10

I have the following javascript code that convert date (string) to the Date Serial Number used in Microsoft Excel:

function JSDateToExcelDate(inDate) {

    var returnDateTime = 25569.0 + ((inDate.getTime() - (inDate.getTimezoneOffset() * 60 * 1000)) / (1000 * 60 * 60 * 24));
    return returnDateTime.toString().substr(0,5);

}

So, how do I do the reverse? (Meaning that a Javascript code that convert the Date Serial Number used in Microsoft Excel to a date string?

29

Try this:

function ExcelDateToJSDate(serial) {
   var utc_days  = Math.floor(serial - 25569);
   var utc_value = utc_days * 86400;                                        
   var date_info = new Date(utc_value * 1000);

   var fractional_day = serial - Math.floor(serial) + 0.0000001;

   var total_seconds = Math.floor(86400 * fractional_day);

   var seconds = total_seconds % 60;

   total_seconds -= seconds;

   var hours = Math.floor(total_seconds / (60 * 60));
   var minutes = Math.floor(total_seconds / 60) % 60;

   return new Date(date_info.getFullYear(), date_info.getMonth(), date_info.getDate(), hours, minutes, seconds);
}

Custom made for you :)

  • 2
    Why you are subtracting 25569 even though 1970 - 1900 = 25567 days? Not to say this is first code online I found that actually works precisely because of that. – Marcin Ignac May 2 '14 at 11:09
  • 1
    Tested several solutions and this is first/only one which gives me expected values – biesior Sep 17 '15 at 11:03
  • 1
    @silkfire, hehe next one curious ;) Situation is simple, my colleague - remote service man, has an access to damaged log files, where excel dates wasn't converted to readable format, I just wrote fast JS so he can check the value online without installing Excel or any other programm on the target machine, just can open the site and write the value. fini. – biesior Sep 17 '15 at 11:36
  • 1
    @biesior Sounds neat! Nice job, glad the snippet I composed was helpful to you. – silkfire Sep 17 '15 at 11:53
  • 2
    can you test your solution by changing the timezone..i am in PST time zone i had to minus 25568, then it worked but in UTC+10:00 it doesnt work, please check in utc+ and utc- timezone. – shyam_ Jul 23 '16 at 21:20
13

I made a one-liner for you:

function ExcelDateToJSDate(date) {
  return new Date(Math.round((date - 25569)*86400*1000));
}
  • why Math.round? – pappadog Jun 1 '14 at 14:16
  • @pappadog I found that the date could be off by 1ms otherwise, and was more accurate than the 0.0000001 offset provided in silkfire's answer. – Gil Jun 2 '14 at 11:19
  • 1
    It didn't work for me with the Math.round. It worked removing it though. – Jair Reina Dec 30 '14 at 17:38
  • 1
    The time is not accurate with this one-liner function. But the date is correct. – Darwin Gautalius Feb 24 '16 at 4:25
0

Although I stumbled onto this discussion years after it began, I may have a simpler solution to the original question -- fwiw, here is the way I ended up doing the conversion from Excel "days since 1899-12-30" to the JS Date I needed:

var exdate = 33970; // represents Jan 1, 1993
var e0date = new Date(0); // epoch "zero" date
var offset = e0date.getTimezoneOffset(); // tz offset in min

// calculate Excel xxx days later, with local tz offset
var jsdate = new Date(0, 0, exdate-1, 0, -offset, 0);

jsdate.toJSON() => '1993-01-01T00:00:00.000Z'

Essentially, it just builds a new Date object that is calculated by adding the # of Excel days (1-based), and then adjusting the minutes by the negative local timezone offset.

-1
// Parses an Excel Date ("serial") into a
// corresponding javascript Date in UTC+0 timezone.
//
// Doesn't account for leap seconds.
// Therefore is not 100% correct.
// But will do, I guess, since we're
// not doing rocket science here.
//
// https://www.pcworld.com/article/3063622/software/mastering-excel-date-time-serial-numbers-networkdays-datevalue-and-more.html
// "If you need to calculate dates in your spreadsheets,
//  Excel uses its own unique system, which it calls Serial Numbers".
//
lib.parseExcelDate = function (excelSerialDate) {
  // "Excel serial date" is just
  // the count of days since `01/01/1900`
  // (seems that it may be even fractional).
  //
  // The count of days elapsed
  // since `01/01/1900` (Excel epoch)
  // till `01/01/1970` (Unix epoch).
  // Accounts for leap years
  // (19 of them, yielding 19 extra days).
  const daysBeforeUnixEpoch = 70 * 365 + 19;

  // An hour, approximately, because a minute
  // may be longer than 60 seconds, see "leap seconds".
  const hour = 60 * 60 * 1000;

  // "In the 1900 system, the serial number 1 represents January 1, 1900, 12:00:00 a.m.
  //  while the number 0 represents the fictitious date January 0, 1900".
  // These extra 12 hours are a hack to make things
  // a little bit less weird when rendering parsed dates.
  // E.g. if a date `Jan 1st, 2017` gets parsed as
  // `Jan 1st, 2017, 00:00 UTC` then when displayed in the US
  // it would show up as `Dec 31st, 2016, 19:00 UTC-05` (Austin, Texas).
  // That would be weird for a website user.
  // Therefore this extra 12-hour padding is added
  // to compensate for the most weird cases like this
  // (doesn't solve all of them, but most of them).
  // And if you ask what about -12/+12 border then
  // the answer is people there are already accustomed
  // to the weird time behaviour when their neighbours
  // may have completely different date than they do.
  //
  // `Math.round()` rounds all time fractions
  // smaller than a millisecond (e.g. nanoseconds)
  // but it's unlikely that an Excel serial date
  // is gonna contain even seconds.
  //
  return new Date(Math.round((excelSerialDate - daysBeforeUnixEpoch) * 24 * hour) + 12 * hour);
};

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