99

I am getting the weather information from a URL.

weather = urllib2.urlopen('url')
wjson = weather.read()

and what I am getting is:

{
  "data": {
     "current_condition": [{
        "cloudcover": "0",
        "humidity": "54",
        "observation_time": "08:49 AM",
        "precipMM": "0.0",
        "pressure": "1025",
        "temp_C": "10",
        "temp_F": "50",
        "visibility": "10",
        "weatherCode": "113",
        "weatherDesc": [{
            "value": "Sunny"
        }],
        "weatherIconUrl": [{
            "value": "http:\/\/www.worldweatheronline.com\/images\/wsymbols01_png_64\/wsymbol_0001_sunny.png"
        }],
        "winddir16Point": "E",
        "winddirDegree": "100",
        "windspeedKmph": "22",
        "windspeedMiles": "14"
    }]        
 }
}

How can I access any element I want?

if I do: print wjson['data']['current_condition']['temp_C'] I am getting error saying:

string indices must be integers, not str.

1
  • 2
    requests is an amazing way to get along with JSON..If you are handling complicated URL's.. use it.
    – Surya
    Apr 21, 2013 at 10:12

8 Answers 8

150
import json
weather = urllib2.urlopen('url')
wjson = weather.read()
wjdata = json.loads(wjson)
print wjdata['data']['current_condition'][0]['temp_C']

What you get from the url is a json string. And your can't parse it with index directly. You should convert it to a dict by json.loads and then you can parse it with index.

Instead of using .read() to intermediately save it to memory and then read it to json, allow json to load it directly from the file:

wjdata = json.load(urllib2.urlopen('url'))
3
  • 1
    cool, it is working now. can you please explain me why this is?
    – doniyor
    Apr 21, 2013 at 9:21
  • 1
    Yarkee has already explained @doniyor. It's because it's been converted to a dict using json.loads(). You're just trying to access the JSON directly... without transforming into anything readable by Python or using a module to do so.
    – Ben
    Apr 21, 2013 at 9:34
  • 1
    Is there a way to return this without knowing the index, assuming there were more current condition entries? Feb 23, 2018 at 16:06
34

Here's an alternative solution using requests:

import requests
wjdata = requests.get('url').json()
print wjdata['data']['current_condition'][0]['temp_C']
1
  • 2
    Is there a way to return this without knowing the index, assuming there were more current condition entries? Feb 23, 2018 at 16:06
8

'temp_C' is a key inside dictionary that is inside a list that is inside a dictionary

This way works:

wjson['data']['current_condition'][0]['temp_C']
>> '10'
2

You can do it this way too:

MYJSON = {
    'username': 'gula_gut',
    'pics': '/0/myfavourite.jpeg',
    'id': '1'
}

#changing username
MYJSON['username'] = 'calixto'
print(MYJSON['username'])
1

Another alternative way using get method with requests:

import requests
wjdata = requests.get('url').json()
print wjdata.get('data').get('current_condition')[0].get('temp_C')
0
1
import json

# some JSON:
json_str =  '{ "name":"Sarah", "age":25, "city":"Chicago"}'

# parse json_str:
json = json.loads(json_str)

# get tags from json   
tags = []
for tag in json:
    tags.append(tag)
  

# print each tag name e your content
for i in range(len(tags)):
    print(tags[i] + ': ' + str(json[tags[i]]))
1

Like other answers have pointed out, the accepted answer to this question seems to ignore the data structure misunderstanding of the original poster.

The main issue seems to be that the original solution treats the JSON purely as a dictionary, when in fact it is a...

dictionary within a list, within a dictionary, within a dictionary

Thus, ['data'] is required to access the top-level key:value pair of the dictionary, ['current_conditions'] accesses the next level of dictionary, then [0] must be used to access the first element of the list (which has only 1 element).

Only then can ['temp_C'] be used to access the actual value for that key and retrieve the data.

x={
  "data": {
            "current_condition": 
                [{
                    "cloudcover": "0",
                    "humidity": "54",
                    "observation_time": "08:49 AM",
                    "precipMM": "0.0",
                    "pressure": "1025",
                    "temp_C": "10",
                    "temp_F": "50",
                    "visibility": "10",
                    "weatherCode": "113",
                    "weatherDesc": 
                        [{
                            "value": "Sunny"
                        }],
                    
                    "weatherIconUrl": 
                        [{
                            "value": "http:\/\/www.worldweatheronline.com\/images\/wsymbols01_png_64\/wsymbol_0001_sunny.png"
                        }],
                    "winddir16Point": "E",
                    "winddirDegree": "100",
                    "windspeedKmph": "22",
                    "windspeedMiles": "14"
                },
                {
                    "cloudcover": "0",
                    "humidity": "54",
                    "observation_time": "08:49 AM",
                    "precipMM": "0.0",
                    "pressure": "1025",
                    "temp_C": "5",
                    "temp_F": "50",
                    "visibility": "10",
                    "weatherCode": "113",
                    "weatherDesc": 
                        [{
                            "value": "Sunny"
                        }],
                    
                    "weatherIconUrl": 
                        [{
                            "value": "http:\/\/www.worldweatheronline.com\/images\/wsymbols01_png_64\/wsymbol_0001_sunny.png"
                        }],
                    "winddir16Point": "E",
                    "winddirDegree": "100",
                    "windspeedKmph": "22",
                    "windspeedMiles": "14"
                }    ]        
            }
}


print(x['data']['current_condition'][0]['weatherDesc'][0]['value'])

# results in 'Sunny' 

In answer to another question in comments,

"Is there a way to do this without knowing the index, assuming there were more current condition entries?"

Assuming numerous current_condition entries it is unlikely that you would just want one value, or if you do then you'll likely have another piece of information to locate that specific value (i.e. location or something).

Assuming you data set is named x, i.e. x = {"data": ...}.

If you want all of the current_condition entries you can loop through the list (of current_conditions) using:

y = []

for index in range(0,len(x['data']['current_condition']))
   y.append(x['data']['current_condition'][index]['temp_C'])
2
  • please remove any image and post a minimal structure as formatted text.
    – devReddit
    Jul 20, 2021 at 15:09
  • Thanks Tomerikoo for the formatting edit! Much appreciated.
    – Jay Young
    Jul 21, 2021 at 11:38
1

I did this method for in-depth navigation of a Json

def filter_dict(data: dict, extract):
    try:
        if isinstance(extract, list):
            while extract:
                if result := filter_dict(data, extract.pop(0)):
                    return result
        shadow_data = data.copy()
        for key in extract.split('.'):
            if str(key).isnumeric():
                key = int(key)
            shadow_data = shadow_data[key]
        return shadow_data
    except (IndexError, KeyError, AttributeError, TypeError):
        return None

filter_dict(wjdata, 'data.current_condition.0.temp_C')
# 10

Using the multiple fields:
filter_dict(wjdata, ['data.current_condition.0.temp_C', 'data.current_condition.1.temp_C']) This working as a OR when take the first element found

# 10

0

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