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i created a PEM certificate from a PFX certificate and wanted to verify it. However i ran into this issue, try to find some answers, but i didnt and therefore i dont know how to fix it. could you please advice? thank you very much.

C:\OpenSSL-Win32\bin>set OPENSSL_CONF=C:\OpenSSL-Win32\bin\openssl.cfg

C:\OpenSSL-Win32\bin>openssl
OpenSSL> verify C:\mycert.pem
C:\mycert.pem: C = CZ, ST = Sprava zakladnich registru, L = "Obec=Praha,Ulice=Na Vapence,PSC=13000", O = 72054506, OU = 4333, CN = tstcawilly.szr.local
error 20 at 0 depth lookup:unable to get local issuer certificate
error in verify
OpenSSL>
OpenSSL> verify -CAfile C:\mycert.pem C:\mycert.pem
C:\mycert.pem: C = CZ, ST = Sprava zakladnich registru, L = "Obec=Praha,Ulice=Na Vapence,PSC=13000", O = 72054506, OU = 4333, CN = tstcawilly.szr.local
error 20 at 0 depth lookup:unable to get local issuer certificate
error in verify
OpenSSL>
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  • Same problem here with a fresh certificate issued to us and installed on a tomcat server. – Brian Knoblauch Apr 14 '14 at 18:26
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OpenSSL> verify -CAfile C:\mycert.pem C:\mycert.pem

Close. You need to add the CA's root certificate with -CAfile; and not your end entity certificate. Something like:

openssl verify -CAfile C:\ca-cert.pem C:\mycert.pem

Also, if there is an intermediate certificate, then it needs to be added to mycert.pem. So mycert.pem will actually have two (or more) certificates (rather than one).

Adding all required certificates to mycert.pem in an effort to build a valid chain solves the "which directory" problem. Its a well known problem in PKI. Essentially, a client (like me) does not know where to go to get missing intermediate certificates.

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  • In the case of a self-signed certificate, isn't the self-signed cert both the CA cert and the entity cert? – Wilbur Whateley Aug 24 '17 at 20:12
  • @WilburWhateley - No. Basic Constraints and CA:FALSE must be set. CA:TRUE cannot be set. If the CA attribute were true, the end entity certificates could mint other certificates. – jww Aug 24 '17 at 20:14
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    So impossible with self-signed? Not clear. Because there is only one cert in this case, right? So a self-signed cannot be a CA, and without a CA, you can't verify... Is there something I'm missing, or is this generally a bad design for SSL. – Wilbur Whateley Aug 24 '17 at 22:07
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    @WilburWhateley I'm rather new to using openssl but from what I've gathered openssl trusts no CA by default, you have to specify to it what CA(s) to trust. Additionally, you can create a CA yourself with openssl (CA:TRUE). Therefore to get a self-signed certificate to verify you need to first create your CA's certificate & key, then create your "self-signed" certificate by signing it with that newly created CA. At that point you can now verify your self-signed certificate, using your own CA. At least that's what I've gathered the past 48 hours or so, and have it working locally. – Darren Felton Mar 7 '18 at 14:50
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Another case is pathlen can only be set when CA:TRUE in basicConstraints.

Example:

basicConstraints=CA:TRUE,pathlen:10 # Okay
basicConstraints=CA:FALSE,pathlen:10 # Invalid!
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  • Thanks for this. I had been beating my head against a wall for about an hour because I had set CA:FALSE, pathlen:0 on my leaf certificates ... the cert created OK, but openssl verify failed to validate it. Making the simple change to just be CA:FALSE resulted in validate-able certificates – Doug Baer Jan 22 at 16:34

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