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I'm trying to detect when a new file is created a directory or when an existing file is modified in a directory.

I tried searching for a script that would do this (preferably in python or bash) but came up short. My environment is linux with Python 2.6

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  • Which operating system do you use? – Andrey Vlasovskikh Oct 24 '09 at 19:37
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    Linux with Python 2.6. As mentioned above. Specifically, Fedora Core 2. Thanks. – Jake Oct 24 '09 at 19:39
  • @Jake: Do not comment on your own question. Please UPDATE your question with new facts and delete your comment. – S.Lott Oct 24 '09 at 21:32
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    He commented on a comment, not on his question... and update? Why, it was all there (except for the Fedora bit, but why would that be significant...). – Jürgen A. Erhard Jan 4 '10 at 3:44
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You can use gio which is the Filesystem part of GLib (In GLib's python bindings)

import gio

def directory_changed(monitor, file1, file2, evt_type):
   if (evt_type in (gio.FILE_MONITOR_EVENT_CREATED,
       gio.FILE_MONITOR_EVENT_DELETED)):
       print "Changed:", file1, file2, evt_type

gfile = gio.File(".")
monitor = gfile.monitor_directory(gio.FILE_MONITOR_NONE, None)
monitor.connect("changed", directory_changed)

however, your program must be running a GLib mainloop for the events to arrive. One quick way to test that is by using:

import glib
ml = glib.MainLoop()
ml.run()

GLib is a high-level library which is well suited for Applications. You don't have to care about which underlying system it uses for the file monitoring.


I now see you use Fedora Core 2. Really version 2? That might be too old to use GIO in GLib. Pyinotify that has been mentioned might be a better solution, although less portable.

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  • Too GNOME-ish! I don't like that, it's just an unnecessary dependency. – Andrey Vlasovskikh Oct 24 '09 at 19:49
  • Andrey: It is just GLib. Do you have it installed (if you're using Linux) or not? – u0b34a0f6ae Oct 24 '09 at 19:52
  • @kaizer.se I'm a Linux minimalist, I use wmii as a window manager and don't like various GNOME stuff. (But actually yes, I have glib installed because of udev, avahi, mc, ... ;) – Andrey Vlasovskikh Oct 24 '09 at 19:58
  • @Andrey: You may be right in that GLib is too big. It is a convenient interface, but to very many things. – u0b34a0f6ae Oct 24 '09 at 20:22
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If you're using Linux, you may try pyinotify that acts like an object-oriented wrapper around the inotify(7) system calls. The project website contains quite straightforward tutorials and examples.

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  • +1, Another interesting solution – Nadia Alramli Oct 24 '09 at 19:59
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If you can use PyQt, there's QFileSystemWatcher that does just this.

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There are also Python bindings for gamin.

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