1

I have two divs, one container and one child with two different colors. When I change the margins, either on body or the parent div to a percentage amount, I get a sliver of the parent's background color shining through on the edges indicating that the parent is somehow slightly larger than the child (despite the fact that the child is 100% (or more) of the parent's width and height).

HTML:

<div id="parent">
    <div id="child">test
    </div>
</div>

CSS:

body, html {
width: 100%;
height: 100%;
margin: 0;
padding: 0;
}

#parent {
width: 98%;
height: 60%;
margin: 1% auto;
position: relative;
overflow-x: hidden;
background-color: red;
}

#child {
width: 200%;
height: 100%;
background-color: #337788;
position: absolute;
left: 0;
}

Here's the jsfiddle:

http://jsfiddle.net/Cd2Sd/

I know it has something to do with using a percentage value for the margin, because it depends on how I have the browser scaled. Are there any ways around this?

  • On what browser? Looks fine on Mac Chrome. – svachalek Apr 22 '13 at 22:57
  • PC chrome. It's dependent on the screen resolution though. Try moving around the frame boxes and you should see it eventually – tom c Apr 22 '13 at 22:58
  • @tomc I'm PC chrome and I also don't see the issue. – What have you tried Apr 22 '13 at 23:00
  • Here's a picture. If it isn't happening for you, move the frames around and it will appear: i.imgur.com/DzXiWEt.jpg I'm talking about the thin red line in the far right – tom c Apr 22 '13 at 23:04
  • 1
    I've seen it now. I think it's a bug because of floating point addition: 98% width will give some floating point number, then auto margin could give a 0.5 pixel somewhere. It ends up rounding one way for the parent and a different way for the child. Seems like it's ok as long as either width/height or margin have integer values, but both having fractions will cause trouble. – svachalek Apr 22 '13 at 23:19
2

This ought to fix it

body 
{
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  margin: 0px;
  padding: 0px;
}

#parent 
{
  width: 98%;
  height: 60%;
  margin: 0px 1% 0px 1%;
  overflow: hidden;
  background-color: red;
}

#child
{
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  background-color: #337788;
} 

I've stripped out the extra CSS which I think was confusing things.

Also, The Margin style must be formatted as follows

Margin: Top Left Bottom Right;

The html

<div id="parent">
  <div id="child">test</div>
</div>

UPDATE

Try this instead, I've put your positioning absolute and relative back and also reset the CHILD style back to margin of 0px. I've also implemented the "outline-style" css style it looks fine in both my browsers which are IE9 and Opera 12

body
{
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  margin: 0px;
  padding: 0px;
}

#parent 
{
  width: 98%;
  height: 60%;
  margin: 1%;
  position: relative;
  overflow: hidden;
  background-color: red;
  outline-style: none;
}

#child 
{
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  background-color: #337788;
  position: absolute;
  left: 0px;
  outline-style: none;
}

I don't have Chrome installed, so am unable to test it in that browser

  • Getting rid of the relative and absolute positioning fixes it, but unfortunately I need that for what I'm doing – tom c Apr 22 '13 at 23:10
  • When you add the position relative and absolute, the Child Div will be bound to the left because its absolute therefore it will not be contained by the parent div, instead it will be on the left edge (at 0px) and this would mean it is outside the parent div. – Zeddy Apr 22 '13 at 23:13
  • When you position a child absolutely to a parent that is relative, the 0px would start at the same place as the parent though, so it should cover it. Additionally, the width of the child is 200% so wouldn't that cover any extra slack? – tom c Apr 22 '13 at 23:15
  • Document Type I used is <!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC>. With regards to positioning MSDN says: Setting an absolute position pulls the element out of the flow of the document and positions it without regard to the layout of surrounding elements. If other elements already occupy the given position, they do not affect the positioned element, nor does the positioned element affect them. Instead, all elements are drawn at the same place, causing the objects to overlap. – Zeddy Apr 22 '13 at 23:42
  • 1
    It also says.... An absolutely positioned element is always relative to the next positioned parent. If there isn't a parent element, the containment block is used instead. Values for left and top are relative to the upper-left corner of the next positioned element in the hierarchy. So theres kind of conflicting descriptions there! – Zeddy Apr 22 '13 at 23:43

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