28

I like very much the hint: "Program against an interface, not an implementation" and I am trying to follow it consistently. However I am in doubt how to keep this principle working when I have to decouple my code from objects that must inherit from several interfaces. A typical example could be:

namespace ProgramAgainstInterfaces
{
    interface IMean
    {
            void foo();
    }  

    class Meaning : IMean , IDisposable
    {
        public void Dispose()
        {
            Console .WriteLine("Disposing..." );
        }

        public void foo()
        {
            Console .WriteLine("Doing something..." );           
        }
    }

   class DoingSomething
   {
        static void Main( string[] args)
        {
            IMean ThisMeaning = (IMean ) new Meaning ();  // Here the issue: I am losing the IDisposable methods
            ThisMeaning.foo();
            ThisMeaning.Dispose();                     // Error: i cannot call this method losing functionality
        }
   }   
}

A possible way to solve this could be to define an ad-hoc interface that inherits from both the interfaces:

namespace ProgramAgainstInterfaces
{
    interface IMean
    {
            void foo();
    }

    interface ITry : IMean , IDisposable
    {
    }

    class Meaning : ITry
    {
        public void Dispose()
        {
            Console .WriteLine("Disposing..." );
        }

        public void foo()
        {
            Console .WriteLine("Doing something..." );           
        }
    }

   class DoingSomething
   {
        static void Main( string[] args)
        {
            ITry ThisMeaning = (ITry ) new Meaning ();  // This works
            ThisMeaning.foo();
            ThisMeaning.Dispose();   // The method is available
        }
   }   
}

but i am not sure if this is the more compact and effective solution: I could have more complex multiple inheritance hierarchies and this add complexity because I must create interfaces only to act as containers. There is a better design solution?

6
  • 4
    This might be an interesting question to raise over at programmers.stackexchange.com .
    – glenatron
    Commented Apr 23, 2013 at 9:50
  • 4
    Usually you would check for the implementation of an interface - e.g. var disposable = ThisMeaning as IDisposable; if(disposable != null) disposable.Dispose() - this means you are discovering implementations at runtime rather than having to know them at compile time
    – Charleh
    Commented Apr 23, 2013 at 9:51
  • @Charleh: make that an answer
    – Thilo
    Commented Apr 23, 2013 at 9:55
  • @Thilo done! I prefer this approach as it means you can build types additively by supporting more and more interfaces - obviously keep your eyes out for any caveats, but at the class design phase you should know what you should be supporting interface wise anyway
    – Charleh
    Commented Apr 23, 2013 at 9:59
  • 6
    I don't like the idea of having runtime checks to see if your object might in fact implement some other interface besides the interface that you know it implements. Why would it? I'd say you're using tacit knowledge of the concrete class (Meaning) to influence your code, which in my opinion undermines the entire point of programming to an interface. Use the type system to make your assumptions explicit. If you need a type that is disposable, you should either code against an interface that extends IDisposable or code directly against the concrete type.
    – Einar
    Commented Apr 23, 2013 at 10:31

7 Answers 7

21

If being an "IMean" object involves always being disposable, then you should make the interface implement it like :

public interface IMean : IDisposable
{
    ...
}

However, if it has sense to have an object implementing IMean without being disposable, then I think the solution you suggest is the best : create an intermediary interface so you may have :

public interface IMean
{
    ...
}

public interface IDisposableMean : IMean, IDisposable
{
    ...
}
10

You should have the interface implement IDisposable not the class Meaning. That way when casting to the interface you don't lose that IDisposable ability (because it's defined at your interface level).

Like this:

namespace ProgramAgainstInterfaces
{
    interface IMean : IDisposable
    {
        void foo();
    }

    interface ITry : IMean
    {
    }

    class Meaning : ITry
    {
        public void Dispose()
        {
            Console .WriteLine("Disposing..." );
        }

        public void foo()
        {
            Console .WriteLine("Doing something..." );           
        }
    }

   class DoingSomething
   {
        static void Main( string[] args)
        {
            ITry ThisMeaning = (ITry ) new Meaning ();  // This works
            ThisMeaning.foo();
            ThisMeaning.Dispose();   // The method is available
        }
   }   
}
3
  • So, if not all objects that provide the IMean interface need disposing you'd just create an empty dispose method to satisfy the interface? (Not saying this is good or bad, just want to understand it). Commented Apr 23, 2013 at 9:55
  • @GeorgeDuckett For the purpose of this scenario, he would have to implement IDisposable on the interface IMean purely because he's trying to call Dispose after casting it to the interface. If all objects in the IMean interface didn't need disposing (and say he wasn't casting to the interface before calling dispose), then the Dispose implementation would be better suited back on the Meaning class. Implementing methods just to satisfy an interface can point to either an interface that shouldn't be used, or a method that doesn't belong on that interface. Hope that makes sense. Commented Apr 23, 2013 at 9:59
  • 3
    +1. That's actually the approach used by the .NET framework: Stream implements IDisposable, which is a NOP for MemoryStream but not for FileStream. DbCommand implements IDisposable, which is (basically) a NOP for SqlCommand but not for OleDbCommand.
    – Heinzi
    Commented Apr 23, 2013 at 13:31
7

You could also introduce a generic type T that must implement multiple interfaces. Here is an example to use IFoo and IDisposable:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
    }

    interface IFoo
    {
        void Foo();
    }

    class Bar<T> where T : IFoo, IDisposable
    {
        public Bar(T foo)
        {
            foo.Foo();
            foo.Dispose();
        }
    }
}

This is a bit complicated. It might make sense though if IFoo : IDisposable is wrong from a design point of view.

5

When you have code that requires a type implements multiple different interfaces that's exactly what you usually have to do. But there are quite a few variations on what could happen, depending on the semantics of your code.

For example, your own proposed solution is acceptable if IMean is not necessarily IDisposable but there are many consumers that do require their IMean to be disposable. You could also use an abstract base class to do this -- "program to an interface" does not use "interface" as in "the language construct defined by the interface keyword" but rather "an abstract version of the object".

In fact you could require that any types you consume implement ITry (and thus are disposable) and simply document that it's fine for some types to implement Dispose as a no-op. If consuming an abstract base class you could also provide this no-op implementation as default.

Another solution would be to use generics:

void UseDisposableMeaning<T>(T meaning) where T : IMean, IDisposable
{
    meaning.foo();
    meaning.Dispose();
}

// This allows you to transparently write UseDisposableMeaning(new Meaning());

Still another case would be a consumer that strictly requires only IMean, but also needs to be disposable-aware. You could handle this by fishing for types:

IMean mean = new Meaning();
var disposable = mean as IDisposable;
if (disposable != null) disposable.Dispose();

While this is an acceptable practical solution (especially given that IDisposable is "not just any interface") you should definitely take a step back if you find yourself doing this again and again; in general, any form of "type switching" is considered bad practice.

4

In order to build compositionally, you can just check to see if an object supports a particular piece of functionality (interface) by casting:

e.g.

// Try and cast
var disposable = ThisMeaning as IDisposable; 

// If the cast succeeded you can safely call the interface methods
if(disposable != null) 
    disposable.Dispose();

This means you are discovering implementations at runtime rather than having to know them at compile time and your types don't need to implement IDisposable.

This satisfies the disposable requirement without having to know that IMean is of type Meaning (you can still work with IMean refs)

2

Code to interfaces not to implementation - "interfaces" is a general term, it does not mean literally the keyword interface. Using an abstract class adheres to the principle. And perhaps better if you need some implementation. Further, a subclass can always implement interfaces as needed.

5
  • I don't think this is correct. Coding to an abstract class is not like coding to an interface at all. One of the main reasons you code to an interface is that some other class can code to that same interface with a completely independant implementation--extending an abstract class binds the classes together more tightly and is what you are trying to avoid when you say "Code to an interface"
    – Bill K
    Commented Apr 23, 2013 at 22:18
  • @Bill K, an abstract class is not strictly the same as implementing an interface, of course. But they are both mechanisms for polymorphism and they both can define A public interface. They are not mutually exclusive. In any design mixing abstract (or even concrete) classes with "interface" implementation to express a business/domain is exactly what one should do. Too bad "interface" meaning is overloaded, but "..code to interfaces.." absolutely does not mean "do not use abstract classes."
    – radarbob
    Commented Apr 25, 2013 at 3:24
  • Let me be clear. An abstract class by definition has 1 or more of it's methods declared abstract - it's a signature that a subclass must implement. Further, any modifier can be applied to its methods thus giving subclasses immutable and/or optional implementation. Then subclasses are referenced as their base class, thus client code has an INTERFACE to code against while guaranteeing a) all desired methods (i.e. THE INTERFACE) are in the subclasses b) common behavior is the same c) subclasses exhibit appropriate polymorphism. This is how and why an abstract class is an interface.
    – radarbob
    Commented Apr 25, 2013 at 3:42
  • I understand the difference. The problem isn't an exact definition, however the point of an abstract class is to inherit some functionality/implementation. The point of an interface is to be able to completely replace the implementation, just offering a template through which to access your functionality. They have very different purposes even if an abstract class with no methods implemented is extrememly close to an interface in implementation.
    – Bill K
    Commented Apr 25, 2013 at 16:16
  • Sorry to continue but more importantly an abstract class defines it's children because you can only have one parent class. This means that if another system (with another inheritence tree) wants to use your library they cannot be part of their own inheritence tree if your library requires them to inherit from an abstract class. This is a huge problem and the reason that in 20 years of OO programming I have decreased use of abstract clases from some to just about none in favor of interfaces.
    – Bill K
    Commented Apr 25, 2013 at 16:26
1

Your alternativ was seem in this case a little bit artificial. Let IMean "implement" IDisposable. Programming against classes is not every time bad, i depend on the situation.

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