I have a setter in my class:

-(void)setNumbers:(NSArray *)aNumbers{
  NSArray *tArray = [[NSArray alloc]initWithArray:aNumbers]; //throws BAD ACCESS
  self.numbers = tArray;
  //also tried self.numbers = [tArray copy];
  [tArray release];

}

If I invoke the setter like this:

NSArray *numbers = [TicketManager getRandomNumbersFor:@"LottoNormal"];
[self.ticket setNumbers:numbers];

In the 'getRandomNumbersFor:' method (the loop gets executed):

+(NSArray *)getRandomNumbersFor:(NSString *)aTicketType{

  NSLog(@"getting RandomNumbers for: %@",aTicketType);
  NSMutableArray *tResult;
  if([aTicketType isEqualToString:@"LottoNormal"]){
    tResult = [NSMutableArray arrayWithCapacity:6];
    for(int i = 0;i<6;i++){
        int tNumber = arc4random() % 48;
        tNumber++;
        NSLog(@"Number: %i",tNumber);
        [tResult addObject:[NSNumber numberWithInt:tNumber]];
    }
  }

  return tResult;
}

In a ViewController I´m getting a bad access in the marked line.
Can anyone can help?

  • You'll need to tell us what aNumbers is. Seems to me that aNumbers is probably nil here. – Graham Perks Apr 25 '13 at 13:13
  • thanks for the hint, I updated my question, sadly it´s a bit bloated now. – 最白目 Apr 25 '13 at 13:16
  • So yes... tResult can be returned nil if you don't have ticket type as "LottoNormal". In your setter, check for an incoming nil. – Graham Perks Apr 25 '13 at 13:18
  • 4
    By the way, why have you written the setNumbers setter method? Given that you defined a property, numbers, a setter method called setNumbers will be synthesized for you. Worse, your setNumbers calls itself! The construct self.numbers = tArray ends up calling [self setNumbers:tArray]. Looks like infinite recursion to me. Do not write your own setNumbers. Let the compiler do this for you. – Rob Apr 25 '13 at 13:21
  • 1
    thank you so much, I see now. – 最白目 Apr 25 '13 at 13:23
up vote 2 down vote accepted

By the way, why have you written the setNumbers setter method? Given that you defined a property, numbers, a setter method called setNumbers will be synthesized for you. Worse, your setNumbers calls itself! The construct

self.numbers = tArray;

is equivalent to calling

[self setNumbers:tArray];

That results in infinite recursion.

As an aside, I'd advise against writing your own setNumbers setter method unless there is a compelling reason to do so. The default setter does all sorts of wonderful stuff (appropriate memory management, KVO, etc.), so you should think long and hard about replacing it with your own. Just let the compiler synthesize your accessor methods (setters and getters) for you, if you can.

If you have to write your own accessor methods for some reason, at the very least, make sure to reference instance variables, not accessor methods.

How is self.numbers defined? You may not need to make your own setter here.

Rather than

@property (nonatomic, retain) NSArray *numbers;

you could declare is as copied:

@property (nonatomic, copy) NSArray *numbers;

And let the dynamic setter do the copy work for you. This'll also handle an incoming nil.

  • of course, if I create properties for the class members, I dont need setters! Thank you! – 最白目 Apr 25 '13 at 13:20

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