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I was looking at this very cool snippet and i came across this weird line in the js and deleting that prevent the function from being invoked

!+-+-+!+-+-+!+-+-+!+-+-+!+-+-+!+-+-+!+-+-+!+-+-+!
function(d, w){
   ...
}(document, window);

,i wrapped the function with ( ) as it supposed to be and it works as intended.

(function(d, w){
    ...
})(document, window);

so my question is what is that weird line and why does it work? my wild guest is that it is some kind IIFE...

marked as duplicate by deceze, apsillers, Eduardo, Lynn Crumbling, Nate Apr 23 '13 at 19:48

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • its not ! operator tricky .. ! – rab Apr 23 '13 at 13:21
  • 1
    To elaborate on the the duplicate: the +, -, and ! are all unary operators doing the same thing as the lone ! in the linked duplicate. – apsillers Apr 23 '13 at 13:21
  • @apsillers so those duplicates are unnecessary ? – MimiEAM Apr 23 '13 at 15:10
  • @MimiEAM Correct, only one +, -, or ! is needed for the function to be parsed as a function expression (rather than a function declaration). – apsillers Apr 23 '13 at 15:39
up vote 11 down vote accepted

And you are right, it is an Immediately-Invoked Function Expression (IIFE)

You can rewrite

!+-+-+!+-+-+!+-+-+!+-+-+!+-+-+!+-+-+!+-+-+!+-+-+!
function(d, w){
   ...
}(document, window);

to

!function() {
    ...
}()

and it still works. This is because ! is a unary operator (just like +, -, and ~ -- see https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/JavaScript/Guide/Expressions_and_Operators). After an unary operator an expression is expected (and evaluated!). The expression can be a function call.

However

!function() {
    ...
}()

is just another expression, so you can put another unary operator in front of it:

+!function() {
    ...
}()

You can continue this pattern as you wish.

Note: Invoking an anonymous function this way, ignores the return value of the function. So only use this, if you are not interested in the return value.

Edit: Added an excellent reference to http://benalman.com/news/2010/11/immediately-invoked-function-expression/ which Daff mentioned in his answer.

  • thank you for the clarification :) – MimiEAM Apr 23 '13 at 15:10

The trick is actually the single ! operator there (the entire first line actually does the same thing). This will work just as well:

!function(d, w){
   ...
}(document, window);

As always I can recommend Ben Almans great article on Immediately-Invoked Function Expressions

  • thank you, i wish i could accept both answer – MimiEAM Apr 23 '13 at 15:11

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