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I am trying to see a log file using tail -f and want to exclude all lines containing the following strings:

"Nopaging the limit is"`  and `"keyword to remove is"

I am able to exclude one string like this:

tail -f admin.log|grep -v "Nopaging the limit is"

But how do I exclude lines containing either of string1 or string2.

104
0

Two examples of filtering out multiple lines with grep:

Put this in filename.txt:

abc
def
ghi
jkl

grep command using -E option with a pipe between tokens in a string:

grep -Ev 'def|jkl' filename.txt

prints:

abc
ghi

Command using -v option with pipe between tokens surrounded by parens:

egrep -v '(def|jkl)' filename.txt

prints:

abc
ghi
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  • 14
    I'm surprised nobody talked about the grep -v -e def -e jkl method which IMHO is clearer… – Frizlab Sep 24 '16 at 15:15
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    Or even better: grep -Fv -e def -e jkl which is even faster! – Frizlab Sep 24 '16 at 15:18
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    With the -F flag, you can use newlines as delimiters instead of pipes. This allows the use of command output as the filter more easily, e.g.: grep -vF $(pgrep myprocess) – Phlarx Feb 22 '17 at 19:44
42
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grep -Fv -e 'Nopaging the limit is' -e 'keyword to remove is'

-F matches by literal strings (instead of regex)

-v inverts the match

-e allows for multiple search patterns (all literal and inverted)

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  • This is the right answer: The only one that avoids both the multiple grep -v instances and the artificial requirement of a regex (lets the multiple strings be specified cleanly in separate arguments). Just imagine constructing that regex programmatically in a script for strings that could contain anything… – user2394284 Aug 9 '17 at 7:47
  • Actually none of these are right answers because when passing no keywords to exclude it will exclude everything instead of nothing. – Győri Sándor Feb 29 at 23:20
37
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Another option is to create a exclude list, this is particulary usefull when you have a long list of things to exclude.

vi /root/scripts/exclude_list.txt

Now add what you would like to exclude

Nopaging the limit is
keyword to remove is

Now use grep to remove lines from your file log file and view information not excluded.

grep -v -f /root/scripts/exclude_list.txt /var/log/admin.log
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  • 1
    I didn't realize you could use -v with -f (or that the latter even existed). – Sridhar Sarnobat Jul 25 '16 at 19:22
  • very very useful! – samaspin Mar 11 '18 at 12:10
  • Note, that you don't have to create temporary file for the exclusion list. In bash you can use process substitution. This is handy if the exclusion list is kinda dynamic and you'd have to generate it before each use only to be used once: grep -v -f <(gen_exclusions.sh) /var/log/admin.log – Miroslav Aug 29 '18 at 11:06
22
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egrep -v "Nopaging the limit is|keyword to remove is"
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13
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tail -f admin.log|grep -v -E '(Nopaging the limit is|keyword to remove is)'
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11
0

You can use regular grep like this:

tail -f admin.log | grep -v "Nopaging the limit is\|keyword to remove is"

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  • 1
    This answer worked for me on MacOSX. Escaping the pipe is key – Rebecca Dessonville May 21 '16 at 15:24
5
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The greps can be chained. For example:

tail -f admin.log | grep -v "Nopaging the limit is" | grep -v "keyword to remove is"
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  • 1
    The catch here is that instead of process which would be filtering out, you'd have to run N processes sequentially, where each one of them filters something out. It could slow down things significantly. – Artem Oboturov Jul 31 '17 at 15:20

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