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I am having a hard time figuring out the purpose some code that I've come across.

The code has a class Foo, which has an __init__ method that takes multiple arguments. From what I've learned of Python so far, by calling Foo('bar'), it will pass this string as a parameter to __init__ (which I think is supposed to be the equivalent of a constructor).

But the issue I am having is that the code I am looking at is calling Foo.__init__('bar') directly. What is the purpose of this? I almost feel that I am missing some other purpose behind __init__.

0
22

The __init__() method gets called for you when you instantiate a class. However, the __init__() method in a parent class doesn't get called automatically, so need you to call it directly if you want to extend its functionality:

class A:

     def __init__(self, x):
          self.x = x

class B(A):

     def __init__(self, x, y):
          A.__init__(self, x)
          self.y = y

Note, the above call can also be written using super:

class B(A):

     def __init__(self, x, y):
          super().__init__(x)
          self.y = y

The purpose of the __init__() method is to initialize the class. It is usually responsible for populating the instance variables. Because of this, you want to have __init__() get called for all classes in the class hierarchy.

1
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    In the second example code block, why do you call super().__init__(x) in the B constructor instead of calling (super())(x)? Maybe this is a separate question, but why doesn't that __init__ call have B's self as its 1st argument? Isn't calling __init__ only necessary if you need to pass in something to use as a reference to the instance?
    – iono
    Feb 4 '21 at 14:30
3

Python allows you to call the constructor (__init__) directly. By calling Foo.__init__(obj, 'bar'), you're doing an initialization/reinitialization of obj

See this code:

class Foo:
    def __init__(self, s):
        self.s = s

f = Foo('abc')
print(f.s) # prints 'abc'
Foo.__init__(f, 'def')
print(f.s) # prints 'def'
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  • 7
    Oh dear. Please don't call __init__ to perform reinitialization in any sane system...
    – nneonneo
    Apr 21 '13 at 0:38
  • I agree. Sorry if my explanation is bad. Right now I just wanted to show what __init__ does. Not where it should be called.
    – aldeb
    Apr 21 '13 at 0:39
  • 2
    Saying "__init__ is not really a constructor, it's rather an initializer" is not helpful. It's something someone wrote in a book once that has become repeated all over the internet, despite the fact that it makes no sense and just confuses people who already know what a constructor is who are learning Python. __init__ exactly corresponds to constructors from other languages, and the official Python documentation even refers to it as one! If you could call a constructor on an existing object in any other OO language, this is exactly what it would do.
    – Ben
    Apr 21 '13 at 2:55
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    I founded the first answer of this topic that resumes well what I want to tell: stackoverflow.com/questions/6578487/init-as-a-constructor. Also __init__ doesn't "exactly corresponds to constructors from other languages", since you can't write what I wrote above in other languages (AFAIK in c, c++, Java). What I wanted to say is that __init__ doesn't create a new object, as in other languages, and I think it's useful to know that to understand metaclasses. However I know __init__ shouldn't be called for that purpose as I said in my previous comment.
    – aldeb
    Apr 21 '13 at 8:22
  • @segfolt Java and C++ constructors don't create new objects either. By the time the constructor is invoked, the object is already created (I don't ever recall writing something like this = malloc(...) in a constructor; do you?). The purpose of a __init__ is to operate on a "blank" object to initialise the data contained within it, and it's invoked automatically by the object-creation machinery when you call SomeClass(...) after the object is created but before the SomeClass(...) expression returns its value to the caller. Sounds exactly like a Java/C++ constructor to me...
    – Ben
    Apr 22 '13 at 3:23
0

Yes - when inheriting class invokes __init__() of the parent class. AFAIK, this is the only valid case of calling __init__() explicitly.

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Inheritance. If you use Foo.init(something) it will probally be like a child class of the foo class.

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    – Community Bot
    Dec 31 '21 at 23:30

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