56

I am confused about which syntax to use if I want to pass an array of known or unknown size as a function parameter.

Suppose I have these variants for the purpose:

void func1(char* str) {
    //print str
}

void func2(char str[]) {
    //print str
}

void func3(char str[10]) {
    //print str
}

What are the pros and cons of using each one of these?

  • 9
    C or C++? Pick one. – Lightness Races with Monica Apr 22 '13 at 10:45
  • 5
    What difference does it make whether it's c or c++? – Pete Fordham Apr 22 '13 at 17:22
  • 1
    In C you can do a 4th case void func (size_t size, char str[size]), which might be preferable in some situations. Not possible in C++ though. – Lundin Jun 8 '15 at 14:16
  • I agree that it shouldn't have both tags because C and C++ are two independent languages. – RastaJedi Apr 22 '16 at 1:02
72

All these variants are the same. C just lets you use alternative spellings but even the last variant explicitly annotated with an array size decays to a normal pointer.

That is, even with the last implementation you could call the function with an array of any size:

void func3(char str[10]) { }

func("test"); // Works.
func("let's try something longer"); // Not a single f*ck given.

Needless to say this should not be used: it might give the user a false sense of security (“oh, this function only accepts an array of length 10 so I don’t need to check the length myself”).

As Henrik said, the correct way in C++ is to use std::string, std::string& or std::string const& (depending on whether you need to modify the object, and whether you want to copy).

  • 1
    +1: Hard to find anything wrong with this. And I did try! – Lightness Races with Monica Apr 22 '13 at 10:46
  • This bit me when I tried to use boost::begin() on a function with sized array as parameter. Doesn't work. Was just pointer.. meh. – Macke Apr 22 '13 at 13:47
  • @Macke If that’s still relevant have a look at Morwenn’s answer, you can pass fixed-sized arrays to a function, albeit only by reference (but that should never be a problem). – Konrad Rudolph Apr 22 '13 at 14:47
  • might be useful to cite the standard: C99 standard 6.7.5.3, para. 7, "A declaration of a parameter as "array of type" shall be adjusted to "qualified pointer to type" ..." – newacct Apr 22 '13 at 18:22
  • 1
    @pmttavara We're talking about non string literal situations here. Otherwise by all means use a char const* (or pass an array by reference, i.e. char (&arr)[N], where N is a non type template argument). In most other situations you either incur no allocation or the cost is negligible. Working on stack allocated char buffers is very rarely a good idea. – Konrad Rudolph Jan 19 '18 at 21:33
20

Note that in C++, if the length of the array is known at compile time (for example if you passed a string literal), you can actually get its size:

template<unsigned int N>
void func(const char(&str)[N])
{
    // Whatever...
}

int main()
{
    func("test"); // Works, N is 5
}
  • This will make a (tweaked) copy of func machine code for each new length of the literal passed. – Ruslan Mar 27 '18 at 11:22
  • @Ruslan True, yet I would expect any compiler to inline that at even the lowest optimization level. – Morwenn Mar 27 '18 at 11:30
  • Depends on the size of // Whatever.... – Ruslan Mar 27 '18 at 12:44
  • @Ruslan Oh right, I was just thinking of a function to get the size of an array and forgot the scope of the question was broader :/ – Morwenn Mar 27 '18 at 12:45
11

In C++, use void func4(const std::string& str).

  • Or void func4( std::vector<char> const& str ). – James Kanze Apr 22 '13 at 10:30
9

These are all functionally identical. When you pass an array to a function in C, the array gets implicitly converted to a pointer to the first element of the array. Hence, these three functions will print the same output (that is, the size of a pointer to char).

void func1(char* str) {
    printf("sizeof str: %zu\n", sizeof str);
}

void func2(char str[]) {
    printf("sizeof str: %zu\n", sizeof str);
}

void func3(char str[10]) {
    printf("sizeof str: %zu\n", sizeof str);
}

This conversion only applies to the first dimension of an array. A char[42][13] gets converted to a char (*)[13], not a char **.

void func4(char (*str_array)[13]) {
    printf("sizeof str_array: %zu\n"
           "sizeof str_array[0]: %zu\n", sizeof str_array, sizeof str_array[0]);
}

char (*)[13] is the type of str_array. It's how you write "a pointer to an array of 13 chars". This could have also been written as void func4(char str_array[42][13]) { ... }, though the 42 is functionally meaningless as you can see by experimenting, passing arrays of different sizes into func4.

In C99 and C11 (but not C89 or C++), you can pass a pointer to an array of varying size into a function, by passing it's size along with it, and including the size identifier in the [square brackets]. For example:

void func5(size_t size, char (*str_array)[size]) {
    printf("sizeof str_array: %zu\n"
           "sizeof str_array[0]: %zu\n", sizeof str_array, sizeof str_array[0]);
}

This declares a pointer to an array of size chars. Note that you must dereference the pointer before you can access the array. In the example above, sizeof str_array[0] evaluates to the size of the array, not the size of the first element. As an example, to access the 11th element, use (*str_array)[11] or str_array[0][11].

  • 1
    Might make it more explicit that the last code is valid C but not valid C++ (for the moment). – Konrad Rudolph Apr 22 '13 at 11:37
  • @KonradRudolph Thanks for the suggestion. I've amended that section of my answer. – autistic Apr 22 '13 at 15:21
  • @RastaJedi if you're going to nitpick, cite the C standard and get it right: "Except when it is the operand of the sizeof operator, the _Alignof operator, or the unary & operator, or is a string literal used to initialize an array, an expression that has type ''array of type'' is converted to an expression with type ''pointer to type'' that points to the initial element of the array object and is not an lvalue." section 6.3.2.1p3 – autistic May 5 '16 at 7:30
  • @RastaJedi so you can see this is indeed a conversion and not a "decay" (none of the C standards use that term)... If it isn't an explicit conversion (e.g. a typecast) then what is it? An implicit one, obviously... – autistic May 5 '16 at 7:47
1

In a one dimensional array they are all treated the same by the compiler. However for a two or more dimensional array, (e.g. myArray[10][10]), it is useful as it can be used to determine the row/column length of an array.

  • 2
    No, the third function does not pass an array of a fixed size. This would imply that there is a difference between those functions but there really is none. The type of all three functions is the same. If you want to provide a hint as to the expected array size, use a comment or documentation, that makes it clear that the size isn’t checked by the compiler. – Konrad Rudolph Apr 22 '13 at 10:40
  • my bad, thank you. :D – user2301717 Apr 22 '13 at 10:43
1

To add-on, describing in points.

1) As everyone told it is same.

2) Arrays are decayed into pointers when they are passed in the function arguments.

3) Fundamental problem could be finding the size of a array in the function. For that we can use macro like.

   #define noOfElements(v) sizeof(v)/sizeof(0[v])

   int arr[100]
   myfunction ( arr, noOfElements(arr))

either 0[v] or v[0] can be used in the macro, where the first is used to avoid user defined data type passed in to noOfElements.

Hope this helps.

  • It should be v[0] in the macro you defined there. – saint1729 Nov 7 '14 at 7:13
  • 2
    v[0], can be written as 0[v], actually the conversion happens like this *(v+0) and *(0+v) respectively. – Whoami Jan 14 '15 at 7:00
  • If you are using a macro, even better to define a macro to give you the arr pointer and size where you only have to write arr once (to avoid copy and paste errors). For example, #define ARRAY_WITH_SIZE(x) x,sizeof(x). Then you can call myfunction(ARRAY_WITH_SIZE(arr)); - You could also define ARRAY_WITH_LENGTH by using the same concept you used above. – Wayne Uroda Apr 12 '16 at 6:41
1

In C, the first two definitions are equivalent.The third one is essentially same but it gives an idea about the size of the array.

If printing str is your intent, then you can safely use any of them.Essentially all three of the functions are passed a parameter of type char*,just what printf() needs to print a string.And lest you don't know, despite what it may seem, all parameter passing in C is done in pass-by-value mode.

Edit: Seems like I'll have to be very rigorous in my choice of words on SO henceforth.Well,in the third case it gives no idea about the size of the array to the function to which it is passed as eventually it is reduced to type char* just as in the first two cases.I meant to say it kinda tells the human reading it that the array's size is 10.Also,it is not wrong/illegal in C.But for the program,doing it is as good as useless.It gives no idea whatsoever about the array size to the function it is passed to.Mr.Downvoter, thanks for pointing out that casual attitude and negligence is not tolerated on SO.

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