How to do this in pandas:

I have a function extract_text_features on a single text column, returning multiple output columns. Specifically, the function returns 6 values.

The function works, however there doesn't seem to be any proper return type (pandas DataFrame/ numpy array/ Python list) such that the output can get correctly assigned df.ix[: ,10:16] = df.textcol.map(extract_text_features)

So I think I need to drop back to iterating with df.iterrows(), as per this?

UPDATE: Iterating with df.iterrows() is at least 20x slower, so I surrendered and split out the function into six distinct .map(lambda ...) calls.

  • 1
    can you give a code example with some data? – Jeff Apr 26 '13 at 13:06
  • It's not necessary, just create any large random junk data frame (200,000 rows) and any function returning six results. (My code for the text-features is proprietary) – smci Apr 26 '13 at 14:55
  • 4
    pls put up that example (with random data is fine), even an approximate function is fine, but your specific translation of words to code may matter – Jeff Apr 26 '13 at 16:19
  • 1
    I don't think you can do multiple assignment the way you have it written: df.ix[: ,10:16]. I think you'll have to merge your features into the dataset. – Zelazny7 Apr 26 '13 at 20:52
  • 1
    For those wanting a much more performant solution check this one below which does not use apply – Ted Petrou Nov 3 '17 at 14:08

10 Answers 10

up vote 71 down vote accepted

Building off of user1827356 's answer, you can do the assignment in one pass using df.merge:

df.merge(df.textcol.apply(lambda s: pd.Series({'feature1':s+1, 'feature2':s-1})), 
    left_index=True, right_index=True)

    textcol  feature1  feature2
0  0.772692  1.772692 -0.227308
1  0.857210  1.857210 -0.142790
2  0.065639  1.065639 -0.934361
3  0.819160  1.819160 -0.180840
4  0.088212  1.088212 -0.911788
  • 2
    just out of curiousity, is it expected to use up a lot of memory by doing this? I am doing this on a dataframe that holds 2.5mil rows, and i nearly ran into memory problems (also it is much slower than returning just 1 column). – Jeffrey04 Nov 4 '15 at 7:54
  • 1
    The method is good, but the memory cost is too much. – JoshuaW1990 Feb 2 at 4:11
  • 2
    'df.join(df.textcol.apply(lambda s: pd.Series({'feature1':s+1, 'feature2':s-1})))' would be a better option I think. – Shivam K Thakkar Mar 3 at 20:28
  • @ShivamKThakkar why do you think your suggestion would be a better option? Would it be more efficient you think or have less memory cost? – tsando May 8 at 10:34

I usually do this using zip:

>>> df = pd.DataFrame([[i] for i in range(10)], columns=['num'])
>>> df
    num
0    0
1    1
2    2
3    3
4    4
5    5
6    6
7    7
8    8
9    9

>>> def powers(x):
>>>     return x, x**2, x**3, x**4, x**5, x**6

>>> df['p1'], df['p2'], df['p3'], df['p4'], df['p5'], df['p6'] = \
>>>     zip(*df['num'].map(powers))

>>> df
        num     p1      p2      p3      p4      p5      p6
0       0       0       0       0       0       0       0
1       1       1       1       1       1       1       1
2       2       2       4       8       16      32      64
3       3       3       9       27      81      243     729
4       4       4       16      64      256     1024    4096
5       5       5       25      125     625     3125    15625
6       6       6       36      216     1296    7776    46656
7       7       7       49      343     2401    16807   117649
8       8       8       64      512     4096    32768   262144
9       9       9       81      729     6561    59049   531441
  • 4
    But what do you do if you have 50 columns added like this rather than 6? – max Nov 4 '15 at 23:21
  • 7
    @max temp = list(zip(*df['num'].map(powers))); for i, c in enumerate(columns): df[c] = temp[c] – ostrokach Nov 5 '15 at 0:35
  • 6
    @ostrokach I think you meant for i, c in enumerate(columns): df[c] = temp[i]. Thanks to this, I really got the purpose of enumerate :D – rocarvaj Feb 26 '16 at 4:25
  • 2
    This is by far the most elegant and readable solution I've come across for this. Unless you're getting performance problems, the idiom zip(*df['col'].map(function)) is probably the way to go. – François Leblanc Aug 1 '17 at 20:36
  • 1

This is what I've done in the past

df = pd.DataFrame({'textcol' : np.random.rand(5)})

df
    textcol
0  0.626524
1  0.119967
2  0.803650
3  0.100880
4  0.017859

df.textcol.apply(lambda s: pd.Series({'feature1':s+1, 'feature2':s-1}))
   feature1  feature2
0  1.626524 -0.373476
1  1.119967 -0.880033
2  1.803650 -0.196350
3  1.100880 -0.899120
4  1.017859 -0.982141

Editing for completeness

pd.concat([df, df.textcol.apply(lambda s: pd.Series({'feature1':s+1, 'feature2':s-1}))], axis=1)
    textcol feature1  feature2
0  0.626524 1.626524 -0.373476
1  0.119967 1.119967 -0.880033
2  0.803650 1.803650 -0.196350
3  0.100880 1.100880 -0.899120
4  0.017859 1.017859 -0.982141
  • concat() looks simpler than merge() for connecting the new cols to the original dataframe. – cumin Sep 29 '17 at 14:19

This is the correct and easiest way to accomplish this for 95% of use cases:

>>> df = pd.DataFrame(zip(*[range(10)]), columns=['num'])
>>> df
    num
0    0
1    1
2    2
3    3
4    4
5    5

>>> def example(x):
...     x['p1'] = x['num']**2
...     x['p2'] = x['num']**3
...     x['p3'] = x['num']**4
...     return x

>>> df = df.apply(example, axis=1)
>>> df
    num  p1  p2  p3
0    0   0   0    0
1    1   1   1    1
2    2   4   8   16
3    3   9  27   81
4    4  16  64  256
  • shouldn't you write: df = df.apply(example(df), axis=1) correct me if I am wrong, I am just a newbie – user299791 Jun 16 '17 at 19:06
  • @user299791, No in this case you are treating example as a first class object so you are passing in the function itself. This function will applied to each row. – Michael David Watson Jun 19 '17 at 17:38
  • I never thought of this. Thanks for the tip. – Maxime De Bruyn Apr 8 at 14:30
  • hi Michael, your answer helped me in my problem. Definitely your solution is better than the original pandas' df.assign() method, cuz this is one time per column. Using assign(), if you want to create 2 new columns, you have to use df1 to work on df to get new column1, then use df2 to work on df1 to create the second new column...this is quite monotonous. But your method saved my life!!! Thanks!!! – commentallez-vous Jul 31 at 5:49

Summary: If you only want to create a few columns, use df[['new_col1','new_col2']] = df[['data1','data2']].apply( function_of_your_choosing(x), axis=1)

For this solution, the number of new columns you are creating must be equal to the number columns you use as input to the .apply() function. If you want to do something else, have a look at the other answers.

Details Let's say you have two-column dataframe. The first column is a person's height when they are 10; the second is said person's height when they are 20.

Suppose you need to calculate both the mean of each person's heights and sum of each person's heights. That's two values per each row.

You could do this via the following, soon-to-be-applied function:

def mean_and_sum(x):
    """
    Calculates the mean and sum of two heights.
    Parameters:
    :x -- the values in the row this function is applied to. Could also work on a list or a tuple.
    """

    sum=x[0]+x[1]
    mean=sum/2
    return [mean,sum]

You might use this function like so:

 df[['height_at_age_10','height_at_age_20']].apply(mean_and_sum(x),axis=1)

(To be clear: this apply function takes in the values from each row in the subsetted dataframe and returns a list.)

However, if you do this:

df['Mean_&_Sum'] = df[['height_at_age_10','height_at_age_20']].apply(mean_and_sum(x),axis=1)

you'll create 1 new column that contains the [mean,sum] lists, which you'd presumably want to avoid, because that would require another Lambda/Apply.

Instead, you want to break out each value into its own column. To do this, you can create two columns at once:

df[['Mean','Sum']] = df[['height_at_age_10','height_at_age_20']]
.apply(mean_and_sum(x),axis=1)

I've looked several ways of doing this and the method shown here (returning a pandas series) doesn't seem to be most efficient.

If we start with a largeish dataframe of random data:

# Setup a dataframe of random numbers and create a 
df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.randn(10000,3),columns=list('ABC'))
df['D'] = df.apply(lambda r: ':'.join(map(str, (r.A, r.B, r.C))), axis=1)
columns = 'new_a', 'new_b', 'new_c'

The example shown here:

# Create the dataframe by returning a series
def method_b(v):
    return pd.Series({k: v for k, v in zip(columns, v.split(':'))})
%timeit -n10 -r3 df.D.apply(method_b)

10 loops, best of 3: 2.77 s per loop

An alternative method:

# Create a dataframe from a series of tuples
def method_a(v):
    return v.split(':')
%timeit -n10 -r3 pd.DataFrame(df.D.apply(method_a).tolist(), columns=columns)

10 loops, best of 3: 8.85 ms per loop

By my reckoning it's far more efficient to take a series of tuples and then convert that to a DataFrame. I'd be interested to hear people's thinking though if there's an error in my working.

The accepted solution is going to be extremely slow for lots of data. The solution with the greatest number of upvotes is a little difficult to read and also slow with numeric data. If each new column can be calculated independently of the others, I would just assign each of them directly without using apply.

Example with fake character data

Create 100,000 strings in a DataFrame

df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.choice(['he jumped', 'she ran', 'they hiked'],
                                   size=100000, replace=True),
                  columns=['words'])
df.head()
        words
0     she ran
1     she ran
2  they hiked
3  they hiked
4  they hiked

Let's say we wanted to extract some text features as done in the original question. For instance, let's extract the first character, count the occurrence of the letter 'e' and capitalize the phrase.

df['first'] = df['words'].str[0]
df['count_e'] = df['words'].str.count('e')
df['cap'] = df['words'].str.capitalize()
df.head()
        words first  count_e         cap
0     she ran     s        1     She ran
1     she ran     s        1     She ran
2  they hiked     t        2  They hiked
3  they hiked     t        2  They hiked
4  they hiked     t        2  They hiked

Timings

%%timeit
df['first'] = df['words'].str[0]
df['count_e'] = df['words'].str.count('e')
df['cap'] = df['words'].str.capitalize()
127 ms ± 585 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

def extract_text_features(x):
    return x[0], x.count('e'), x.capitalize()

%timeit df['first'], df['count_e'], df['cap'] = zip(*df['words'].apply(extract_text_features))
101 ms ± 2.96 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

Surprisingly, you can get better performance by looping through each value

%%timeit
a,b,c = [], [], []
for s in df['words']:
    a.append(s[0]), b.append(s.count('e')), c.append(s.capitalize())

df['first'] = a
df['count_e'] = b
df['cap'] = c
79.1 ms ± 294 µs per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

Another example with fake numeric data

Create 1 million random numbers and test the powers function from above.

df = pd.DataFrame(np.random.rand(1000000), columns=['num'])


def powers(x):
    return x, x**2, x**3, x**4, x**5, x**6

%%timeit
df['p1'], df['p2'], df['p3'], df['p4'], df['p5'], df['p6'] = \
       zip(*df['num'].map(powers))
1.35 s ± 83.6 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 1 loop each)

Assigning each column is 25x faster and very readable:

%%timeit 
df['p1'] = df['num'] ** 1
df['p2'] = df['num'] ** 2
df['p3'] = df['num'] ** 3
df['p4'] = df['num'] ** 4
df['p5'] = df['num'] ** 5
df['p6'] = df['num'] ** 6
51.6 ms ± 1.9 ms per loop (mean ± std. dev. of 7 runs, 10 loops each)

I made a similar response with more details here on why apply is typically not the way to go.

  • Thanks a lot, I'll get around to rechecking the timing then accept this. Also need to ensure we don't blow out memory. – smci Nov 3 '17 at 19:46

In 2018, I use apply() with argument result_type='expand'

>>> appiled_df = df.apply(lambda row: fn(row.text), axis='columns', result_type='expand')
>>> df = pd.concat([df, appiled_df], axis='columns')

you can return the entire row instead of values:

df = df.apply(extract_text_features,axis = 1)

where the function returns the row

def extract_text_features(row):
      row['new_col1'] = value1
      row['new_col2'] = value2
      return row
  • No I don't want to apply extract_text_features to every column of the df, only to the text column df.textcol – smci Jun 24 at 19:29

Have posted the same answer in two other similar questions. The way I prefer to do this is to wrap up the return values of the function in a series:

def f(x):
    return pd.Series([x**2, x**3])

And then use apply as follows to create separate columns:

df[['x**2','x**3']] = df.apply(lambda row: f(row['x']), axis=1)

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