73

You know in Cocoa there is this thing, for example you can create a UIView and do:

view.autoresizingMask = UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleWidth | UIViewAutoresizingFlexibleHeight;

I have a custom UIView with multiple states, which I have defined in an enum like this:

enum DownloadViewStatus {
  FileNotDownloaded,
  FileDownloading,
  FileDownloaded
};

For each created subview, I set its tag: subview1.tag = FileNotDownloaded;

Then, I have a custom setter for the view state which does the following:

for (UIView *subview in self.subviews) {
  if (subview.tag == viewStatus)
    subview.hidden = NO;
  else
    subview.hidden = YES;
}

But what I am trying to do, is to allow this:

subview1.tag = FileNotDownloaded | FileDownloaded;

So my subview1 shows up in two states of my view. Currently, it doesn't show up in any of those two states since the | operator seems to add the two enum values.

Is there a way to do that?

  • Your (subview.tag == viewStatus) looks wrong to me. Should be ((subview.tag & viewStatus) != 0x0), unless you want to just check for exact matching. In which case you wouldn't need a bitmask in the first place, but just a plain old enum. See second half of my answer. – Regexident Apr 23 '13 at 11:17
268

Declaring Bitmasks:

Alternatively to assigning absolute values (1, 2, 4, …) you can declare bitmasks (how these are called) like this:

typedef enum : NSUInteger {
  FileNotDownloaded = (1 << 0), // => 00000001
  FileDownloading   = (1 << 1), // => 00000010
  FileDownloaded     = (1 << 2)  // => 00000100
} DownloadViewStatus;

or using modern ObjC's NS_OPTIONS/NS_ENUM macros:

typedef NS_OPTIONS(NSUInteger, DownloadViewStatus) {
  FileNotDownloaded = (1 << 0), // => 00000001
  FileDownloading   = (1 << 1), // => 00000010
  FileDownloaded    = (1 << 2)  // => 00000100
};

(see Abizern's answer for more info on the latter)

The concept of bitmasks is to (usually) define each enum value with a single bit set.

Hence ORing two values does the following:

DownloadViewStatus status = FileNotDownloaded | FileDownloaded; // => 00000101

which is equivalent to:

  00000001 // FileNotDownloaded
| 00000100 // FileDownloaded
----------
= 00000101 // (FileNotDownloaded | FileDownloaded)

Comparing Bitmasks:

One thing to keep in mind when checking against bitmasks:

Checking for exact equality:

Let's assume that status is initialized like this:

DownloadViewStatus status = FileNotDownloaded | FileDownloaded; // => 00000101

If you want to check if status equals FileNotDownloaded, you can use:

BOOL equals = (status == FileNotDownloaded); // => false

which is equivalent to:

   00000101 // (FileNotDownloaded | FileDownloaded)
== 00000100 // FileDownloaded
-----------
=  00000000 // false

Checking for "membership":

If you want to check if status merely contains FileNotDownloaded, you need to use:

BOOL contains = (status & FileNotDownloaded) != 0; // => true

   00000101 // (FileNotDownloaded | FileDownloaded)
&  00000100 // FileDownloaded
-----------
=  00000100 // FileDownloaded
!= 00000000 // 0
-----------
=  00000001 // 1 => true

See the subtle difference (and why your current "if"-expression is probably wrong)?

  • @Abizern: Thanks! Thought this question deserved a bit more explanation than had previously been provided. – Regexident Apr 23 '13 at 11:19
  • excellent answer! – horseshoe7 Nov 26 '13 at 11:01
  • 1
    Apple provides a wonderful pair of macros NS_ENUM and NS_OPTION for enum and bit mask declarations. Use them. See NSHipster site for some good descriptions. – uchuugaka Nov 29 '13 at 15:54
  • 2
    Fully aware of them. ;) (See Abizern's answer) Anyway, added a variation with NS_OPTIONS for the sake of completeness. – Regexident Dec 1 '13 at 20:25
  • 1
    Right. I see what you mean about overflows. Perhaps it should simply be ((status & FileNotDownloaded) == FileNotDownloaded) so tag there are only two results possible. – uchuugaka Jan 20 '14 at 23:40
18

While @Regexident has provided an excellent answer - I must mention the modern Objective-C way of declaring Enumerated options with NS_OPTIONS:

typedef NS_OPTIONS(NSUInteger, DownloadViewStatus) {
  FileNotDownloaded = 0,
  FileDownloading   = 1 << 0,
  FileDownloaded    = 1 << 1
};

Further Reference:

  • Yes the NS_ENUM and NS_OPTION macros are awesome. – uchuugaka Nov 29 '13 at 15:55
1
enum DownloadViewStatus {
  FileNotDownloaded = 1,
  FileDownloading = 2,
  FileDowloaded = 4
};

This will let you perform bitwise OR's and AND's effectively.

  • 4
    The standard way to define the values is 1 << 0, 1 << 1, 1 << 2 etc. This makes it clear you are working with bits and masks. – Mike Weller Apr 23 '13 at 10:58
  • 1
    nshipster.com/ns_enum-ns_options is worth reading – Ahmed Al Hafoudh Apr 23 '13 at 11:13
  • 1
    @AhmedAlHafoudh: The article doesn't however address OP's second problem: working with bitmasks (vs. simply declaring them). See my answer. – Regexident Apr 23 '13 at 11:15
0

Useful function you can use for bitmask checking to improve readability.

BOOL bitmaskContains(NSUInteger bitmask, NSUInteger contains) {
    return (bitmask & contains) != 0;
}

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