I have a script which reads a text file, pulls decimal numbers out of it as strings and places them into a list.

So I have this list:

['0.49', '0.54', '0.54', '0.54', '0.54', '0.54', '0.55', '0.54', '0.54', '0.54', '0.55', '0.55', '0.55', '0.54', '0.55', '0.55', '0.54', '0.55', '0.55', '0.54']

How do I convert each of the values in the list from a string to a float?

I have tried:

for item in list:
    float(item)

But this doesn't seem to work for me.

  • 37
    Don't use list as a variable name. – Tim Pietzcker Oct 23 '09 at 15:39
up vote 282 down vote accepted
[float(i) for i in lst]

to be precise, it creates a new list with float values. Unlike the map approach it will work in py3k.

  • I had the same issue, and unsolved: ff1=['0.49', '0.54', '0.54', '0.54', '0.54', '0.54', '0.55', '0.54', '0.54', '0.54', '0.55', '0.55', '0.55', '0.54', '0.55', '0.55', '0.54', '0.55', '0.55', '0.54'] #ff = [float(i.strip("[]")) for i in ff1] ff = [float(i) for i in ff1] print "\n%s" % ff print "\nTypeof ff = %s" % type(ff) and the Type is still the "List" always – Aravind Nadumane Jul 1 '16 at 14:55
  • 1
    For large array's, I would recommend using numpy: np.array(inp_list, dtype=np.float32). You don't even have to specify if it's a float and just use: np.array(inp_list) – Thomas Devoogdt May 23 at 13:40

map(float, mylist) should do it.

(In Python 3, map ceases to return a list object, so if you want a new list and not just something to iterate over, you either need list(map(float, mylist) - or use SilentGhost's answer which arguably is more pythonic.)

float(item) do the right thing: it converts its argument to float and and return it, but it doesn't change argument in-place. A simple fix for your code is:

new_list = []
for item in list:
    new_list.append(float(item))

The same code can written shorter using list comprehension: new_list = [float(i) for i in list]

To change list in-place:

for index, item in enumerate(list):
    list[index] = float(item)

BTW, avoid using list for your variables, since it masquerades built-in function with the same name.

  • Sorry, I did not get what in-place means here. How does it differ from the previous pythonic answer. Doesn't the conversion in the previous answer "[float(i) for i in lst]" retain the original list index – AAI Jan 29 at 17:34
  • 1
    @AAI Change original list vs. create a new one. – Denis Otkidach Jan 31 at 4:05

This would be the an other method (without using any loop!):

import numpy as np
list(np.float_(list_name))
  • Don't need to cast the np.array into the list again if you like to keep it as an np.array =) – alvas Jun 19 at 1:49

You can use numpy to convert a list directly to a floating array or matrix.

    import numpy as np
    list_ex = [1, 0] # This a list
    list_int = np.array(list_ex) # This is a numpy integer array

If you want to convert the integer array to a floating array then add 0. to it

    list_float = np.array(list_ex) + 0. # This is a numpy floating array

This is how I would do it.

my_list = ['0.49', '0.54', '0.54', '0.54', '0.54', '0.54', '0.55', '0.54', 
    '0.54', '0.54', '0.55', '0.55', '0.55', '0.54', '0.55', '0.55', '0.54', 
    '0.55', '0.55', '0.54']
print type(my_list[0]) # prints <type 'str'>
my_list = [float(i) for i in my_list]
print type(my_list[0]) # prints <type 'float'>
import numpy as np
my_list = ['0.49', '0.54', '0.54', '0.54', '0.54', '0.54', '0.55', '0.54', '0.54', '0.54', '0.55', '0.55', '0.55', '0.54', '0.55', '0.55', '0.54', 
'0.55', '0.55', '0.54']
print(type(my_list), type(my_list[0]))   
# <class 'list'> <class 'str'>

which displays the type as a list of strings. You can convert this list to an array of floats simultaneously using numpy:

    my_list = np.array(my_list).astype(np.float)

    print(type(my_list), type(my_list[0]))  
    # <class 'numpy.ndarray'> <class 'numpy.float64'>

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.