3

I am working on a large project using C language, which has a lot of preprocessor macros: #ifdef/#if. The macros are defined in makefile.

In order to get the clean code, I modified the makefile to use "gcc -E". But the gcc preprocessor would expand the included header file as well, which I do not expect.

Is there any method to get rid of the #ifdef/#if without expand the included header files? I searched GCC options but not find an answer yet.

An example:

    #include "a.h"
    #ifdef ABC
    func()
    #else
    func(a)
    #endif
    {
    ...
    }

In makefile, this source is compiled with -DABC, I am looking for a method to change the file to:

    #include "a.h"
    func()
    {
    ...
    }
  • 1
    1. I don't see how this is useful. 2. If you really need this, then Dhy don't you just make a separate header file with the defines, without any header inclusion, then include this auxiliary header in the other one? – user529758 Apr 24 '13 at 4:44
  • I think the point large project makes it difficult – abasu Apr 24 '13 at 5:00
  • Yes, this project has too many files to do this kind of change. – Jason Ye Apr 24 '13 at 5:22
  • 1
    you could put #ifndef _OMIT_HEADERS_,#endif around the included header files, and then use gcc -E -D_OMIT_HEADERS_? – steabert Apr 24 '13 at 5:23
  • The initial purpose of this is to collect some source code metrics of the project, like the cyclomatic complexity. The calculation tools like CCCC can not recognize the preprocess macros. – Jason Ye Apr 24 '13 at 5:25
2

If you only want to remove preprocessor conditionals from your code you can use unifdef :

unifdef -DFOO header.h
  • 1
    Or sunifdef (Son of unifdef) or Coan. – Jonathan Leffler Apr 24 '13 at 10:01
  • 1
    I tried sunifdef and it works fine. Well, the code can become much cleaner. Thank you! – Jason Ye Apr 25 '13 at 3:07

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.