16

How can I use shell one-liners and common GNU tools to concatenate lines in two files as in Cartesian product? What is the most succinct, beautiful and "linuxy" way?

For example, if I have two files:

$ cat file1
a
b
$ cat file2
c
d
e

The result should be

a, c
a, d
a, e
b, c
b, d
b, e
2
  • Oh no, it's turned into a competition ...
    – C. Ross
    Oct 26 '09 at 20:31
  • 1
    @C. Ross , it didn't. I had a definite and expressed criterion of not using perl, python, etc. And the rest was only a usual battle for maintainability. simplicity and clarity.
    – P Shved
    Oct 26 '09 at 21:10

14 Answers 14

14

Here's shell script to do it

while read a; do while read b; do echo "$a, $b"; done < file2; done < file1

Though that will be quite slow. I can't think of any precompiled logic to accomplish this. The next step for speed would be to do the above in awk/perl.

awk 'NR==FNR { a[$0]; next } { for (i in a) print i",", $0 }' file1 file2

Hmm, how about this hacky solution to use precompiled logic?

paste -d, <(sed -n "$(yes 'p;' | head -n $(wc -l < file2))" file1) \
          <(cat $(yes 'file2' | head -n $(wc -l < file1)))
3
  • 2
    @Pixelbeat: your first version needs to reverse the order of file1 and file2. (That is, it should be done < file2; done < file 1 to get the desired result.
    – Telemachus
    Oct 25 '09 at 14:27
  • 3
    @Telemachus , the order is irrelevant: if I say "Cartesian product", I really mean it.
    – P Shved
    Oct 26 '09 at 20:11
  • @HiteshPatel, I believe this may be useful to you. The only change you'll need to make the while read a-type answer work correctly is to add the -r argument, making it while read -r a; do while read -r b; do, since your content has literal backslashes. (@pixelbeat, you may want to edit said arguments into the answer proper). Feb 7 '18 at 5:19
9

There won't be a comma to separate but using only join:

$ join -j 2 file1 file2
 a c
 a d
 a e
 b c
 b d
 b e
2
  • 1
    join -j 2 -o '1.1 2.1' -t ', ' file1 file2
    – Marcus
    May 31 '17 at 1:30
  • @Marcus, it might be worth pointing out that if you downgrade this to a single separator, i.e. -t ,, it will also work with a number of non-GNU join implementations. The OP's proviso aside, the wider community appreciates portability in answers. We don't all run Linux. :)
    – ghoti
    Feb 24 '18 at 21:50
7

The mechanical way to do it in shell, not using Perl or Python, is:

while read line1
do
    while read line2
    do echo "$line1, $line2"
    done < file2
done < file1

The join command can sometimes be used for these operations - however, I'm not clear that it can do cartesian product as a degenerate case.

One step up from the double loop would be:

while read line1
do
    sed "s/^/$line1, /" file2
done < file1
2
  • I'd go for the first solution because it doesn't make the files look like they're substantially different.
    – P Shved
    Oct 26 '09 at 20:20
  • It (the first solution) would likely be substantially slower - but it would also be immune to odd characters (such as slashes) in the data. Fixing things so that is not a problem is a bit fiddlier, and at that point you start thinking about using Perl or Python after all. Oct 26 '09 at 20:58
7

I'm not going to pretend this is pretty, but...

join -t, -j 9999 -o 2.1,1.1 /tmp/file1 /tmp/file2

(updated thanks to Iwan Aucamp below)

-- join (GNU coreutils) 8.4

1
  • you can eliminate use of cut by adding -o '2.1,1.1' (or whichever way round you like it) Mar 13 '15 at 21:58
5

Edit:

DVK's attempt inspired me to do this with eval:

script='1{x;d};${H;x;s/\n/\,/g;p;q};H'
eval "echo {$(sed -n $script file1)}\,\ {$(sed -n $script file2)}$'\n'"|sed 's/^ //'

Or a simpler sed script:

script=':a;N;${s/\n/,/g;b};ba'

which you would use without the -n switch.

which gives:

a, c
a, d
a, e
b, c
b, d
b, e

Original answer:

In Bash, you can do this. It doesn't read from files, but it's a neat trick:

$ echo {a,b}\,\ {c,d,e}$'\n'
a, c
 a, d
 a, e
 b, c
 b, d
 b, e

More simply:

$ echo {a,b}{c,d,e}
ac ad ae bc bd be
2
  • nice. but i sure would not want to maintain this script. :)
    – ghostdog74
    Oct 25 '09 at 23:49
  • Truly delightful, but unmaintainable. :)
    – P Shved
    Oct 26 '09 at 20:18
3

a generic recursive BASH function could be something like this:

foreachline() {

    _foreachline() {

        if [ $#  -lt 2 ]; then
            printf "$1\n"
            return
        fi

        local prefix=$1
        local file=$2
        shift 2

        while read line; do
            _foreachline "$prefix$line, " $*
        done <$file
    }

    _foreachline "" $*
}

foreachline file1 file2 file3

Regards.

2
  • 2
    This solution is unique among these solutions in that it solves the more general case of an arbitrary set of cartesian product operations. Jun 4 '15 at 13:39
  • 1
    The use of $* rather than "$@" is unfortunate, however; it means that any "*" as an argument will be replaced with a list of filenames, for example. Feb 7 '18 at 5:20
2

Solution 1:

perl -e '{use File::Slurp; @f1 = read_file("file1"); @f2 = read_file("file2"); map { chomp; $v1 = $_; map { print "$v1,$_"; } @f2 } @f1;}'

6
  • Why did you use map here? Those should be for loops.
    – user181548
    Oct 25 '09 at 14:05
  • @Kinopiko: Weren't you just complaining about "language police" on a different thread?
    – Telemachus
    Oct 25 '09 at 14:24
  • The only thing I like to use more than maps is Regular Expressions. :)
    – DVK
    Oct 25 '09 at 16:09
  • @Telemachus: If you can't beat them, join them.
    – user181548
    Oct 26 '09 at 4:01
  • Language Police is right here: Language Cops are coming and busting you! :-)
    – P Shved
    Oct 26 '09 at 20:16
2

Edit: Oops... Sorry, I thought this was tagged python...

If you have python 2.6:

from itertools import product
print('\n'.join((', '.join(elt) for elt in (product(*((line.strip() for line in fh) for fh in (open('file1','r'), open('file2','r'))))))))

a, c
a, d
a, e
b, c
b, d
b, e

If you have python pre-2.6:

def product(*args, **kwds):
    '''
    Source: http://docs.python.org/library/itertools.html#itertools.product
    '''
    # product('ABCD', 'xy') --> Ax Ay Bx By Cx Cy Dx Dy
    # product(range(2), repeat=3) --> 000 001 010 011 100 101 110 111
    pools = map(tuple, args) * kwds.get('repeat', 1)
    result = [[]]
    for pool in pools:
        result = [x+[y] for x in result for y in pool]
    for prod in result:
        yield tuple(prod)
print('\n'.join((', '.join(elt) for elt in (product(*((line.strip() for line in fh) for fh in (open('file1','r'), open('file2','r'))))))))
1
  • That would work, but python is not what I've been asking for.
    – P Shved
    Oct 25 '09 at 13:52
2

A solution using join, awk and process substitution:

join <(xargs -I_ echo 1 _ < setA) <(xargs -I_ echo 1 _ < setB)
  | awk '{ printf("%s, %s\n", $2, $3) }'
3
  • What is the contents of the file "a"? Should one of them be a different file? The AWK could probably be replaced by cut -f2- -d' '. Jul 31 '10 at 19:20
  • The "a" file contains the set. They may be different if wanted. I'll correct it!
    – yassin
    Jul 31 '10 at 19:36
  • @Dennis, cut is probably better, since it works even if setB contains lines with whitespaces.
    – P Shved
    Aug 1 '10 at 6:12
1
awk 'FNR==NR{ a[++d]=$1; next}
{
  for ( i=1;i<=d;i++){
    print $1","a[i]
  }
}' file2 file1

# ./shell.sh
a,c
a,d
a,e
b,c
b,d
b,e
1

OK, this is derivation of Dennis Williamson's solution above since he noted that his does not read from file:

$ echo {`cat a | tr "\012" ","`}\,\ {`cat b | tr "\012" ","`}$'\n'
a, c
 a, d
 a, e
 b, c
 b, d
 b, e
1
  • 1
    This is what that gives me: {a,b,}, {c,d,e,} as a literal string. Oct 25 '09 at 20:17
1

GNU Parallel:

parallel echo "{1}, {2}" :::: file1 :::: file2

Output:

a, c
a, d
a, e
b, c
b, d
b, e
0

Of course perl has a module for that:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use File::Slurp;
use Math::Cartesian::Product;

use v5.10;
$, = ", ";

@file1 = read_file("file1", chomp => 1);
@file2 = read_file("file2", chomp => 1);

cartesian { say @_ } \@file1, \@file2;

Output:

a, c
a, d
a, e
b, c
b, d
b, e
0

In it's a one-liner

printf '%s\n' (cat file1)", "(cat file2)

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