42

How can I divide a numpy array row by the sum of all values in this row?

This is one example. But I'm pretty sure there is a fancy and much more efficient way of doing this:

import numpy as np
e = np.array([[0., 1.],[2., 4.],[1., 5.]])
for row in xrange(e.shape[0]):
    e[row] /= np.sum(e[row])

Result:

array([[ 0.        ,  1.        ],
       [ 0.33333333,  0.66666667],
       [ 0.16666667,  0.83333333]])
79

Method #1: use None (or np.newaxis) to add an extra dimension so that broadcasting will behave:

>>> e
array([[ 0.,  1.],
       [ 2.,  4.],
       [ 1.,  5.]])
>>> e/e.sum(axis=1)[:,None]
array([[ 0.        ,  1.        ],
       [ 0.33333333,  0.66666667],
       [ 0.16666667,  0.83333333]])

Method #2: go transpose-happy:

>>> (e.T/e.sum(axis=1)).T
array([[ 0.        ,  1.        ],
       [ 0.33333333,  0.66666667],
       [ 0.16666667,  0.83333333]])

(You can drop the axis= part for conciseness, if you want.)

Method #3: (promoted from Jaime's comment)

Use the keepdims argument on sum to preserve the dimension:

>>> e/e.sum(axis=1, keepdims=True)
array([[ 0.        ,  1.        ],
       [ 0.33333333,  0.66666667],
       [ 0.16666667,  0.83333333]])
  • I don't see how you can drop the axis=1. Without the axis argument, sum() returns the sum of all the values in the array. – Warren Weckesser Apr 24 '13 at 23:26
  • 23
    In numpy 1.7 there is a keepdims argument that lets you do e/e.sum(axis=1, keepdims=True) – Jaime Apr 24 '13 at 23:33
  • 2
    @WarrenWeckesser: I didn't say you could drop the 1 part, I said you could drop the axis= part. – DSM Apr 24 '13 at 23:45
  • Ah, I misunderstood what you meant. – Warren Weckesser Apr 24 '13 at 23:50
  • 1
    Could you explicitly explain the [:,None] notation? I see the change it makes, but don't get the coding convention. – Michael Aug 7 '14 at 18:26
5

You can do it mathematically as enter image description here.

Here, E is your original matrix and D is a diagonal matrix where each entry is the sum of the corresponding row in E. If you're lucky enough to have an invertible D, this is a pretty mathematically convenient way to do things.

In numpy:

import numpy as np

diagonal_entries = [sum(e[row]) for row in range(e.shape[0])]
D = np.diag(diagonal_entries)
D_inv = np.linalg.inv(D)
e = np.dot(e, D_inv)

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