5

I'm having a bit of performance problem with an EF query.

We basically have this:

public class Article
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public virtual List<Visit> Visits { get; set; }
}
public class Visit
{
    public int? ArticleID { get; set; }
    public DateTime Date { get; set; }
}

Now, I would like to do:

Article a = ...;
vm.Count = a.Visits.Count;

The problem is that, from what I can gather, this first causes the entire list being fetched, and then the count of it. When doing this in a loop this creates a performance problem.

I assumed that it was due to the object being "too concrete", so I've tried to move the Visits.Count call as far back in repository as I can (so that we're sort of working directly with the DbContext). That didn't help.

Any suggestions?

  • You could add a GetVisitsCount to article? - depends how much you plan on using it, if its only a couple of times then it wouldn't be much of a performance problem anyway so I presume its quite a lot – Sayse Apr 22 '13 at 10:18
0

Assuming your data context has a Visits property:

public class MyDbContext: DbContext
{
    public IDbSet<Article> Articles { get; set; }
    public IDbSet<Visit> Visits { get; set; }
}

you could do that:

using (var ctx = new MyDbContext())
{
    var count = ctx.Visits.Where(x => x.ArticleID == 123).Count();
}

Also if the Visits collection is not always required when dealing with an article you could declare it as IEnumerable<T>:

public class Article
{
    public int ID { get; set; }
    public virtual IEnumerable<Visit> Visits { get; set; }
}

and then rely on the lazy loading.

  • This seems like the best bet so far, and close to what I've done so far. I did something similar but with a join between Visits and Articles. – NiklasJ Apr 22 '13 at 12:10
  • I don't know if I should mark this as the solution or mine. This is nicer but not how i did it. The IEnumerable "trick" didn't seem to work though, i had to use ICollection. – NiklasJ Apr 22 '13 at 16:27
0

I think the performance issue might be in the lazy loading. (But need to see more code for that).

Try an include(a => a.Visits) on the moment you retrieve articles from the dbcontext.

for more inforamtion on EF performance: http://www.asp.net/web-forms/tutorials/continuing-with-ef/maximizing-performance-with-the-entity-framework-in-an-asp-net-web-application

  • I tried this, but this didn't help a lot. I still think the "concretization" of this sorta huge list is the problem, and that this just pushes the evaluation slightly earlier. – NiklasJ Apr 22 '13 at 12:07
0

In the end I did it another way.

I found that this was hit over and over in different ways, and due to the way the rest of the domain model is set up, I made a bit of a hack:

In my VisitRepository I created a new function GetArticleIDsWithVisit(), which makes a direct sql call via db.SqlQuery, returning a Dictionary. The dictionary is cached and used in all places where visit counts are needed.

Not very pretty, but I have wrapped it inside the repository so I think it's ok.

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