I'm trying to do this, but it's not working like I'd expect.

(I'm using the AMD option)

//logger.ts
export class Logger {

    static log(message: string) {
        //do stuff
    }
}

//main.ts
import logger = module('services/logger');
logger.log("test"); //The property 'log' does not exist on value of type '"logger"'
logger.Logger.log(); //works

How do you do logger.log()?

  • that should work fine, I have similar code working ( perhaps the TS versioning solved it ) – Sam Vloeberghs Jan 11 '16 at 15:35
up vote 111 down vote accepted

You can import classes directly, which allows you to have the usage you want.

// usage
import { Logger } from 'path/logger.ts'
Logger.Log();

And the definition stays the same.

// path/logger.ts
export class Logger {

    static Log() {
        ...
    }
}

This answer was correct at time of posting. It is now deprecated. See Dimitris' answer below for a better current solution.

Using a class, you can't. You're always going to have to call {module}.{class}.{function}

But you can drop the class altogether and just call {module}.{function}:

// services/logger.ts
export function log(message:string){
 // do stuff
}

//main.ts
import logger = module('services/logger');
logger.log("test"); // Should work
  • The changes to how internal modules contribute to the type system aren't relevant here. – Ryan Cavanaugh Apr 25 '13 at 7:15
  • I wasn't clear if it was only internal modules that were changing. Thanks - I'll update. – JcFx Apr 25 '13 at 7:17
  • 1
    I would prefer to access through a class wrapper, but I don't want to have to do module.class.function, I wanted the import to alias directly to the class. – Kal_Torak Apr 25 '13 at 17:02
  • 1
    why is this the accepted answer? The answer below works perfectly fine! – Sam Vloeberghs Jan 11 '16 at 15:33
  • 2
    @SamVloeberghs Because it was correct at the time of asking. The answer below describes a feature added to TypeScript more recently. – JcFx Jan 11 '16 at 16:47

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.