20

Let's say I've a string "12345" I should obtain all subsequence combinations of this string such as:

  1. --> 1 2 3 4 5
  2. --> 12 13 14 15 23 24 25 34 35 45
  3. --> 123 124 125 234 235 345
  4. --> 1234 1235 1245 1345 2345
  5. --> 12345

Please note that I grouped them in different number of chars but not changed their order. I need a method/function does that.

  • Is the example supposed to be exhaustive? That is, is there another criteria for picking ordered subsets? – outis Oct 24 '09 at 11:21
  • RC, sorry I'm editing it. There is no "6" at all... – AhmetB - Google Oct 24 '09 at 11:39
  • 1
    You should try to figure it out on your own. These kind of exercises will help you become a good programmer. – StackedCrooked Oct 24 '09 at 12:06
  • 1
    @StackedCrooked: Then again, the sole purpose of this site is to be a forum for asking questions. Why discourage people from doing that? – Jakob Oct 24 '09 at 14:28
  • 1
    @Amit: That does sound odd. T is right next to R on the keyboard, though: Maybe it was supposed to be "generic"? – Jakob Oct 25 '09 at 16:16

12 Answers 12

33

You want a powerset. Here are all the questions on StackOverflow that mention powersets or power sets.

Here is a basic implementation in python:

def powerset(s):
    n = len(s)
    masks = [1<<j for j in xrange(n)]
    for i in xrange(2**n):
        yield [s[j] for j in range(n) if (masks[j] & i)]


if __name__ == '__main__':
    for elem in powerset([1,2,3,4,5]):
        print elem

And here is its output:

[]
[1]
[2]
[1, 2]
[3]
[1, 3]
[2, 3]
[1, 2, 3]
[4]
[1, 4]
[2, 4]
[1, 2, 4]
[3, 4]
[1, 3, 4]
[2, 3, 4]
[1, 2, 3, 4]
[5]
[1, 5]
[2, 5]
[1, 2, 5]
[3, 5]
[1, 3, 5]
[2, 3, 5]
[1, 2, 3, 5]
[4, 5]
[1, 4, 5]
[2, 4, 5]
[1, 2, 4, 5]
[3, 4, 5]
[1, 3, 4, 5]
[2, 3, 4, 5]
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5]

Notice that its first result is the empty set. Change the iteration from this for i in xrange(2**n): to this for i in xrange(1, 2**n): if you want to skip an empty set.

Here is the code adapted to produce string output:

def powerset(s):
    n = len(s)
    masks = [1<<j for j in xrange(n)]
    for i in xrange(2**n):
        yield "".join([str(s[j]) for j in range(n) if (masks[j] & i)])

Edit 2009-10-24

Okay, I see you are partial to an implementation in Java. I don't know Java, so I'll meet you halfway and give you code in C#:

    static public IEnumerable<IList<T>> powerset<T>(IList<T> s)
    {
        int n = s.Count;
        int[] masks = new int[n];
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
            masks[i] = (1 << i);
        for (int i = 0; i < (1 << n); i++)
        {
            List<T> newList = new List<T>(n);
            for (int j = 0; j < n; j++)
                if ((masks[j] & i) != 0)
                    newList.Add(s[j]);
            yield return newList;
        }
    }
| improve this answer | |
  • 5
    Someone downvoted this -- why? Because I returned to this and added code in C# (and not Java!) to do what the OP asked? Sheesh. Glad I went the extra mile. – hughdbrown Oct 24 '09 at 20:29
  • 1
    Order could be important in the poster's sequence, and it might be that elements occur more than once. Thus, the power set may not really help that much. – PeterAllenWebb Oct 25 '09 at 3:59
  • @hughdbrown: The same thing happened with my answer. I can not realize the reason of downvote. – sergtk Oct 25 '09 at 8:56
  • 1
    @PeterAllenWebb: Interesting speculation, but not actually requirements of the OP. Not sure where you got the idea that having elements occur more than once was something the OP wanted. – hughdbrown Oct 25 '09 at 18:39
12

The simplest algorithm for generating subsets of a set of size N is to consider all binary numbers using N bits. Each position in the number represents an element from the set. If a bit in the number is 1, the corresponding set element is in the subset, otherwise the element isn't in the subset. Since the bits in a number are ordered, this preserves the ordering of the original set.

References:

  1. "Efficiently Enumerating the Subsets of a Set"; Loughry, Hemert and Schoofs
  2. "Generating Subsets"; Stony Brook Algorithm Repository
| improve this answer | |
  • And it's worth pointing out that this same technique can easily be adapted to sequences, rather than sets. Each of the N bits would correspond to one of the N sequence members which you would either take or leave according to whether the bit is 0 or 1. – PeterAllenWebb Oct 25 '09 at 4:09
  • 1
    @whoever is downvoting: why? (meta.stackexchange.com/questions/135/…). A sequence is basically a set of pairs, the first of which is an integer. As noted in the answer, the method preserves ordering, so if you start with a sequence, you get sequences. – outis Apr 8 '10 at 1:25
11

way way cleaner approach can be achieved through recursion as follows.

Public class StrManipulation{

    public static void combinations(String suffix,String prefix){
        if(prefix.length()<0)return;
        System.out.println(suffix);
        for(int i=0;i<prefix.length();i++)
         combinations(suffix+prefix.charAt(i),prefix.substring(i+1,prefix.length()));
    }

    public static void main (String args[]){
        combinations("","12345");
        }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • can it be improved like using string builder or char array instead? – HendraWD Jan 12 '17 at 8:34
10

In C++ given the following routine:

template <typename Iterator>
bool next_combination(const Iterator first, Iterator k, const Iterator last)
{
   /* Credits: Mark Nelson http://marknelson.us */
   if ((first == last) || (first == k) || (last == k))
      return false;
   Iterator i1 = first;
   Iterator i2 = last;
   ++i1;
   if (last == i1)
      return false;
   i1 = last;
   --i1;
   i1 = k;
   --i2;
   while (first != i1)
   {
      if (*--i1 < *i2)
      {
         Iterator j = k;
         while (!(*i1 < *j)) ++j;
         std::iter_swap(i1,j);
         ++i1;
         ++j;
         i2 = k;
         std::rotate(i1,j,last);
         while (last != j)
         {
            ++j;
            ++i2;
         }
         std::rotate(k,i2,last);
         return true;
      }
   }
   std::rotate(first,k,last);
   return false;
}

You can then proceed to do the following:

std::string s = "12345";
for(std::size_t i = 1; i <= s.size(); ++i)
{
   do
   {
      std::cout << std::string(s.begin(),s.begin() + i) << std::endl;
   }
   while(next_combination(s.begin(),s.begin() + i,s.end()));
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Wow that sounds cool but terrifying. Cannot be any recursive or iterated answers? I don't know much about STL or C Iterators – AhmetB - Google Oct 24 '09 at 12:01
8

using python, the itertools module defines a combinations() method which does just what you need.

from itertools import *
list(combinations( '12345', 2 ))

will give you:

[('1', '2'), ('1', '3'), ('1', '4'), ('1', '5'), ('2', '3'), ('2', '4'), ('2', '5'), ('3', '4'), ('3', '5'), ('4', '5')]
| improve this answer | |
  • Pretty great but I can't port it to Java since I don't know much about Python. There is no "combinations" function in Java. – AhmetB - Google Oct 24 '09 at 12:29
  • 1
    +1 compensation vote, OP never explicitly wrote in the question why it shouldn't be in Python so it seems unfair to downvote a somewhat correct answer – Spoike Oct 24 '09 at 14:27
3

You can use the following class for this (in Java):

class Combinations {

  String input;
  StringBuilder cur;

  private void next(int pos, int reminder) {
    cur.append(input.charAt(pos));

    if (reminder == 1) {
      System.out.println(cur);
    } else {
      for (int i = pos + 1; i + reminder - 1 <= input.length(); i++)
        next(i, reminder - 1);
    }
    cur.deleteCharAt(cur.length() - 1);
  }

  public void generate(String input) {
    cur = new StringBuilder();
    this.input = input;
    for (int length = 1; length <= input.length(); length++)
      for (int pos = 0; pos + length <= input.length(); pos++)
        next(pos, length);
  }
}

To run your example use the following code:

new Combinations().generate("12345");

The order of the output is the same as in example. It does not require to store all subsets and then sort them to obtain the order you described.

| improve this answer | |
3

Java implementation of outis' answer, taking the input strings as args.

import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.List;

public class Combo {

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    List<String> results = new ArrayList<String>();
    for ( int i = 1; i <= (1<<(args.length))-1; i++ ) {
      StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
      for ( int j = 0; j < args.length; j++ ) {
        if ( (i & (1<<j)) != 0) {
          builder.append(args[j]);
        }
      }
      results.add(builder.toString());
    }
    System.out.println( results );
  }
}

Here's a run.

> javac Combo.java
> java Combo A B C
[A, B, AB, C, AC, BC, ABC]
| improve this answer | |
1

The code to generate all possible combinations of strings is given in java. The all possible combinations of string of length 4 is 2 ^ 4 (2 raised to the power 4). In general for a string of length n the possible combinations are 2 ^ n (2 raised to the power n). Hence the code:

    class Perms
    {
    public void permsOfString(String a)
      {
     int x = 1;

     /* 
          Computes 2^string length

     */

     for(int i = 0;i<a.length() ;i++)
     {
         x = x * 2;
     }
     /*
            Iterate through all the possible combinations using a binary value of the number

      */
     for(int i = 1 ;i<x;i++)
     {

         String binStr = Integer.toBinaryString(i); // Convert i to binary string 
         for(int j = binStr.length() ; j <  a.length() ;j++)
         {
             binStr = "0"+binStr; // left pad with 0s
         }
   /*loop through the binary string if a character at the string is '1' note the    index,then display the character of the given string with that index */

          for(int k = 0; k <binStr.length();k++)
          {
             if(binStr.charAt(k) == '0') continue;
             else
             {
                 System.out.print(a.charAt(k));
             }

          }
         System.out.println();

     }

    }
    public static void main(String[]s)
  {
Perms p = new Perms();
p.permsOfString("abcd");
   }
} 
| improve this answer | |
0

Adrien Plisson's answer shows how one retrieves all subsequences of a specified length in Python (for arbitrary sequence data types). The OP specifies that he works with strings, and that he wants all subsequences. Thus, using itertools.combinations we define:

>>> from itertools import combinations
>>> def subseq_combos(inp):
...     return (''.join(s) for r in range(len(inp) + 1) for s in combinations(inp, r))
... 
>>> list(subseq_combos('12345'))
['', '1', '2', '3', '4', '5', '12', '13', '14', '15', '23', '24', '25', '34', '35', '45', '123', '124', '125', '134', '135', '145', '234', '235', '245', '345', '1234', '1235', '1245', '1345', '2345', '12345']

(If the empty subsequence should be omitted, then use range(1, len(inp) + 1)).)

| improve this answer | |
  • Pretty great but I can't port it to Java since I don't know much about Python. – AhmetB - Google Oct 24 '09 at 12:28
0

oops, wrong answer:

Subsequences of a certain length in Python:

def subseqs(seq, length):
    for i in xrange(len(seq) - length + 1):
        yield seq[i:i+length]

Used like this:

for each in subseqs("hello", 3):
    print each

prints:

hel
ell
llo

To generate all subsequences do this:

for i in xrange(len("hello")):
    for each in subseqs("hello", i + 1):
        print each

prints:

h
e
l
l
o
he
el
ll
lo
hel
ell
llo
hell
ello
hello

Mick.

Now I see, you wanted subsets, not sublists.

| improve this answer | |
0

C implementation

//Usage
combinations((char*)"",(char*)"12346897909787");


void combinations(char* suffix,char* prefix){
    if(NULL ==prefix || NULL == suffix){ return ;}
    int prefixLen = strlen(prefix);
    printf("\n[%s]",suffix);
    int slen  = strlen(suffix);
    char* s   = (char*)malloc(slen+2);
    s[slen+1] = '\0';
    for(int i=0;i<prefixLen;i++){
        strcpy(s,suffix);
        s[slen]  = prefix[i];
        int npfl = prefixLen-(i+1);
        char* p  = (char*) malloc(npfl+1);
        p[npfl]  = '\0';
        strcpy(p,prefix+i+1);
        combinations(s,p);
        free(p);
    }
    free(s);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • For C, you would probably want an iterative version instead; let the user handle memory management. – yyny Jan 3 '17 at 20:58
0

C++ solution:

#include<iostream>
#include<string>

using namespace std;

int sub[10];

void next(int max, int length) {

    int pos = length - 1;

    //find first digit that can be increased
    while(pos >= 0)
    {
        if(sub[pos] == max - (length - 1 - pos))
            pos--;

        else
            break;
    }

        sub[pos]++; //increase digit

        //update other digits
        for(int a = pos+1; a < length; a++)
            sub[a] = sub[a-1] + 1;

}

int main()
{
    string word;
    cin >> word; 

    int max = word.length() - 1; //max value


    for(int n=1; n <= max+1; n++)
    {

        cout << n << "\n----\n";

        for(int i = 0; i < n; i++)
        {
            sub[i] = i;
        }

        for(int a = 0; ; a++)
        {               
            for(int b=0; b < n; b++)
                cout << word[sub[b]];

            cout << '\n';

            if(sub[0] == max - (n - 1))
                break;

            else
                next(max, n); //maximum value and last position
        }   

        cout << '\n';

    }   


    return 0;
 }
> for input :Sigma
> output is
1
----
s
i
g
m
a

2
----
si
sg
sm
sa
ig
im
ia
gm
ga
ma

3
----
sig
sim
sia
sgm
sga
sma
igm
iga
ima
gma

4
----
sigm
siga
sima
sgma
igma

5
----
sigma
| improve this answer | |

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