206

This is the CSS:

div {
    width: 0;
    height: 0;
    border: 180px solid red;
    border-radius: 180px;
}

How does it produce the circle below?

Enter image description here

Suppose, if a rectangle width is 180 pixels and height is 180 pixels then it would appear like this:

Enter image description here

After applying border-radius 30 pixels it would appear like this:

Enter image description here

The rectangle is becoming smaller, that is, almost going to disappear if the radius size increases.

So, how does a border of 180 pixels with height/width-> 0px become a circle with a radius of 180 pixels?

  • 14
    It's a 0x0 object with a 180 pixel border around it which has rounded corners. So the rounded corners are quadrants of a circle. – Kaz Apr 24 '13 at 20:18
  • i have a silly question in my mind why you want to make circle with border??? we can easily make circle with width and height so why we do with border – The Mechanic Apr 26 '13 at 4:46
  • 7
    FYI, for circle making, use <code>border-radius: 50%</code> - makes it easier to adjust just the width/height when getting your layout right. – David Gilbertson Apr 30 '13 at 21:19
  • Yes ladies, it's a math – Medet Tleukabiluly Jan 8 '16 at 4:52
371

How does a border of 180 pixels with height/width-> 0px become a circle with a radius of 180 pixels?

Let's reformulate that into two questions:

Where do width and height actually apply?

Let's have a look at the areas of a typical box (source):

W3C: Areas of a typical box

The height and width apply only on content, if the correct box model is being used (no quirks mode, no old Internet Explorer).

Where does border-radius apply?

The border-radius applies on the border-edge. If there is neither padding nor border it will directly affect your content edge, which results in your third example.

What does this mean for our border-radius/circle?

This means that your CSS rules result in a box that only consists of a border. Your rules state that this border should have a maximum width of 180 pixels on every side, while on the other hand it should have a maximum radius of the same size:

Example image

In the picture, the actual content of your element (the little black dot) is really non-existent. If you didn't apply any border-radius you would end up with the green box. The border-radius gives you the blue circle.

It gets easier to understand if you apply the border-radius only to two corners:

#silly-circle{
    width:0; height:0;
    border: 180px solid red;
    border-top-left-radius: 180px;
    border-top-right-radius: 180px;
}

Border only applied on two corners

Since in your example the size and radius for all corners/borders are equal you get a circle.

Further resources

References

Demonstrations

  • Please open the demo below, which shows how the border-radius affects the border (think of the inner blue box as the content box, the inner black border as the padding border, the empty space as the padding and the giant red border as the, well, border). Intersections between the inner box and the red border would usually affect the content edge.

var all = $('#TopLeft, #TopRight, #BottomRight, #BottomLeft');

all.on('change keyup', function() {
  $('#box').css('border' + this.id + 'Radius', (this.value || 0) + "%");
  $('#' + this.id + 'Text').val(this.value + "%");
});

$('#total').on('change keyup', function() {
  $('#box').css('borderRadius', (this.value || 0) + "%");
  $('#' + this.id + 'Text').val(this.value + "%");
  all.val(this.value);
  all.each(function(){$('#' + this.id + 'Text').val(this.value + "%");})
});
#box {
  margin:auto;
  width: 32px;
  height: 32px;
  border: 100px solid red;
  padding: 32px;
  transition: border-radius 1s ease;
  -moz-transition: border-radius 1s ease;
  -webkit-transition: border-radius 1s ease;
  -o-transition: border-radius 1s ease;
  -ms-transition: border-radius 1s ease;
}
#chooser{margin:auto;}
#innerBox {
  width: 100%;
  height: 100%;
  border: 1px solid blue;
}
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/2.1.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<div id="box">
  <div id="innerBox"></div>
</div>
<table id="chooser">    
  <tr>
    <td><label for="total">Total</label></td>
    <td><input id="total" value="0" type="range" min="0" max="100" step="1" /></td>
    <td><input readonly id="totalText" value="0" type="text" /></td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td><label for="TopLeft">Top-Left</label></td>
    <td><input id="TopLeft" value="0" type="range" min="0" max="100" step="1" /></td>
    <td><input readonly id="TopLeftText" value="0" type="text" /></td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td><label for="TopRight">Top right</label></td>
    <td><input id="TopRight" value="0" type="range" min="0" max="100" step="1" /></td>
    <td><input readonly id="TopRightText" value="0" type="text" /></td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td><label for="BottomRight">Bottom right</label></td>
    <td><input id="BottomRight" value="0" type="range" min="0" max="100" step="1" /></td>
    <td><input readonly id="BottomRightText" value="0" type="text" /></td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td><label for="BottomLeft">Bottom left</label></td>
    <td><input id="BottomLeft" value="0" type="range" min="0" max="100" step="1" /></td>
    <td><input readonly id="BottomLeftText" value="0" type="text" /></td>
  </tr>
  <caption><code>border-radius</code> values. All values are in percent.</caption>
</table>
<p>This demo uses a box with a <code>width/height</code> of 32px, a <code>padding</code> of 32px, and a <code>border</code> of 100px.</p>

  • I don't think css3-background makes any references to css3-box (css3-box is pending a rewrite). – BoltClock Apr 26 '13 at 4:06
  • @BoltClock: I thought that css3-box would define the edges. There's only a reference to css2.1-box in the introduction (non-normative), and the given image is also there, so css3-box isn't really needed to understand border-radius (what changes are to expect in the rewrite of css3-box?). – Zeta Apr 26 '13 at 4:39
  • @Zeta i have a silly question in my mind why you want to make circle with border??? we can easily make circle with width and height so why we do with border – The Mechanic Apr 26 '13 at 4:46
  • 1
    @Sarfaraz: Have a look at the OP's question: "So, how does a border of 180px with height/width-> 0px becomes a circle with a radius of 180px?". I simply answered the question. There are other ways to create a circle, but OP was only interested how this specific method works. – Zeta Apr 26 '13 at 4:55
  • @Zeta: I'm not sure what exactly will be changed, but given that that WD hasn't been updated in 6 years, I suspect a lot of it will be. I do know that section 11 (overflow family of properties) now lives in its own module, css-overflow-3, but that hasn't been reflected in the ED yet. You'll see plenty of issues in the ED, but I imagine it isn't an exhaustive list: dev.w3.org/csswg/css3-box – BoltClock Apr 26 '13 at 5:04
94

Demo

Let's examine the question in another way with this picture demonstration:

Let's see first how border radius is produced?

To produce radius it takes two sides of its border. If you set border-radius to 50 pixels then it would take 25 pixels from one side and 25 pixels from another side.

Enter image description here

And taking 25 pixels from each side it would produce like this:

div{
    width: 0px;
    height: 0px;
    border: 180px solid red;
    border-radius: 0 50px 0 0;
}

Enter image description here

Now see how much can it take maximum of square to apply on one corner?

It can take up to 180 pixels from top and 180 pixels from right. Then it would produce like this:

div{
    width: 0px;
    height: 0px;
    border: 180px solid red;
    border-radius: 0 180px 0 0;
}

Enter image description here

And see this how does it produce if we set non-equal value of radius?

Suppose, if you apply border radius only to two corners unequally:

  • top-right-corner to 180 pixels

  • bottom-right-corner to 100 pixels

Then it would take

  • top-right: 90 pixels from the top and 90 pixels from the right

  • bottom-right: 50 pixels from the right and 50 pixels from the bottom

Then it would produce like this

div{
    width: 0px;
    height: 0px;
    border: 180px solid red;
    border-radius: 0 180px 100px 0;
}

Enter image description here

How much maximum of its border can it take of square to apply on all sides? And see how does it produce a circle?

It can take up to half of the border-size, that is, 180 pixels / 2 = 90 pixels. Then it would produce a circle like this

div{
    width: 0px;
    height: 0px;
    border: 180px solid red;
    border-radius: 180px;
}

Enter image description here

Why does it take only half of the square to apply on all sides?

Because all corners have to set their radius value equally.

Taking equal parts of its border, it produces a circle.

  • 7
    Actually the current version of this answer takes it a little bit to far. The question is simply "how does this CSS create a circle", not "how does border-radius work in general", so while technically correct it's a little bit to much. Also you could reformat the question and put actual code into code environments. – Zeta Apr 25 '13 at 12:01
3

Borders are the outer box of any content and if you apply radius on it, it will simply produce the circular edge.

3

I think that it initially creates rectangle with height and width = 180px and then make curve with given radius like 30px with each corner. So it sets border with given radius.

1

Both .a and .b will give the identical output.

Q. Why did I used width: 360px; height: 360px;?

A. border: 180px solid red; in .a works like border-width: 180px 180px 180px 180px; /* Top Right Bottom Left */.

Hope this fiddle helps you to understand the concept.

.a{
    width: 0;
    height: 0;
    border: 180px solid red;
    border-radius: 180px;
}
.b{
    background:red;
    width: 360px;
    height: 360px;
    border-radius: 180px;
}
  • 9
    Huh? "How does .a work?" "Here's a comparison between .a and .b" I'm not sure what you're trying to say here. – BoltClock Apr 28 '13 at 10:10

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.