43

Anyone knows why javascript Number.toString function does not represents negative numbers correctly?

//If you try
(-3).toString(2); //shows "-11"
// but if you fake a bit shift operation it works as expected
(-3 >>> 0).toString(2); // print "11111111111111111111111111111101"

I am really curious why it doesn't work properly or what is the reason it works this way? I've searched it but didn't find anything that helps.

14

Short answer:

  1. The toString() function takes the decimal, converts it to binary and adds a "-" sign.

  2. A zero fill right shift converts it's operands to signed 32-bit integers in two complements format.

A more detailed answer:

Question 1:

//If you try
(-3).toString(2); //show "-11"

It's in the function .toString(). When you output a number via .toString():

Syntax

numObj.toString([radix])

If the numObj is negative, the sign is preserved. This is the case even if the radix is 2; the string returned is the positive binary representation of the numObj preceded by a - sign, not the two's complement of the numObj.

It takes the decimal, converts it to binary and adds a "-" sign.

  1. Base 10 "3" converted to base 2 is "11"
  2. Add a sign gives us "-11"

Question 2:

// but if you fake a bit shift operation it works as expected
        (-3 >>> 0).toString(2); // print "11111111111111111111111111111101"

A zero fill right shift converts it's operands to signed 32-bit integers. The result of that operation is always an unsigned 32-bit integer.

The operands of all bitwise operators are converted to signed 32-bit integers in two's complement format.

  • 1
    This is the only one correct answer, had implementation of this operator been revised after 2013 ... ? – Carr Mar 1 '18 at 17:24
  • The result of the unsigned right shift operator is an unsigned 32-bit integer. See tc39.es/ecma262/#sec-unsigned-right-shift-operator. – MikeM Jun 20 at 17:59
  • Thanks for pointing that out, might be relevant to add – Daan Jun 21 at 6:49
27

-3 >>> 0 (right logical shift) coerces its arguments to unsigned integers, which is why you get the 32-bit two's complement representation of -3.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Two%27s_complement

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logical_shift

  • Why an unsigned? Unsigned integers in C++ aren't negative and never use two's complement. It's signed integers that can be negative and it's binary value is represented by two's complement. – Adam Dreaver Jul 29 '13 at 21:34
  • This question was about Javascript, not C++. Also, since you're coercing a negative integer to an unsigned integer, the only sane result (aside from maybe telling you "don't do that") is to return the two's complement result (so basic arithmetic at least works the same). – Steve Wang Aug 12 '13 at 19:33
  • 1
    @SteveWang It says here that "the operands of all bitwise operators are converted to signed 32-bit integers in two's complement format", not unsigned. – nglee Jan 31 '18 at 8:44
  • @nglee, that is probably because Steve does not blindly believe what is on MDN. (+1) – trincot Mar 28 at 15:13
18
var binary = (-3 >>> 0).toString(2); // coerced to uint32

console.log(binary);

console.log(parseInt(binary, 2) >> 0); // to int32

on jsfiddle

output is

11111111111111111111111111111101
-3 
1

.toString() is designed to return the sign of the number in the string representation. See EcmaScript 2015, section 7.1.12.1:

  1. If m is less than zero, return the String concatenation of the String "-" and ToString(−m).

This rule is no different for when a radix is passed as argument, as can be concluded from section 20.1.3.6:

  1. Return the String representation of this Number value using the radix specified by radixNumber. [...] the algorithm should be a generalization of that specified in 7.1.12.1.

Once that is understood, the surprising thing is more as to why it does not do the same with -3 >>> 0.

But that behaviour has actually nothing to do with .toString(2), as the value is already different before calling it:

console.log (-3 >>> 0); // 4294967293

It is the consequence of how the >>> operator behaves.

It does not help either that (at the time of writing) the information on mdn is not entirely correct. It says:

The operands of all bitwise operators are converted to signed 32-bit integers in two's complement format.

But this is not true for all bitwise operators. The >>> operator is an exception to the rule. This is clear from the evaluation process specified in EcmaScript 2015, section 12.5.8.1:

  1. Let lnum be ToUint32(lval).

The ToUint32 operation has a step where the operand is mapped into the unsigned 32 bit range:

  1. Let int32bit be int modulo 232.

When you apply the above mentioned modulo operation (not to be confused with JavaScript's % operator) to the example value of -3, you get indeed 4294967293.

As -3 and 4294967293 are evidently not the same number, it is no surprise that (-3).toString(2) is not the same as (4294967293).toString(2).

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