221

How can I get a list of the values in a dict in Python?

In Java, getting the values of a Map as a List is as easy as doing list = map.values();. I'm wondering if there is a similarly simple way in Python to get a list of values from a dict.

332

Yes it's the exact same thing in Python 2:

d.values()

In Python 3 (where dict.values returns a view of the dictionary’s values instead):

list(d.values())
  • 3
    @Muhd The Python docs always have everything: docs.python.org/2/library/stdtypes.html – jamylak Apr 26 '13 at 3:29
  • 12
    or, alternatively [d[k] for k in d] which works for both python2.x and 3.x (Please be advised, I'm not actually suggesting that you use this). Usually you don't actually need a list of values so d.values() is just fine. – mgilson Apr 26 '13 at 3:45
  • 2
    A slightly "better" link (to a specific spot on the page you posted): docs.python.org/2/library/stdtypes.html#dict.values – mgilson Apr 26 '13 at 3:46
  • 1
    Or d.itervalues() for returning an iterator of dictionary values and avoiding a list. – 101 Jan 13 '15 at 5:15
  • @figs The question is "list of values" but yes, if you were iterating a dictionary on Python 2 definitely use d.itervalues() and in most cases you will only need to iterate and wont need a list. – jamylak Jan 13 '15 at 7:13
6

You can use * operator to unpack dict_values:

>>> d = {1: "a", 2: "b"}
>>> [*d.values()]
['a', 'b']

or list object

>>> d = {1: "a", 2: "b"}
>>> list(d.values())
['a', 'b']
  • Nice solution, I knew you could do this with keys but not with values, good to know :D – Timbus Calin Apr 5 at 7:12
3

Follow the below example --

songs = [
{"title": "happy birthday", "playcount": 4},
{"title": "AC/DC", "playcount": 2},
{"title": "Billie Jean", "playcount": 6},
{"title": "Human Touch", "playcount": 3}
]

print("====================")
print(f'Songs --> {songs} \n')
title = list(map(lambda x : x['title'], songs))
print(f'Print Title --> {title}')

playcount = list(map(lambda x : x['playcount'], songs))
print(f'Print Playcount --> {playcount}')
print (f'Print Sorted playcount --> {sorted(playcount)}')

# Aliter -
print(sorted(list(map(lambda x: x['playcount'],songs))))
3

Considering Python3, what is quicker?

small_ds = {x: str(x+42) for x in range(10)}
small_di = {x: int(x+42) for x in range(10)}

print('Small Dict(str)')
%timeit [*small_ds.values()]
%timeit list(small_ds.values())

print('Small Dict(int)')
%timeit [*small_di.values()]
%timeit list(small_di.values())

big_ds = {x: str(x+42) for x in range(1000000)}
big_di = {x: int(x+42) for x in range(1000000)}

print('Big Dict(str)')
%timeit [*big_ds.values()]
%timeit list(big_ds.values())

print('Big Dict(int)')
%timeit [*big_di.values()]
%timeit list(big_di.values())
Small Dict(str)
284 ns ± 50.3 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)
401 ns ± 53 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)

Small Dict(int)
308 ns ± 79.7 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)
428 ns ± 62.3 ns per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1000000 loops each)

Big Dict(str)
29.5 ms ± 13.8 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)
19.8 ms ± 1.3 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

Big Dict(int)
22.3 ms ± 1.4 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)
21.2 ms ± 1.49 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

The result

  1. For big dictionaries where it matters list() is quicker
  2. For small dictionaries * operator is quicker
-1
out: dict_values([{1:a, 2:b}])

in:  str(dict.values())[14:-3]    
out: 1:a, 2:b

Purely for visual purposes. Does not produce a useful product... Only useful if you want a long dictionary to print in a paragraph type form.

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