81

Can someone please explain to me how the compiler does not complain in the first casting, but does complain in the second?

interface I1 { }
interface I2 { }
class C1 implements I1 { }
class C2 implements I2 { }

public class Test{
     public static void main(String[] args){
        C1 o1 = new C1();
        C2 o2 = new C2();
        Integer o3 = new Integer(4);

        I2 x = (I2)o1; //compiler does not complain
        I2 y = (I2)o3; //compiler complains here !!
     }
}
7
  • 8
    By running this, you will encounter ClassCastException, which is a RuntimeException. Apr 24, 2013 at 7:57
  • 4
    @BuhakeSindi you are wrong
    – Andremoniy
    Apr 24, 2013 at 8:07
  • 2
    @BuhakeSindi The OP said that the compiler complained suggesting to me that you do not get a chance to run this.
    – emory
    Apr 24, 2013 at 12:26
  • @emory, even if he could get it to compile by fixing the item that had a compiler error, the line above it would have caused a ClassCastException. Apr 24, 2013 at 13:25
  • 1
    @BuhakeSindi You are wrong because you speak the things that you should not. The water is wet. But it is wrong to speak about this issue in this context. Ok? Obviously, the questioner know about it because he does an experiment.
    – Val
    Apr 24, 2013 at 15:15

4 Answers 4

152

When you cast o1 and o3 with (I2), you tell the compiler that the class of the object is actually a subclass of its declared type, and that this subclass implements I2.

The Integer class is final, so o3 cannot be an instance of a subclass of Integer: the compiler knows that you're lying. C1 however is not final, so o1 could be an instance of a subtype of C1 that implements I2.

If you make C1 final, the compiler will complain too:

interface I1 { }
interface I2 { }
final class C1 implements I1 { }
class C2 implements I2 { }

public class Test{
     public static void main(){
        C1 o1 = new C1();
        C2 o2 = new C2();
        Integer o3 = new Integer(4);

        I2 y = (I2)o3; //compiler complains here !!
        I2 x = (I2)o1; //compiler complains too
     }
}
4
  • 1
    "Integer is final, so o3 as no chance of being of interface I2" That's pretty much wrong in this form. Not the meaning, but the phrasing.
    – Powerslave
    Apr 24, 2013 at 10:51
  • 1
    @WilQu I wasn't complaining about the typo, but the phrasing of the answer. If you take a look below, you'll see how much clearer Etienne's phrasing of the same thing is. Yours can be misunderstandable, thus misleading as you didn't mention (for example) that the class of Integer is final (which is obvious to me and you but probably not to everyone) and the "has no chance of being an interface" part does not carry too much information; in fact the info in question is hidden in the second sentence. One might even think that final classes can't implement inferfaces which is not true.
    – Powerslave
    Apr 25, 2013 at 6:24
  • @Powerslave thanks for your comments, I edited my answer again. I tried to add more explanation, I hope it does not make my answer even more confusing.
    – WilQu
    Apr 25, 2013 at 12:42
  • @WilQu Excellent! Turned out to be a very nice explanation :)
    – Powerslave
    Apr 25, 2013 at 13:36
37

According to JLS chapter 5

5.5.1. Reference Type Casting

Given a compile-time reference type S (source) and a compile-time reference type T (target), a casting conversion exists from S to T if no compile-time errors occur due to the following rules. If T is an interface type:

If S is not a final class (§8.1.1), then, if there exists a supertype X of T, and a supertype Y of S, such that both X and Y are provably distinct parameterized types, and that the erasures of X and Y are the same, a compile-time error occurs.

Otherwise, the cast is always legal at compile time (because even if S does not implement T, a subclass of S might).

If S is a final class (§8.1.1), then S must implement T, or a compile-time error occurs.

0
25

That's because class Integer is final and C1 is not. Thus, an Integer object cannot implement I2, while a C1 object could if it is an instance of a subclass of C1 that implements I2.

0
15

According to JLS 5.5.1 - Reference Type casting, the rule(s) apply:

  • If T is a class type, then either |S| <: |T|, or |T| <: |S|. Otherwise, a compile-time error occurs.

    I2 y = (I2)o3; //compiler complains here !!

In this case, an Integer and I2 are unrelated in any way, so a compile-time error occurs. Also, because Integer is final, there is no relation between Integer and I2.

I2 and I1 can be related due to both being a marker interface (there are no contract).

As for the compiled code, the rule follows:

  • If S is not a final class (§8.1.1), then, if there exists a supertype X of T, and a supertype Y of S, such that both X and Y are provably distinct parameterized types, and that the erasures of X and Y are the same, a compile-time error occurs.

S is o1 and T is I2.

Hope this helps.

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