50

I'm trying to overwrite values that are found in TYPE1 with values that are found in TYPE2.

I wrote this SQL to try it out, but for some reason it isn't updating:

select * from stuff

update stuff
set TYPE1 = TYPE2
where TYPE1 is null;

update stuff
set TYPE1 = TYPE2
where TYPE1 ='Blank';

http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!3/a4733/17

Any reason why my values in TYPE1 are not updating?

10 Answers 10

73

This works for me

select * from stuff

update stuff
set TYPE1 = TYPE2
where TYPE1 is null;

update stuff
set TYPE1 = TYPE2
where TYPE1 ='Blank';

select * from stuff
2
  • 1
    Yep, you're right. But after running the update statements once, I would run the select statement again... but no change. Is there a new instance of a fiddle after every run?
    – neuquen
    Commented Apr 23, 2013 at 23:11
  • 2
    @Keven Yes, each SQLFiddle execution is independent of the previous run. Commented Apr 24, 2013 at 0:06
58
UPDATE a
SET a.column1 = b.column2
FROM myTable a 
INNER JOIN myTable b
on a.myID = b.myID

in order for both "a" and "b" to work, both aliases must be defined

5
  • 2
    the accepted answer works, but this is is a bit more direct and to the point
    – hanzolo
    Commented May 26, 2016 at 18:38
  • I subtracted a point because this doesn't actually answer my original question. I wanted to update a value from TYPE1 with the value from TYPE2 IN THE SAME TABLE.
    – neuquen
    Commented Nov 22, 2016 at 21:07
  • 6
    Actually the example above answers the question because the JOIN is done on the same table as the FROM statement, if you look carefully "myTable" is referenced twice. It's just a little more verbose than the accepted answer.
    – mastazi
    Commented Mar 8, 2017 at 4:17
  • @mastazi Thanks for pointing that out! I completely glossed over the fact that it was the same table.
    – neuquen
    Commented Jun 13, 2017 at 1:11
  • 2
    This is the best answer for sure. This is very useful when you're taking data in a column and manipulating it before putting in another column. For example I'm taking my PART_NUMBER column and removing the dashes from it and placing it in MOD_PART_NUMBER. Best way to do this! Commented Aug 28, 2019 at 14:56
37
UPDATE TABLE_NAME SET COLUMN_A = COLUMN_B;

Much easier. At least on Oracle SQL, i don't know if this works on other dialects as well.

5
  • 3
    Yeah, works for SQL Server as well (so your answer is perfectly valid for this question). Commented Feb 9, 2018 at 10:30
  • 1
    I got error: Subquery returned more than 1 value. This is not permitted when the subquery follows =, !=, <, <= , >, >= or when the subquery is used as an expression. Commented Feb 21, 2018 at 17:04
  • 1
    This should be the answer. Worked for me. With huge concat of 5 columns into one field.
    – JustJohn
    Commented Mar 22, 2020 at 1:12
  • worked in postgres. Also it easy to combine with another query like UPDATE table_name SET column_1 = cast(split_part(column_2, ' ', 1) as float); Commented Jun 5, 2020 at 2:46
  • simple and works
    – MMezlini
    Commented Nov 29, 2021 at 15:22
3

You put select query before update queries, so you just see initial data. Put select * from stuff; to the end of list.

3

This answer about updating column from a part of another column in the same table.

update T1
set domainname = (New value) --Example: (SELECT LEFT(TableName.col, CHARINDEX('@',TableName.col)-1) STRIPPED_STRING FROM TableName where TableName.col = T2.Emp_ID)
from TableName T1
INNER JOIN
    TableName T2
ON 
    T1.ID= T2.ID;
1
2
update TABLE_1 a set COLUMN_1 = (select COLUMN_2 from TABLE_1 b where a.ID = b.ID)
1
  • SET or WITH expected, got 'a'
    – Greg
    Commented Oct 23, 2019 at 15:33
1

Your select statement was before the update statement see Updated fiddle

0
UPDATE `tbl_user` SET `name`=concat('tbl_user.first_name','tbl_user.last_name') WHERE student_roll>965
0

If you need to make an operation on a specific column:

update courses set hours = days * 5

0

You can simply do this .

Update TableName SET Column1=Column2 where id=id

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