, rather it is because you failed to use it. Raw pointers are not RAII. – Ben Voigt Apr 27 '13 at 22:18
6

FWIW, Microsoft Visual C++ does support try,finally and it has historically been used in MFC apps as a method of catching serious exceptions that would otherwise result in a crash. For example;

int CMyApp::Run() 
{
    __try
    {
        int i = CWinApp::Run();
        m_Exitok = MAGIC_EXIT_NO;
        return i;
    }
    __finally
    {
        if (m_Exitok != MAGIC_EXIT_NO)
            FaultHandler();
    }
}

I've used this in the past to do things like save backups of open files prior to exit. Certain JIT debugging settings will break this mechanism though.

  • 4
    bear in mind that's not really C++ exceptions, but SEH ones. You can use both in MS C++ code. SEH is an OS exception handler that is the way VB, .NET implement exceptions. – gbjbaanb Oct 4 '08 at 23:13
  • and you can use SetUnhandledExceptionHandler to create a 'global' un-catched exception handler - for SEH exceptions. – gbjbaanb Oct 4 '08 at 23:14
  • 3
    SEH is horrible and also prevents C++ destructors from being called – paulm Jun 24 '13 at 10:30
5

As pointed out in the other answers, C++ can support finally-like functionality. The implementation of this functionality that is probably closest to being part of the standard language is the one accompanying the C++ Core Guidelines, a set of best practices for using C++ edited by Bjarne Stoustrup and Herb Sutter. An implementation of finally is part of the Guidelines Support Library (GSL). Throughout the Guidelines, use of finally is recommended when dealing with old-style interfaces, and it also has a guideline of its own, titled Use a final_action object to express cleanup if no suitable resource handle is available.

So, not only does C++ support finally, it is actually recommended to use it in a lot of common use-cases.

An example use of the GSL implementation would look like:

#include <gsl/gsl_util.h>

void example()
{
    int handle = get_some_resource();
    auto handle_clean = gsl::finally([&handle] { clean_that_resource(handle); });

    // Do a lot of stuff, return early and throw exceptions.
    // clean_that_resource will always get called.
}

The GSL implementation and usage is very similar to the one in Paolo.Bolzoni's answer. One difference is that the object created by gsl::finally() lacks the disable() call. If you need that functionality (say, to return the resource once it's assembled and no exceptions are bound to happen), you might prefer Paolo's implementation. Otherwise, using GSL is as close to using standardized features as you will get.

3

Not really, but you can emulate them to some extend, for example:

int * array = new int[10000000];
try {
  // Some code that can throw exceptions
  // ...
  throw std::exception();
  // ...
} catch (...) {
  // The finally-block (if an exception is thrown)
  delete[] array;
  // re-throw the exception.
  throw; 
}
// The finally-block (if no exception was thrown)
delete[] array;

Note that the finally-block might itself throw an exception before the original exception is re-thrown, thereby discarding the original exception. This is the exact same behavior as in a Java finally-block. Also, you cannot use return inside the try&catch blocks.

  • 3
    I'm glad that you mentioned the finally block might throw; it's the thing that most of the "use RAII" answers seem to ignore. To avoid having to write the finally block twice, you could do something like std::exception_ptr e; try { /*try block*/ } catch (...) { e = std::current_exception(); } /*finally block*/ if (e) std::rethrow_exception(e); – sethobrien Mar 23 '15 at 17:14
  • 1
    That's all I wanted to know! Why none of the other answers explained that a catch(...) + empty throw; works almost like a finally block? Sometimes you just need it. – VinGarcia Jul 20 '16 at 21:06
  • The solution I provided in my answer (stackoverflow.com/a/38701485/566849) should allow for throwing exceptions from inside the finally block. – Fabio A. Aug 1 '16 at 14:39
3

I came up with a finally macro that can be used almost like¹ the finally keyword in Java; it makes use of std::exception_ptr and friends, lambda functions and std::promise, so it requires C++11 or above; it also makes use of the compound statement expression GCC extension, which is also supported by clang.

WARNING: an earlier version of this answer used a different implementation of the concept with many more limitations.

First, let's define a helper class.

#include <future>

template <typename Fun>
class FinallyHelper {
    template <typename T> struct TypeWrapper {};
    using Return = typename std::result_of<Fun()>::type;

public:    
    FinallyHelper(Fun body) {
        try {
            execute(TypeWrapper<Return>(), body);
        }
        catch(...) {
            m_promise.set_exception(std::current_exception());
        }
    }

    Return get() {
        return m_promise.get_future().get();
    }

private:
    template <typename T>
    void execute(T, Fun body) {
        m_promise.set_value(body());
    }

    void execute(TypeWrapper<void>, Fun body) {
        body();
    }

    std::promise<Return> m_promise;
};

template <typename Fun>
FinallyHelper<Fun> make_finally_helper(Fun body) {
    return FinallyHelper<Fun>(body);
}

Then there's the actual macro.

#define try_with_finally for(auto __finally_helper = make_finally_helper([&] { try 
#define finally });                         \
        true;                               \
        ({return __finally_helper.get();})) \
/***/

It can be used like this:

void test() {
    try_with_finally {
        raise_exception();
    }    

    catch(const my_exception1&) {
        /*...*/
    }

    catch(const my_exception2&) {
        /*...*/
    }

    finally {
        clean_it_all_up();
    }    
}

The use of std::promise makes it very easy to implement, but it probably also introduces quite a bit of unneeded overhead which could be avoided by reimplementing only the needed functionalities from std::promise.


¹ CAVEAT: there are a few things that don't work quite like the java version of finally. Off the top of my head:

  1. it's not possible to break from an outer loop with the break statement from within the try and catch()'s blocks, since they live within a lambda function;
  2. there must be at least one catch() block after the try: it's a C++ requirement;
  3. if the function has a return value other than void but there's no return within the try and catch()'s blocks, compilation will fail because the finally macro will expand to code that will want to return a void. This could be, err, avoided by having a finally_noreturn macro of sorts.

All in all, I don't know if I'd ever use this stuff myself, but it was fun playing with it. :)

  • Yeah, it was just a fast hack, but if the programmer knows what they're doing it might be useful nonetheless. – Fabio A. Aug 1 '16 at 16:42
  • @MarkLakata, I updated the post with a better implementation which supports throwing exceptions and returns. – Fabio A. Aug 1 '16 at 23:08
  • Looks good. You could get rid of Caveat 2 by just putting in an impossible catch(xxx) {} block at the start of the finally macro, where xxx is a bogus type just for the purposes of having at least one catch block. – Mark Lakata Aug 1 '16 at 23:31
  • @MarkLakata, I thought of that too, but that would make it impossible to use catch(...), wouldn't it? – Fabio A. Aug 1 '16 at 23:37
  • I don't think so. Just make up an obscure type xxx in a private namespace that will never be used. – Mark Lakata Aug 1 '16 at 23:42
2

I have a use case where I think finally should be a perfectly acceptable part of the C++11 language, as I think it is easier to read from a flow point of view. My use case is a consumer/producer chain of threads, where a sentinel nullptr is sent at the end of the run to shut down all threads.

If C++ supported it, you would want your code to look like this:

    extern Queue downstream, upstream;

    int Example()
    {
        try
        {
           while(!ExitRequested())
           {
             X* x = upstream.pop();
             if (!x) break;
             x->doSomething();
             downstream.push(x);
           } 
        }
        finally { 
            downstream.push(nullptr);
        }
    }

I think this is more logical that putting your finally declaration at the start of the loop, since it occurs after the loop has exited... but that is wishful thinking because we can't do it in C++. Note that the queue downstream is connected to another thread, so you can't put in the sentinel push(nullptr) in the destructor of downstream because it can't be destroyed at this point... it needs to stay alive until the other thread receives the nullptr.

So here is how to use a RAII class with lambda to do the same:

    class Finally
    {
    public:

        Finally(std::function<void(void)> callback) : callback_(callback)
        {
        }
        ~Finally()
        {
            callback_();
        }
        std::function<void(void)> callback_;
    };

and here is how you use it:

    extern Queue downstream, upstream;

    int Example()
    {
        Finally atEnd([](){ 
           downstream.push(nullptr);
        });
        while(!ExitRequested())
        {
           X* x = upstream.pop();
           if (!x) break;
           x->doSomething();
           downstream.push(x);
        }
    }
1

As many people have stated, the solution is to use C++11 features to avoid finally blocks. One of the features is unique_ptr.

Here is Mephane's answer written using RAII patterns.

#include <vector>
#include <memory>
#include <list>
using namespace std;

class Foo
{
 ...
};

void DoStuff(vector<string> input)
{
    list<unique_ptr<Foo> > myList;

    for (int i = 0; i < input.size(); ++i)
    {
      myList.push_back(unique_ptr<Foo>(new Foo(input[i])));
    }

    DoSomeStuff(myList);
}

Some more introduction to using unique_ptr with C++ Standard Library containers is here

0

I would like to provide an alternative.

If you want finally block to be called always, just put it after last catch block (which probably should be catch( ... ) to catch not known exception)

try{
   // something that might throw exception
} catch( ... ){
   // what to do with uknown exception
}

//final code to be called always,
//don't forget that it might throw some exception too
doSomeCleanUp(); 

If you want finally block as a last thing to do when any exception is thrown you can use boolean local variable - before run you set it to false and put true assignment at the very end of try block, then after catch block check for the variable value:

bool generalAppState = false;
try{
   // something that might throw exception

   //the very end of try block:
   generalAppState = true;
} catch( ... ){
   // what to do with uknown exception
}

//final code to be called only when exception was thrown,
//don't forget that it might throw some exception too
if( !generalAppState ){
   doSomeCleanUpOfDirtyEnd();
}

//final code to be called only when no exception is thrown
//don't forget that it might throw some exception too
else{
   cleanEnd();
}
  • This doesn't work, because the whole point of a finally block is to perform cleanup even when the code should allow an exception to leave the code block. Consider: ` try { // stuff possibly throwing "B" } catch (A & a) { } finally { // if C++ had it... // stuff that must happen, even if "B" is thrown. } // won't execute if "B" is thrown. ` IMHO, the point of exceptions is to reduce error-handling code, so catch blocks, wherever a throw might occur, is counterproductive. This is why RAII helps: if applied liberally, exceptions matter most at the top and bottom layers. – burlyearly Dec 21 '16 at 15:07
  • 1
    @burlyearly altough your opinion is not holy, I get the point, but in C++ is no such thing so you have to consider this as a top layer that emulates this behavior. – jave.web Dec 22 '16 at 14:35
  • DOWNVOTE = PLEASE COMMENT :) – jave.web Oct 5 at 11:31
-1

I also think that RIIA is not a fully useful replacement for exception handling and having a finally. BTW, I also think RIIA is a bad name all around. I call these types of classes 'janitors' and use them a LOT. 95% of the time they are neither initializing nor acquiring resources, they are applying some change on a scoped basis, or taking something already set up and making sure it's destroyed. This being the official pattern name obsessed internet I get abused for even suggesting my name might be better.

I just don't think it's reasonable to require that that every complicated setup of some ad hoc list of things has to have a class written to contain it in order to avoid complications when cleaning it all back up in the face of needing to catch multiple exception types if something goes wrong in the process. This would lead to lots of ad hoc classes that just wouldn't be necessary otherwise.

Yes it's fine for classes that are designed to manage a particular resource, or generic ones that are designed to handle a set of similar resources. But, even if all of the things involved have such wrappers, the coordination of cleanup may not just be a simple in reverse order invocation of destructors.

I think it makes perfect sense for C++ to have a finally. I mean, jeez, so many bits and bobs have been glued onto it over the last decades that it seems odd folks would suddenly become conservative over something like finally which could be quite useful and probably nothing near as complicated as some other things that have been added (though that's just a guess on my part.)

-2
try
{
  ...
  goto finally;
}
catch(...)
{
  ...
  goto finally;
}
finally:
{
  ...
}
  • 34
    Cute idiom, but its not quite the same. returning in the try block or catch won't pass through your 'finally:' code. – Edward KMETT Apr 23 '10 at 19:48
  • 10
    It's worth keeping this wrong answer (with 0 rating), since Edward Kmett brings up a very important distinction. – Mark Lakata Dec 4 '12 at 7:21
  • 12
    Even bigger flaw (IMO): This code eats all exceptions, which finally does not do. – Ben Voigt Apr 27 '13 at 22:19

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