147

From the doc,

Modes 'r+', 'w+' and 'a+' open the file for updating (note that 'w+' truncates the file). Append 'b' to the mode to open the file in binary mode, on systems that differentiate between binary and text files; on systems that don’t have this distinction, adding the 'b' has no effect.

and here

w+ : Opens a file for both writing and reading. Overwrites the existing file if the file exists. If the file does not exist, creates a new file for reading and writing.

But, how to read a file open with w+?

  • 11
    I found this diagram quite useful. – Ritwik Jan 5 '18 at 7:09
91

Let's say you're opening the file with a with statement like you should be. Then you'd do something like this to read from your file:

with open('somefile.txt', 'w+') as f:
    # Note that f has now been truncated to 0 bytes, so you'll only
    # be able to read data that you write after this point
    f.write('somedata\n')
    f.seek(0)  # Important: return to the top of the file before reading, otherwise you'll just read an empty string
    data = f.read() # Returns 'somedata\n'

Note the f.seek(0) -- if you forget this, the f.read() call will try to read from the end of the file, and will return an empty string.

  • 1
    what does "truncating to 0 bytes" mean? – Nasif Imtiaz Ohi Jan 5 '18 at 23:49
  • 8
    @NasifImtiazOhi - The Python docs say that w+ will "overwrite the existing file if the file exists". So as soon as you open a file with w+, it is now an empty file: it contains 0 bytes. If it used to contain data, that data has been truncated — cut off and thrown away — and now the file size is 0 bytes, so you can't read any of the data that existed before you opened the file with w+. If you actually wanted to read the previous data and add to it, you should use r+ instead of w+. – rmunn Jan 6 '18 at 8:33
  • how to add new data on top ? – Beqa Bukhradze Jul 1 '18 at 17:34
  • 1
    @BeqaBukhradze - If you have a question, click the "Ask a question" button, where it will be seen by hundreds of people. Don't just click the "Add Comment" button where only one or two people will see it. – rmunn Jul 2 '18 at 1:05
305

Here is a list of the different modes of opening a file:

  • r

    Opens a file for reading only. The file pointer is placed at the beginning of the file. This is the default mode.

  • rb

    Opens a file for reading only in binary format. The file pointer is placed at the beginning of the file. This is the default mode.

  • r+

    Opens a file for both reading and writing. The file pointer will be at the beginning of the file.

  • rb+

    Opens a file for both reading and writing in binary format. The file pointer will be at the beginning of the file.

  • w

    Opens a file for writing only. Overwrites the file if the file exists. If the file does not exist, creates a new file for writing.

  • wb

    Opens a file for writing only in binary format. Overwrites the file if the file exists. If the file does not exist, creates a new file for writing.

  • w+

    Opens a file for both writing and reading. Overwrites the existing file if the file exists. If the file does not exist, creates a new file for reading and writing.

  • wb+

    Opens a file for both writing and reading in binary format. Overwrites the existing file if the file exists. If the file does not exist, creates a new file for reading and writing.

  • a

    Opens a file for appending. The file pointer is at the end of the file if the file exists. That is, the file is in the append mode. If the file does not exist, it creates a new file for writing.

  • ab

    Opens a file for appending in binary format. The file pointer is at the end of the file if the file exists. That is, the file is in the append mode. If the file does not exist, it creates a new file for writing.

  • a+

    Opens a file for both appending and reading. The file pointer is at the end of the file if the file exists. The file opens in the append mode. If the file does not exist, it creates a new file for reading and writing.

  • ab+

    Opens a file for both appending and reading in binary format. The file pointer is at the end of the file if the file exists. The file opens in the append mode. If the file does not exist, it creates a new file for reading and writing.

  • so for all intensive purposes, r+ and w+ are the same? – Nick Humrich Jul 17 '14 at 22:59
  • 11
    @Humdinger: No, w+ creates a new file or truncates an existing file, then opens it for reading and writing; r+ opens an existing file without truncating it for reading and writing. Very different. – abarnert Aug 4 '14 at 9:31
  • Also, as with @AlokAgarwal's answer, this claims to be an exhaustive list of modes, but isn't. – abarnert Aug 4 '14 at 9:32
  • 1
    It would be rather silly to give an exhaustive list of modes, as they function more like a function with multiple parameters. r, w, or a are exclusive, but b can be added to any of those, as can +, or U... It's a combinatorial explosion. – rmunn Oct 3 '14 at 6:41
  • 2
    rb is not the default mode, quote : The most commonly-used values of mode are 'r' for reading, 'w' for writing (truncating the file if it already exists), and 'a' for appending (which on some Unix systems means that all writes append to the end of the file regardless of the current seek position). If mode is omitted, it defaults to 'r' docs.python.org/2/library/functions.html#open – iggy Jul 27 '15 at 11:33
122

All file modes in Python

  • r for reading
  • r+ opens for reading and writing (cannot truncate a file)
  • w for writing
  • w+ for writing and reading (can truncate a file)
  • rb for reading a binary file. The file pointer is placed at the beginning of the file.
  • rb+ reading or writing a binary file
  • wb+ writing a binary file
  • a+ opens for appending
  • ab+ Opens a file for both appending and reading in binary. The file pointer is at the end of the file if the file exists. The file opens in the append mode.
  • x open for exclusive creation, failing if the file already exists (Python 3)
  • 5
    This isn't all the modes. It neglects, e.g., rb and wb, not to mention the U modes in 2.x and the t mode in 3.x (which can both be combined with everything except b). – abarnert Aug 4 '14 at 9:30
  • The difference between r+ and w+ is that w+ truncates a file when it's opened. But you can truncate it manually in both modes. – Martin Oct 7 '14 at 8:14
  • This answer is inconstant with the one given by @200 OK, for example does wb+ also read from the file? – Celeritas Jul 17 '15 at 19:53
  • @Celeritas The wb indicates that the file is opened for writing in binary mode. On Unix systems (Linux, Mac OS X, etc.), binary mode does nothing - they treat text files the same way that any other files are treated. On Windows, however, text files are written with slightly modified line endings. This causes a serious problem when dealing with actual binary files, like exe or jpg files. Therefore, when opening files which are not supposed to be text, even in Unix, you should use wb or rb. Use plain w or r only for text files. – Alok Agarwal Aug 12 '15 at 9:06
  • In Python 3, there is also the 'x' open mode: open for exclusive creation, failing if the file already exists. See open function in the doc. – Laurent LAPORTE Oct 20 '16 at 11:49
2

The file is truncated, so you can call read() (no exceptions raised, unlike when opened using 'w') but you'll get an empty string.

1

I suspect there are two ways to handle what I think you'r trying to achieve.

1) which is obvious, is open the file for reading only, read it into memory then open the file with t, then write your changes.

2) use the low level file handling routines:

# Open file in RW , create if it doesn't exist. *Don't* pass O_TRUNC
 fd = os.open(filename, os.O_RDWR | os.O_CREAT)

Hope this helps..

0

Actually, there's something wrong about all the other answers about r+ mode.

test.in file's content:

hello1
ok2
byebye3

And the py script's :

with open("test.in", 'r+')as f:
    f.readline()
    f.write("addition")

Execute it and the test.in's content will be changed to :

hello1
ok2
byebye3
addition

However, when we modify the script to :

with open("test.in", 'r+')as f:
    f.write("addition")

the test.in also do the respond:

additionk2
byebye3

So, the r+ mode will allow us to cover the content from the beginning if we did't do the read operation. And if we do some read operation, f.write()will just append to the file.

By the way, if we f.seek(0,0) before f.write(write_content), the write_content will cover them from the positon(0,0).

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