265

We have a big application on the site and we have a few links which are, let's say blue color like the blue links on this site. Now I want to make some other links, but with lighter color. Obviously I can just do simply by the hex code adding in the CSS file, but our site lets user decide what colors they want for their customized profile/site (like Twitter).

So, my question is: can we reduce the color by percentage?

Let's say the following code is CSS:

a {
  color: blue;
}

a.lighter {
  color: -50%; // obviously not correct way, but just an idea
}

OR

a.lighter {
  color: blue -50%;  // again not correct, but another example of setting color and then reducing it
}

Is there a way to reduce a color by a percentage?

  • 1
    I'm not into CSS, but what does reducing a color mean? Make it more transparent? Or do you want to change the individual RGB channels of the color? – StampedeXV Oct 26 '09 at 16:16
  • no, not the transparent, but making the color reduce by hex or rbg or hsl – Basit Oct 26 '09 at 16:21
  • @basit You might want to consider making the question title more specific so that it can more easily be found in the future by others with a similar problem. – ctford Oct 26 '09 at 16:37
  • any suggestions on what title should i use instead? – Basit Oct 26 '09 at 20:55
  • 1
    If you wont, you can manually chose a color using for example this online tool: hexcolortool.com – simhumileco Nov 29 '17 at 5:19

25 Answers 25

249

If you're using a stack which lets you use SASS, you can use the lighten function:

$linkcolour: #0000FF;

a {
  color: $linkcolour;
}

a.lighter {
  color: lighten($linkcolour, 50%);
}
  • 21
    This facility has added my interest in SASS. – Satya Prakash Jan 16 '12 at 7:57
  • 32
    LESS also has this, by the way. – Camilo Martin Sep 12 '12 at 10:38
  • 15
    If you want to do this using pure CSS3: stackoverflow.com/a/13722836/623548 – asleepysamurai Jul 3 '13 at 6:50
  • 1
    how to do it when backround color is dynamically set in inlines? but I just want always darken it when hovered? – andilabs Jan 30 '17 at 13:24
  • 1
    Great... Darken also works the same way like lighten which resolved my problem. – Rishabh Wadhwa Sep 17 '17 at 11:17
330

You can now kind of do this with CSS filters. Support is iffy cross browsers but as the spec continues to get implemented and cleaned up, this is going to be really handy.

.button {
  color: #ff0000;
}

/* note: 100% is baseline so 85% is slightly darker, 
   20% would be significantly darker */
.button:hover {
  filter: brightness(85%);
}
<button class="button">Foo lorem ipsum</button>

Here's some reading about the various filters you can use: http://code.tutsplus.com/tutorials/say-hello-to-webkit-filters--net-23318

Update

This seems to be getting more and more upvotes as filters make their way into the mainstream. Here's current compatibility: http://caniuse.com/#feat=css-filters

  • 29
    Also note that the brightness() level is not limited to 100%. You can make it brighter than the original too. – Adam Katz Oct 8 '16 at 1:05
  • 3
    Filter will also apply to any background-image associated with your element. Say if you decorate your links with an icon this way the icon brightness will be altered by that filter. – Slion Mar 22 '17 at 11:08
  • 1
    According to... caniuse.com/#feat=css-filters ... IE11 doesn't support this... and according to... w3counter.com/globalstats.php?year=2017&month=8 ... IE11 is still in the top 10 most used browsers. While I would love to use this feature, until IE11 dies, it doesn't look like I will. :-( – OldTimeGuitarGuy Sep 29 '17 at 16:44
  • For IE 11, try: github.com/Schepp/CSS-Filters-Polyfill – see sharper Apr 4 '18 at 5:34
  • 3
    @imjared This must be selected as answer... Thanks. – Jack Dec 14 '18 at 10:54
97

There is "opacity" which will make the background shine through:

opacity: 0.5;

but I'm not sure this is what you mean. Define "reduce color": Make transparent? Or add white?

  • no, not opacity, but add white i guess – Basit Oct 26 '09 at 16:22
  • 7
    @Basit "I guess"? You should know. But in any case, if your background is white, you can "fake" brightness by making it more transparent - I've used this to good effect recently. – Camilo Martin Sep 12 '12 at 10:39
  • 2
    The "opacity" trick also work if the background is black (opacity 0.5 makes the color darker on black background). – Julien Kronegg Nov 8 '12 at 8:44
  • 1
    This is great for adding a dynamic color change for a hover effect. – Spartacus Sep 5 '17 at 19:46
  • If this is for the css background: rather than foreground: as far as the meaning of "lighter" or "brighter" and the Google search, this is probably the answer most people are looking for. Also, no worries about support: caniuse.com/#feat=css-opacity – JoePC Oct 3 at 23:08
53

HSL Colors provide an answer, a HSL color value is specified with: hsl(hue [0,255], saturation %, lightness %).

HSL is supported in IE9+, Firefox, Chrome, Safari, and in Opera 10+

a
{
color:hsl(240,65%,50%);
}
a.lighter 
{
color:hsl(240,65%,75%);
}
18

In LESS, you would use the following variables:

@primary-color: #999;
@primary-color-lighter: lighten(@primary-color, 20%);

This would take the 1st variable and lighten it by 20% (or any other percentage). In this example, you'd end up with your lighter color being: #ccc

15

If you want darker color, you can use rgba black with low opacity:

rgba(0,0,0,0.3)

For lighter use white:

rgba(255,255,255,0.3).
  • 13
    This relies on what the background is because it becomes translucent, not lighter – bryc Jan 23 '17 at 3:42
13

As far as I know, there's no way you can do this in CSS.

But I think that a little server-side logic could easily do as you suggest. CSS stylesheets are normally static assets, but there is no reason they couldn't be dynamically generated by server-side code. Your server-side script would:

  1. Check a URL parameter to determine the user and therefore the user's chosen colour. Use a URL parameter rather than a session variable so that you can still cache the CSS.
  2. Break up the colour into its red, green and blue components
  3. Increment each of the three components by a set amount. Experiment with this to get the results you are after.
  4. Generate CSS incorporating the new colour

Links to this CSS-generating page would look something like:

<link rel="stylesheet" href="http://yoursite.com/custom.ashx?user=1231">

If you don't use the .css extension be sure to set the MIME-type correctly so that the browser knows to interpret the file as CSS.

(Note that to make colours lighter you have to raise each of the RGB values)

  • There are javaScript based approaches around that might be easier to implement. See e.g. experts-exchange.com/Programming/Languages/Scripting/JavaScript/… – Pekka 웃 Oct 26 '09 at 16:29
  • Interesting suggestion. Would there be a risk of colours flickering as the page loaded if you used JS? – ctford Oct 26 '09 at 16:31
  • I've used techniques like this -- each user gets his own style sheet -- in conjunction with a preferences page where the user specified color selections. Note you don't have to copy the entire style sheet, and shouldn't. You can have multiple style sheets in a page, so you can have a generic style sheet for the stuff that's the same for everybody and then a custom style sheet for the stuff that's different. In our case we had a default custom style sheet for the (majority of) users who just took the default. – Jay Oct 26 '09 at 16:52
  • 2
    SOLUTION: stackoverflow.com/questions/1507931/… – Basit Oct 26 '09 at 21:02
  • 1
    Now that HSL values are supported (IE9+, Firefox, Chrome, Safari, and in Opera 10+) it's possible to just change the lightness without all of the effort calculating a new rgb (w3schools.com/cssref/css_colors_legal.asp) ... scroll down to the HSL / HSLA section... – slushy Jun 17 '14 at 11:52
12

if you decide to use http://compass-style.org/, a sass-based css framework, it provides very useful darken() and lighten() sass functions to dynamically generate css. it's very clean:

@import compass/utilities

$link_color: #bb8f8f
a
  color: $link_color
a:visited
  color: $link_color
a:hover
  color: darken($link_color,10)

generates

a {
  color: #bb8f8f;
}

a:visited {
  color: #bb8f8f;
}

a:hover {
  color: #a86f6f;
}
12

At the time of writing, here's the best pure CSS implementation for color manipulation I found:

Use CSS variables to define your colors in HSL instead of HEX/RGB format, then use calc() to manipulate them.

Here's a basic example:

:root {
  --link-color-h: 211;
  --link-color-s: 100%;
  --link-color-l: 50%;
  --link-color-hsl: var(--link-color-h), var(--link-color-s), var(--link-color-l);

  --link-color: hsl(var(--link-color-hsl));
  --link-color-10: hsla(var(--link-color-hsl), .1);
  --link-color-20: hsla(var(--link-color-hsl), .2);
  --link-color-30: hsla(var(--link-color-hsl), .3);
  --link-color-40: hsla(var(--link-color-hsl), .4);
  --link-color-50: hsla(var(--link-color-hsl), .5);
  --link-color-60: hsla(var(--link-color-hsl), .6);
  --link-color-70: hsla(var(--link-color-hsl), .7);
  --link-color-80: hsla(var(--link-color-hsl), .8);
  --link-color-90: hsla(var(--link-color-hsl), .9);

  --link-color-warm: hsl(calc(var(--link-color-h) + 80), var(--link-color-s), var(--link-color-l));
  --link-color-cold: hsl(calc(var(--link-color-h) - 80), var(--link-color-s), var(--link-color-l));

  --link-color-low: hsl(var(--link-color-h), calc(var(--link-color-s) / 2), var(--link-color-l));
  --link-color-lowest: hsl(var(--link-color-h), calc(var(--link-color-s) / 4), var(--link-color-l));

  --link-color-light: hsl(var(--link-color-h), var(--link-color-s), calc(var(--link-color-l) / .9));
  --link-color-dark: hsl(var(--link-color-h), var(--link-color-s), calc(var(--link-color-l) * .9));
}

.flex {
  display: flex;
}

.flex > div {
  flex: 1;
  height: calc(100vw / 10);
}
<h3>Color Manipulation (alpha)</h3>

<div class="flex">
  <div style="background-color: var(--link-color-10)"></div>
  <div style="background-color: var(--link-color-20)"></div>
  <div style="background-color: var(--link-color-30)"></div>
  <div style="background-color: var(--link-color-40)"></div>
  <div style="background-color: var(--link-color-50)"></div>
  <div style="background-color: var(--link-color-60)"></div>
  <div style="background-color: var(--link-color-70)"></div>
  <div style="background-color: var(--link-color-80)"></div>
  <div style="background-color: var(--link-color-90)"></div>
  <div style="background-color: var(--link-color)"></div>
</div>

<h3>Color Manipulation (Hue)</h3>

<div class="flex">
  <div style="background-color: var(--link-color-warm)"></div>
  <div style="background-color: var(--link-color)"></div>
  <div style="background-color: var(--link-color-cold)"></div>
</div>

<h3>Color Manipulation (Saturation)</h3>

<div class="flex">
  <div style="background-color: var(--link-color)"></div>
  <div style="background-color: var(--link-color-low)"></div>
  <div style="background-color: var(--link-color-lowest)"></div>
</div>

<h3>Color Manipulation (Lightness)</h3>

<div class="flex">
  <div style="background-color: var(--link-color-light)"></div>
  <div style="background-color: var(--link-color)"></div>
  <div style="background-color: var(--link-color-dark)"></div>
</div>

I also created a CSS framework (still in early stage) to provide basic CSS variables support called root-variables.

5

You could use a little javascript to calculate the darker and lighter color using the rgb().

Fiddle : Not really nice, but it is just for illustration.

What it essentially does is sets a color and selects 20 colors with the same amount (compared to one another) of rgb only with 10 apart.

for (var i=-10; i < $('.row:eq(0) .block').length/2 ; i++) {
 var r = 91;
 var g = 192;
 var b = 222;
 $('.row:eq(1) .block:eq('+(i+10)+')').css('background' , color(r+(i*10),g+(i*10),b+   (i*10))      );
};
5

This is an old question, but most of the answers require the use of a preprocessor or JavaScript to operate, or they not only affect the color of the element but also the color of the elements contained within it. I am going to add a kind-of-complicated CSS-only way of doing the same thing. Probably in the future, with the more advanced CSS functions, it will be easier to do.

The idea is based on using:

  • RGB colors, so you have separate values for red, green, and blue;
  • CSS variables, to store the color values and the darkness; and
  • The calc function, to apply the change.

By default darkness will be 1 (for 100%, the regular color), and if you multiply by a number between 0 and 1, you'll be making the color darker. For example, if you multiply by 0.85 each of the values, you'll be making the colors 15% darker (100% - 15% = 85% = 0.85).

Here is an example, I created three classes: .dark, .darker, and .darkest that will make the original color 25%, 50%, and 75% darker respectively:

html {
  --clarity: 1;
}

div {
  display: inline-block;
  height: 100px;
  width: 100px;
  line-height: 100px;
  color: white;
  text-align: center;
  font-family: arial, sans-serif;
  font-size: 20px;
  background: rgba(
                  calc(var(--r) * var(--clarity)), 
                  calc(var(--g) * var(--clarity)), 
                  calc(var(--b) * var(--clarity))
                );
}

.dark    { --clarity: 0.75; }
.darker  { --clarity: 0.50; }
.darkest { --clarity: 0.25; }

.red {
  --r: 255;
  --g: 0;
  --b: 0;
}

.purple {
  --r: 205;
  --g: 30;
  --b: 205;
}
<div class="red">0%</div>
<div class="red dark">25%</div>
<div class="red darker">50%</div>
<div class="red darkest">75%</div>

<br/><br/>

<div class="purple">0%</div>
<div class="purple dark">25%</div>
<div class="purple darker">50%</div>
<div class="purple darkest">75%</div>

4

One simple answer is to use a 50% transparent white PNG over the color:

div {
    background-color:red;
}

div:hover {
    background-image:url('lighten.png');
}

Where lighten.png is a PNG of a white fill with 50% transparency.

  • Great hack! well done! – linjunhalida Sep 15 '13 at 4:07
  • 6
    This is bad for two reasons: 1. You load an extra file on hover. 2. Buttons will have different sizes. – Andrei Cristian Prodan Oct 16 '13 at 9:06
  • 9
    Even better would be to use base-64 encoded image to skip extra file load. – awe Mar 24 '14 at 8:48
  • 1
    It's very old solution which was useful so long ago. Now you'd better not to use it. Just use filter/hsl/opacity etc. Just not use ugly image loading way if you can resolve it in program way – Velidan Jun 15 '18 at 8:04
  • 1
    This is really a terrible hack, whatever you do, do not do this – Wannes Dec 26 '18 at 20:14
3

Not directly, no. But you could use a site, such as colorschemedesigner.com, that will give you your base color and then give you the hex and rgb codes for different ranges of your base color.

Once I find my color schemes for my site, I put the hex codes for the colors and name them inside a comment section at the top of my stylesheet.

Some other color scheme generators include:

2

You could use RGBa ('a' being alpha transparency), but it's not widely supported yet. It will be, though, so you could use it now and add a fallback:

a:link { 
    color: rgb(0,0,255); 
    }
a:link.lighter {
    color: rgb(128,128,255); /* This gets applied only in browsers that don't apply the rgba line */
    }
a:link.lighter { /* This comes after the previous line, so has priority in supporting browsers */
    color: rgba(0,0,255,0.5); /* last value is transparency */
    }
  • this might help alot, if its supported in major browsers. – Basit Oct 26 '09 at 21:05
2

Try:

a {
  color: hsl(240, 100%, 50%);
}

a:hover {
  color: hsl(240, 100%, 70%);
}
  • 1
    Thanks for your answer - you should note that it is a duplicate of one of the other answers. It is best to check the other answers before replying. – ralight Jan 31 '14 at 9:50
  • 2
    Thank you for that hint. It seems that I've missed the other answer, sorry. – LordRathan Jan 31 '14 at 10:05
1

Bringing it all together, a table solution done purely with DIV and CSS, try it ;) The browser should support RGBA colors though....

<head>
<style>
    .colored-div-table {
        display: table;
        table-layout: fixed;
    }
    .colored-div-table #col {
        display: table-column;
    }
    .colored-div-table #col:nth-child(odd) {
    }
    .colored-div-table #col:nth-child(even) {
    }
    .colored-div-table #col:nth-child(1){
        background-color: lightblue;
        width: 50px !important;
    }
    .colored-div-table #col:nth-child(2){
        background-color: lightyellow;
        width: 200px !important;
    }
    .colored-div-table #col:nth-child(3){
        background-color: lightcyan;
        width: 50px !important;
    }
    .colored-div-table #row {
        display: table-row;
    }
    .colored-div-table #row div {
        display: table-cell;
    }
    .colored-div-table #row div:nth-child(1) {

    }
    .colored-div-table #row div:nth-child(2) {
    }
    .colored-div-table #row div:nth-child(3) {
    }
    .colored-div-table #row:nth-child(odd) {
        background-color: rgba(0,0,0,0.1)
    }
    .colored-div-table #row:nth-child(even) {
    }
</style>
</head>
<body>

<div id="divtable" class="colored-div-table">
    <div id="col"></div>
    <div id="col"></div>
    <div id="col"></div>  

    <div id="row">
        <div>First Line</div><div>FL C2</div><div>FL C3></div>
    </div>

    <div id="row">
        <div>Second Line</div><div>SL C2</div><div>SL C3></div>
    </div>

    <div id="row">
        <div>Third Line</div><div>TL C2</div><div>TL C3></div>
    </div>

    <div id="row">
        <div>Forth Line</div><div>FL C2</div><div>FL C3></div>
    </div>
    <div id="row">
        <div>Fifth Line</div><div>FL C2</div><div>FL C3></div>
    </div>
    <div id="row">
        <div>Sixth Line</div><div>SL C2</div><div>SL C3></div>
    </div>
    <div id="row">
        <div>Seventh Line</div><div>SL C2</div><div>SL C3></div>
    </div>
    <div id="row">
        <div>Eight Line</div><div>EL C2</div><div>EL C3></div>
    </div>
    <div id="row">
        <div>Nineth Line</div><div>NL C2</div><div>NL C3></div>
    </div>
    <div id="row">
        <div>Tenth Line</div><div>TL C2</div><div>TL C3></div>
    </div>

</div>
</body>
1

I know it's late but, you could use a wrapper to your buttons and change a rgba color function opacity level, as said in other answers but with no explicit example.

Here's a pen:

https://codepen.io/aronkof/pen/WzGmjR

#wrapper {
  width: 50vw;
  height: 50vh;
  background-color: #AAA;
  margin: 20px auto;
  border-radius: 5px;
  display: grid;
  place-items: center;
} 

.btn-wrap {
  background-color: #000;
  display: inline-block;
}

button {
  transition: all 0.6s linear;
  background-color: rgba(0, 255, 0, 1);
  border: none;
  outline: none;
  color: #fff;
  padding: 50px;
  font-weight: 700;
  font-size: 2em;
}

button:hover {
  background-color: rgba(0, 255, 0, .5);
}
<div id="wrapper">
  <div class="btn-wrap">
    <button class="btn">HEY!</buutton>
  </div>
</div>

1

If you only need to change background color, this is a great approach that is futureproof - Use linear-gradient method on background image!

Check out the example below:

document
  .getElementById('colorpicker')
  .addEventListener('change', function(event) {
    document
      .documentElement
      .style.setProperty('--color', event.target.value);
  });
span {
  display: inline-block;
  border-radius: 20px;
  height: 40px;
  width: 40px;
  vertical-align: middle;
}

.red {
  background-color: red;
}

.red-darker {
  background: linear-gradient(
    to top,
    rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.25),
    rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.25)
  ) red;
}

:root {
  --color: lime;
}

.dynamic-color {
  background-color: var(--color);
}

.dynamic-color-darker {
  background: linear-gradient(
    to top,
    rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.25),
    rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.25)
  ) var(--color);
}
<table>
  <tr>
    <td><strong>Static Color</strong></td>
    <td><span class="red"></span></td>
    <td><span class="red-darker"></span></td>
  </tr>
  <tr>
    <td><strong>Dynamic Color</strong></td>
    <td><span class="dynamic-color"></span></td>
    <td><span class="dynamic-color-darker"></span></td>
  </tr>
</table>
<br/>
Change the dynamic color: <input id="colorpicker" value="#00ff00" type="color"/>

Credits: https://css-tricks.com/css-custom-properties-theming/

  • 1
    This is a very clever answer. I've seen production code that uses this: background-image: linear-gradient(rgba(0,0,0,0.30), rgba(0,0,0,0.30)); – Stubbs Jul 23 at 21:30
1

If you need to brute force it for older browser compatibility, you can use Colllor to automatically select similar color variations.

Example (color: #a9dbb4):

enter image description here

0

See my comment on Ctford's reply.

I'd think the easy way to lighten a color would be to take each of the RGB components, add to 0xff and divide by 2. If that doesn't give the exact results you want, take 0xff minus the current value times some constant and then add back to the current value. For example if you want to shift 1/3 of the way toward white, take (0xff - current)/3+current.

You'd have to play with it to see what results you got. I would worry that with this simple a formula, a factor big enough to make dark colors fade nicely might make light colors turn completely white, while a factor small enough to make light colors only lighten a little might make dark colors not lighten enough.

Still, I think going by a fraction of the distance to white is more promising than a fixed number of steps.

0

I found a PHP class that let me do this server side. I just output an inline CSS color style for whatever I need to be lighter/darker. Works great.

http://www.barelyfitz.com/projects/csscolor/

(note that the class uses PEAR for throwing errors, but I didn't want to include PEAR just to modify colors, so I just removed all the PEAR references)

I turned it into a static class with static methods so I can call "lighten" & "darken" functions directly without creating a new object.

Sample usage:

$original_color = 'E58D8D';  
$lighter_color = Css::lighten($original_color, .7);  
$darker_color = Css::darken($original_color, .7);
0

I am adding an answer using raw CSS3 and SVG without requiring LESS or SASS.

Basically, if the question is to make a colour 10%,25%,50% ligher or darker for the sakes of a global hover effect you can create an SVG data call like this

:root{
--lighten-bg: url('data:image/svg+xml;utf8,<svg version="1.1" id="cssLighten" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" width="50px" height="50px" viewBox="0 0 50 50" enable-background="new 0 0 50 50" xml:space="preserve"><rect opacity="0.2" fill="white" width="50" height="50"/></svg>') !important;
--darken-bg: url('data:image/svg+xml;utf8,<svg version="1.1" id="cssDarken" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg" xmlns:xlink="http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink" width="50px" height="50px" viewBox="0 0 50 50" enable-background="new 0 0 50 50" xml:space="preserve"><rect opacity="0.2" fill="black" width="50" height="50"/></svg>') !important;

}

.myButton{
    color: white;
    background-color:blue;
}
.myButton:hover{
    background-image: var(--lighten-bg);
}

For some reason, unknown to me, the SVG won't allow me to enter a hex value in the "fill" attribute but "white" and "black" satisfy my need.

Food for thought: If you didn't mind using images, just use a 50% transparent PNG as the background image. If you wanted to be fancy, call a PHP script as the background image and pass it the HEX and OPACITY values and let it spit out the SVG code above.

-1

You can use a JavaScript library such as JXtension which gives the user the ability to make a color lighter or darker. If you would like to find documentation for this brand new library, click here. You can also use JXtension to combine one color with another.

-1

It looks like jPaq (http://jpaq.org/) is the replacement for JXtension. The benefit of using jPaq is the fact that you can download only what you need instead of the full JavaScript library. Here is a link to the download page for just the Color class: http://jpaq.org/download/1.0.0.1008.

-3

I wrote a plugin for jquery that hadles this same issue. I take the color as a property, or the set color of the css property they want, and run it through some calculations. Hex to RGB, then multiply offset percent, then return a new value. Let me know if you want an example.

  • 1
    This would be a good answer if you had included the plugin here. – not my job May 21 '17 at 20:12

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