I have a large amount of data in a collection in mongodb which I need to analyze. How do i import that data to pandas?

I am new to pandas and numpy.

EDIT: The mongodb collection contains sensor values tagged with date and time. The sensor values are of float datatype.

Sample Data:

{
"_cls" : "SensorReport",
"_id" : ObjectId("515a963b78f6a035d9fa531b"),
"_types" : [
    "SensorReport"
],
"Readings" : [
    {
        "a" : 0.958069536790466,
        "_types" : [
            "Reading"
        ],
        "ReadingUpdatedDate" : ISODate("2013-04-02T08:26:35.297Z"),
        "b" : 6.296118156595,
        "_cls" : "Reading"
    },
    {
        "a" : 0.95574014778624,
        "_types" : [
            "Reading"
        ],
        "ReadingUpdatedDate" : ISODate("2013-04-02T08:27:09.963Z"),
        "b" : 6.29651468650064,
        "_cls" : "Reading"
    },
    {
        "a" : 0.953648289182713,
        "_types" : [
            "Reading"
        ],
        "ReadingUpdatedDate" : ISODate("2013-04-02T08:27:37.545Z"),
        "b" : 7.29679823731148,
        "_cls" : "Reading"
    },
    {
        "a" : 0.955931884300997,
        "_types" : [
            "Reading"
        ],
        "ReadingUpdatedDate" : ISODate("2013-04-02T08:28:21.369Z"),
        "b" : 6.29642922525632,
        "_cls" : "Reading"
    },
    {
        "a" : 0.95821381,
        "_types" : [
            "Reading"
        ],
        "ReadingUpdatedDate" : ISODate("2013-04-02T08:41:20.801Z"),
        "b" : 7.28956613,
        "_cls" : "Reading"
    },
    {
        "a" : 4.95821335,
        "_types" : [
            "Reading"
        ],
        "ReadingUpdatedDate" : ISODate("2013-04-02T08:41:36.931Z"),
        "b" : 6.28956574,
        "_cls" : "Reading"
    },
    {
        "a" : 9.95821341,
        "_types" : [
            "Reading"
        ],
        "ReadingUpdatedDate" : ISODate("2013-04-02T08:42:09.971Z"),
        "b" : 0.28956488,
        "_cls" : "Reading"
    },
    {
        "a" : 1.95667927,
        "_types" : [
            "Reading"
        ],
        "ReadingUpdatedDate" : ISODate("2013-04-02T08:43:55.463Z"),
        "b" : 0.29115237,
        "_cls" : "Reading"
    }
],
"latestReportTime" : ISODate("2013-04-02T08:43:55.463Z"),
"sensorName" : "56847890-0",
"reportCount" : 8
}
  • Using a custom field type with MongoEngine can make storing and retrieving Pandas DataFrames as simple as mongo_doc.data_frame = my_pandas_df – Jthorpe Jul 15 '17 at 16:04

11 Answers 11

up vote 88 down vote accepted

pymongo might give you a hand, followings are some codes I'm using:

import pandas as pd
from pymongo import MongoClient


def _connect_mongo(host, port, username, password, db):
    """ A util for making a connection to mongo """

    if username and password:
        mongo_uri = 'mongodb://%s:%s@%s:%s/%s' % (username, password, host, port, db)
        conn = MongoClient(mongo_uri)
    else:
        conn = MongoClient(host, port)


    return conn[db]


def read_mongo(db, collection, query={}, host='localhost', port=27017, username=None, password=None, no_id=True):
    """ Read from Mongo and Store into DataFrame """

    # Connect to MongoDB
    db = _connect_mongo(host=host, port=port, username=username, password=password, db=db)

    # Make a query to the specific DB and Collection
    cursor = db[collection].find(query)

    # Expand the cursor and construct the DataFrame
    df =  pd.DataFrame(list(cursor))

    # Delete the _id
    if no_id:
        del df['_id']

    return df
  • Thanks, this is the method i ended up using. I also had an array of embedded documents in each row. So I had to iterate that as well within each row. Is there a better way to do this?? – Nithin Apr 29 '13 at 6:42
  • Is it possible to provide some samples of your mongodb's structure? – waitingkuo Apr 29 '13 at 7:01
  • Look at edit for a sample data row. An array of the embedded document "Reading" is stored inside readings. Now i am doing a query to find multiple records and then iterate through each reading in the readings array for each and every record. Is there any easier way to import data in my case? – Nithin Apr 29 '13 at 10:43
  • 1
    Note the list() inside df = pd.DataFrame(list(cursor)) evaluates as a list or generator, to keep the CPU cool. If u have a zillionty-one data items, and the next few lines would have reasonably partioned, level-of-detailed, and clipped them, the whole shmegegge is still safe to drop in. Nice. – Phlip Sep 22 '15 at 13:33

You can load your mongodb data to pandas DataFrame using this code. It works for me. Hopefully for you too.

import pymongo
import pandas as pd
from pymongo import MongoClient
client = MongoClient()
db = client.database_name
collection = db.collection_name
data = pd.DataFrame(list(collection.find()))

Monary does exactly that, and it's super fast. (another link)

See this cool post which includes a quick tutorial and some timings.

  • Does Monary support string data type ? – Snehal Parmar Jan 1 '15 at 7:44
  • I tried Monary, but it is taking a lot of time. Am I missing some optimization? Tried client = Monary(host, 27017, database="db_tmp") columns = ["col1", "col2"] data_type = ["int64", "int64"] arrays = client.query("db_tmp", "coll", {}, columns, data_type) For 50000 records takes around 200s. – Nishant Kumar Nov 27 '17 at 11:09
  • That sounds extremely slow... Frankly, I don't know what the status of this project is, now, 4 years later... – shx2 Nov 27 '17 at 13:54
import pandas as pd
from odo import odo

data = odo('mongodb://localhost/db::collection', pd.DataFrame)

As per PEP, simple is better than complicated:

import pandas as pd
df = pd.DataFrame.from_records(db.<database_name>.<collection_name>.find())

You can include conditions as you would working with regular mongoDB database or even use find_one() to get only one element from the database, etc.

and voila!

For dealing with out-of-core (not fitting into RAM) data efficiently (i.e. with parallel execution), you can try Python Blaze ecosystem: Blaze / Dask / Odo.

Blaze (and Odo) has out-of-the-box functions to deal with MongoDB.

A few useful articles to start off:

And an article which shows what amazing things are possible with Blaze stack: Analyzing 1.7 Billion Reddit Comments with Blaze and Impala (essentially, querying 975 Gb of Reddit comments in seconds).

P.S. I'm not affiliated with any of these technologies.

  • 1
    I've also written a post using Jupyter Notebook with an example how Dask helps to speedup execution even on a data fitting into memory by using multiple cores on a single machine. – Dennis Golomazov Sep 27 '16 at 23:53

http://docs.mongodb.org/manual/reference/mongoexport

export to csv and use read_csv or JSON and use DataFrame.from_records

  • 2
    It's DataFrame.from_records(). – Morten Apr 23 '14 at 14:12

Using

pandas.DataFrame(list(...))

will consume a lot of memory if the iterator/generator result is large

better to generate small chunks and concat at the end

def iterator2dataframes(iterator, chunk_size: int):
  """Turn an iterator into multiple small pandas.DataFrame

  This is a balance between memory and efficiency
  """
  records = []
  frames = []
  for i, record in enumerate(iterator):
    records.append(record)
    if i % chunk_size == chunk_size - 1:
      frames.append(pd.DataFrame(records))
      records = []
  if records:
    frames.append(pd.DataFrame(records))
  return pd.concat(frames)

A similar approach like Rafael Valero, waitingkuo and Deu Leung using pagination:

def read_mongo(
       # db, 
       collection, query=None, 
       # host='localhost', port=27017, username=None, password=None,
       chunksize = 100, page_num=1, no_id=True):

    # Connect to MongoDB
    db = _connect_mongo(host=host, port=port, username=username, password=password, db=db)

    # Calculate number of documents to skip
    skips = chunksize * (page_num - 1)

    # Sorry, this is in spanish
    # https://www.toptal.com/python/c%C3%B3digo-buggy-python-los-10-errores-m%C3%A1s-comunes-que-cometen-los-desarrolladores-python/es
    if not query:
        query = {}

    # Make a query to the specific DB and Collection
    cursor = db[collection].find(query).skip(skips).limit(chunksize)

    # Expand the cursor and construct the DataFrame
    df =  pd.DataFrame(list(cursor))

    # Delete the _id
    if no_id:
        del df['_id']

    return df

Another option I found very useful is:

from pandas.io.json import json_normalize

cursor = my_collection.find()
df = json_normalize(cursor)

this way you get the unfolding of nested mongodb documents for free.

  • 1
    I got an error with this method TypeError: data argument can't be an iterator – Gabriel Fair Apr 2 at 11:50

Following this great answer by waitingkuo I would like to add the possibility of doing that using chunksize in line with .read_sql() and .read_csv(). I enlarge the answer from Deu Leung by avoiding go one by one each 'record' of the 'iterator' / 'cursor'. I will borrow previous read_mongo function.

def read_mongo(db, 
           collection, query={}, 
           host='localhost', port=27017, 
           username=None, password=None,
           chunksize = 100, no_id=True):
""" Read from Mongo and Store into DataFrame """


# Connect to MongoDB
#db = _connect_mongo(host=host, port=port, username=username, password=password, db=db)
client = MongoClient(host=host, port=port)
# Make a query to the specific DB and Collection
db_aux = client[db]


# Some variables to create the chunks
skips_variable = range(0, db_aux[collection].find(query).count(), int(chunksize))
if len(skips_variable)<=1:
    skips_variable = [0,len(skips_variable)]

# Iteration to create the dataframe in chunks.
for i in range(1,len(skips_variable)):

    # Expand the cursor and construct the DataFrame
    #df_aux =pd.DataFrame(list(cursor_aux[skips_variable[i-1]:skips_variable[i]]))
    df_aux =pd.DataFrame(list(db_aux[collection].find(query)[skips_variable[i-1]:skips_variable[i]]))

    if no_id:
        del df_aux['_id']

    # Concatenate the chunks into a unique df
    if 'df' not in locals():
        df =  df_aux
    else:
        df = pd.concat([df, df_aux], ignore_index=True)

return df

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