0

I am trying to add a helper method to scrub out any non-alphanumeric characters in my class. However, I keep getting the error

NullReferenceException: Object reference not set to an instance of an object.   

Not sure what I'm doing wrong here since I thought this was the proper way to set up any kind of validation within a class. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

    private string agentId;
    public string AgentId
    {
        get { return agentId; }
        set { agentId = this.scrubAgentId(); } 
    }

    private string scrubAgentId()
    {
        char[] arr = this.AgentId.ToCharArray();

        arr = Array.FindAll<char>(arr, (c => (char.IsLetterOrDigit(c))));
        return new string(arr);
    }
  • 2
    AgentId is null in scrubAgentId's char[] arr = this.AgentId.ToCharArray(); – G. Stoynev Apr 26 '13 at 17:49
6

This isn't really right at all. You're discarding the value when performing your set. It should probably look something more like this:

    private string agentId;
    public string AgentId
    {
        get { return agentId; }
        set { agentId = this.scrubAgentId(value); } 
    }

    private string scrubAgentId(string value)
    {
        if(value == null)
            return value;
        char[] arr = value.ToCharArray();

        arr = Array.FindAll<char>(arr, (c => (char.IsLetterOrDigit(c))));
        return new string(arr);
    }
  • perfect, thank you! – NealR Apr 26 '13 at 17:54
0

In the set part of the property you have an implicit object, value which holds the value you want to set... Use this value as your base

private string agentId;
public string AgentId
{
    get { return agentId; }
    set { agentId = value; } // manipulate value here using your method
}
0

Are you initialising agentid anywhere first?

Its failing on char[] arr = this.AgentId.ToCharArray();

0

You never reference the value in your setter. You want to do something like this:

private string agentId;
public string AgentId
{
    get
    {
      return agentId ;
    }
    set
    {
      agentId = new string( value.ToCharArray().Where( c => c.IsLetterOrDigit(c) ) ) ;
    }
}
  • This will throw an exception if a caller attempts to set AgentId=null; – Jordan Kaye Apr 26 '13 at 18:02
  • Obviously. You might notice the 'something like this' qualification. How to handle the edge case there should be pretty obvious (and dependent on the desired semantics of the property). – Nicholas Carey Apr 26 '13 at 18:05

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