32

I have a web API I'm working on using the MVC 4 Web API framework. If there is an exception, I'm currently throwing a new HttpResponseException. ie:

if (!Int32.TryParse(id, out userId))
    throw new HttpResponseException(Request.CreateErrorResponse(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest, "Invalid id")); 

This returns an object to the client that is simply {"message":"Invalid id"}

I would like to gain further control over this response to exceptions by returning a more detailed object. Something like

{
 "status":-1,
 "substatus":3,
 "message":"Could not find user"
 }

How would I go about doing this? Is the best way to serialize my error object and set it in the response message?

I've also looked into the ModelStateDictionary a bit and have come up with this bit of a "hack", but it's still not a clean output:

var msd = new ModelStateDictionary();
msd.AddModelError("status", "-1");
msd.AddModelError("substatus", "3");
msd.AddModelError("message", "invalid stuff");
throw new HttpResponseException(Request.CreateErrorResponse(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest, msd));

edit
looks like a custom HttpError is what I need. This seems to do the trick, now to make it extensible from my business layer...

var error = new HttpError("invalid stuff") {{"status", -1}, {"substatus", 3}};
throw new HttpResponseException(Request.CreateErrorResponse(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest, error));
45

These answers are way more complicated than they need to be.

public static class WebApiConfig
{
    public static void Register(HttpConfiguration config)
    {
        config.Filters.Add(new HandleApiExceptionAttribute());
        // ...
    }
}

public class HandleApiExceptionAttribute : ExceptionFilterAttribute
{
    public override void OnException(HttpActionExecutedContext context)
    {
        var request = context.ActionContext.Request;

        var response = new
        {
             //Properties go here...
        };

        context.Response = request.CreateResponse(HttpStatusCode.BadRequest, response);
    }
}

That's all you need. It's also nice and easy to unit test:

[Test]
public async void OnException_ShouldBuildProperErrorResponse()
{
    var expected = new 
    {
         //Properties go here...
    };

    //Setup
    var target = new HandleApiExceptionAttribute()

    var contextMock = BuildContextMock();

    //Act
    target.OnException(contextMock);

    dynamic actual = await contextMock.Response.Content.ReadAsAsync<ExpandoObject>();

    Assert.AreEqual(expected.Aproperty, actual.Aproperty);
}

private HttpActionExecutedContext BuildContextMock()
{
    var requestMock = new HttpRequestMessage();
    requestMock.Properties.Add(HttpPropertyKeys.HttpConfigurationKey, new HttpConfiguration());

    return new HttpActionExecutedContext()
    {
        ActionContext = new HttpActionContext
        {
            ControllerContext = new HttpControllerContext
            {
                Request = requestMock
            }

        },
        Exception = new Exception()
    };
}
3
  • Excellent answer, +1 for also including appropriate test – xingyu Feb 4 '15 at 22:42
  • Make sure you have using System.Net.Http; – Sal Feb 7 '17 at 17:02
  • This is by far the best answer. More robust and easy to implement. In my variation, in the anonymous object, I added some properties with the exception message and other helpful hints for debugging. Thanks! – Nelson Rodriguez Feb 8 '17 at 19:31
9

I think this will do the trick:

Create a custom exception class for the business layer:

 public class MyException: Exception
 {
    public ResponseStatus Status { get; private set; }
    public ResponseSubStatus SubStatus { get; private set; }
    public new string Message { get; private set; }

    public MyException()
    {}

    public MyException(ResponseStatus status, ResponseSubStatus subStatus, string message)
    {
        Status = status;
        SubStatus = subStatus;
        Message = message;
    }
 }

Create a static method to generate a HttpError from an instance of MyException. I'm using reflection here so I can add properties to MyException and always have them returned w/o updating Create:

    public static HttpError Create<T>(MyException exception) where T:Exception
    {
        var properties = exception.GetType().GetProperties(BindingFlags.Instance 
                                                         | BindingFlags.Public 
                                                         | BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly);
        var error = new HttpError();
        foreach (var propertyInfo in properties)
        {
            error.Add(propertyInfo.Name, propertyInfo.GetValue(exception, null));
        }
        return error;
    }

I currently have a custom attribute for a general exception handler. All exceptions of type MyException will be handled here:

public class ExceptionHandlingAttribute : ExceptionFilterAttribute
{
    public override void OnException(HttpActionExecutedContext context)
    {
        var statusCode = HttpStatusCode.InternalServerError;

        if (context.Exception is MyException)
        {
            statusCode = HttpStatusCode.BadRequest;
            throw new HttpResponseException(context.Request.CreateErrorResponse(statusCode, HttpErrorHelper.Create(context.Exception)));
        }

        if (context.Exception is AuthenticationException)
            statusCode = HttpStatusCode.Forbidden;

        throw new HttpResponseException(context.Request.CreateErrorResponse(statusCode, context.Exception.Message));
    }
}

I'll play around with this a bit more and update as I find holes in this plan.

1
  • 3
    Why are you hiding the Message property? Wouldn't it be safer to call the base ctor and pass the message that way? – Andy Jul 3 '14 at 17:07
2

Take a look at the following article. It will help you gain control over your web api exceptions and error messages: Web Api, HttpError, and the Behavior of Exceptions

2
  • 1
    Thanks. That's similar to what I'm doing - creating a custom ExceptionFilterAttribute – earthling Jun 6 '13 at 17:54
  • 3
    That site is no longer available – TravisO Jul 7 '17 at 20:57

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