47

I'm quite new to rails and have been trying to work this out all night with no luck.

I have created 3 models: users, businesses, and business_hours. I have also added the associations (business_hours belongs_to businesses which belongs_to users) and (user has_one business which has_many business_hours).

Reading through the docs online it seems I now need to create the foreign keys for these relationships in my DB tables. How do I do this using Rails ActiveRecord migrations? I'm using PostgreSQL as my DB.

4 Answers 4

76

The currently accepted answer on this isn't really accurate as it doesn't add a database foreign key. It's just adding integer columns.

In Rails 4.2.x, the current approach is:

http://guides.rubyonrails.org/active_record_migrations.html#foreign-keys

Create a migration:

rails generate migration migration_name

For existing columns, in the migration add the foreign keys like this:

class MigrationName < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    add_foreign_key :business_hours, :businesses
    add_foreign_key :businesses, :users
  end
end

For Rails 4.x or if you're adding a new column and want it to be a foreign key you can do this, where you probably also want to specify the index as true, but that's not part of the requirement for the foreign key:

http://edgeguides.rubyonrails.org/active_record_migrations.html#creating-a-migration

class MigrationName < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    add_reference :business_hours, :business, index: true, foreign_key: true
    add_reference :businesses, :user, index: true, foreign_key: true
  end
end
4
  • 1
    Thanks for sharing this Chris. I looked all over to figure this out.
    – mack
    Oct 16, 2015 at 14:46
  • This is what I was expecting when I looked for the resolution of this issue. Dec 15, 2015 at 21:45
  • 2
    Is there a way to specify the name for such a foreign key column? I already had situations where there were multiple references within the same record to a specific data table. That means I would expect to see (sourceClass, targetClass, fieldName), but the example above only seems to contain (sourceClass, targetClass). Has anyone some information about this?
    – Regis May
    Mar 29, 2016 at 23:54
  • A key part of foreign key constraints is the "ON DELETE" clause. In Rails 7, as far as I can see, you can not specify the ON DELETE clause with add_reference or belongs_to but you can with add_foreign_key.
    – pedz
    Apr 9 at 4:13
36

First of all when you use belongs_to method don't use s at the end of the word: business_hours belongs_to business which belongs_to user.

Now create a migration:

rails generate migration migration_name

And in migration add columns:

class MigrationName < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    add_foreign_key :business_hours, :businesses
    add_foreign_key :businesses, :users
  end
end

Run rake db:migrate. That's it.

6
  • 1
    Should I also add the business_id column to businesses and the user_id column to users if they don't already have them?
    – user470763
    Apr 27, 2013 at 21:55
  • Ok. When I run db:migrate I get this error: PG::Error: ERROR: relation "business" does not exist
    – user470763
    Apr 27, 2013 at 22:06
  • Sorry, found my error in the def change method. Thanks for your help!
    – user470763
    Apr 27, 2013 at 22:09
  • 9
    How does this create an FK in the DB? Won't this just create a column named XXX_id? Will it enforce relational integrity?
    – Jo.P
    Jun 22, 2015 at 21:18
  • Remember to add an index on any foreign key you create or generate. You can either use t.belongs_to :<parent>, index: true in the create table migration, or add the index manually afterward. Aug 16, 2015 at 15:48
12

Rails 5 now can add foreign key in migrations, see http://devdocs.io/rails~5.0/activerecord/connectionadapters/schemastatements#method-i-add_foreign_key. So

 add_foreign_key :articles, :authors

creates

 ALTER TABLE "articles" ADD CONSTRAINT fk_rails_e74ce85cbc FOREIGN KEY ("author_id") REFERENCES "authors" ("id")

If you have a non standard data model you can do.

 add_foreign_key :articles, :users, column: :author_id, primary_key: "lng_id"

which creates

 ALTER TABLE "articles" ADD CONSTRAINT fk_rails_58ca3d3a82 FOREIGN KEY ("author_id") REFERENCES "users" ("lng_id")
0
7

I haven't tried it with PostgreSQL but at least with MySQL Rails do NOT create foreign keys, I mean not real db-level foreign keys. All they create is an integer that is named according to the convention. That means that out of the box you do not get the index on this fake foreign key(for faster lookup) and there is also no db-level referential integrity check. To get that you need to do something like:

ALTER TABLE your_table ADD CONSTRAINT fk_whatever_you_want_to_name_it FOREIGN KEY   (foreign_key_name) REFERENCES another_table(its_primary_key)

In a Rails migration you can pass this as a string argument to the "execute" function. Adding a "real" foreign key also automatically creates an index. At least for me this was a rather nasty surprise.

6
  • This is news to me. I wish someone else would comment on it, as this would indeed be a rather nasty surprise. I use Postgres and looking at the tables in pgAdmin they are NOT listed as foreign keys either. This might be ok for a Rails only project, but what if I need other programs to access the database?
    – tentimes
    Dec 4, 2013 at 14:39
  • It is a little nasty, but I learned there is also reason behind it. Rails are trying to abstract away from the db as much as possible so that you can easily switch the persistence layer. But I think it's something that is not sufficiently stressed. If you want you can always use add_index on the fields that you want as foreign keys. Or you can write your migrations in SQL or perhaps even force rails to do the foreign keys somehow. But the thing is you won't even look for a way to do it if you don't know rails is not doing itin the first place. Does that actually make sense? :-)
    – Renra
    Dec 5, 2013 at 9:29
  • Actually I found out that there is a gem called Foreigner to correct this! It also has an add-on gem called Immigrant that works for your whole db. Adding an index marks something as a foreign key? I didn't know that - I am new to rails ;)
    – tentimes
    Dec 5, 2013 at 9:59
  • Cool. I'm not sure it does that either. You'd have to check. But it makes the lookup faster just like it would be with a real foreign key. It probably does not check integrity though. And I'm not sure about uniqueness.
    – Renra
    Dec 5, 2013 at 10:08
  • One other advantage of not using db-level foreign keys that I have realized recently is rolling back migrations. If you have many migrations and you realize you want to roll back one that is in the middle, you can do that without rolling back the older ones (which might depend on it via foreign keys). With real foreign keys you'd have to migrate down everything until you reached the one migration you want, tweak it and then migrate everything up again.
    – Renra
    Jul 4, 2014 at 18:17

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