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I hear a lot about what JVM JITs can do, but don't see a lot of information on how to profile what the JIT is actually doing in a given run of your program. There are lots of tips about using -XX:+PrintCompilation and -XX:+PrintOptoAssembly but it results in really low-level information that is hard to interpret.

In general, during optimization, I like to have a benchmark suite of common operations with dedicated JIT warmup time and so on, but I'd like to be able to see which optimizations are actually firing on my code. Perhaps my JVM considered inlining a particular method call but something about it made it decide not to, or perhaps the JIT was unable to avoid array bounds checks in my loops because I phrased my invariants and looping conditions too obscurely. I'd expect a tool like YourKit to support some form of "what is going on with the JIT" but I haven't been able to find support for that in YourKit or anywhere else.

Ideally I'd just like a brain dump of what the JIT's optimizer is thinking during a run of my program. Say I've warmed up my function plenty and it decided to inline three methods into my inner loop and broke the loop up into three sections with no array bounds checks on the middle section, I'd like a summary of those decisions and the motivation for them.

Am I missing something obvious here? What do JVM performance-aware programmers do when optimizing tight inner loops to figure out what is going on? Surely the low-level -XX flags can't be the only option, can they? I'd appreciate hints on how best to deal with this sort of low-level stuff on the JVM. And no, this question is not motivated by premature optimization! :)

Edit: I guess some of what I want is given by -XX:+LogCompilation but I'm still curious if people have general tips and tools for this kind of activity.

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This talk may give you some information on how to visualize JVM internals: infoq.com/presentations/Visualizing-Java-GC –  sschaef Apr 28 '13 at 2:29

1 Answer 1

If you want a brain dump, you can print the resulting assembly code, but this is much lower level than what you have already. I suspect what you are looking for doesn't exist for the HotSpot JVM. I saw a presentation for something like this based on JRockit and perhaps this will make it into HotSpot one day.

Am I missing something obvious here? What do JVM performance-aware programmers do when optimizing tight inner loops to figure out what is going on?

Usually, I like to minimise garbage production and this usually performs well enough. e.g for micro-seconds latencies.

This sort of micro-optimisation really requires a deep understand of machine code and how CPUs really work.

Surely the low-level -XX flags can't be the only option, can they?

If only it where that simple, it is far more complicated. To dump the machine code you need an additional native library which doesn't ship with the JVM. ;)

I'd appreciate hints on how best to deal with this sort of low-level stuff on the JVM.

It appears you don't really want to work at the low level if you can avoid it and I believe this is a good thing, you have to take care of the high level first because micro-optimisation is good for micro-benchmarks but rarely good for real applications because you need to understand all the latencies of your end to end system and this you can do without even looking at the code in many cases. i.e. is the main delay in your database, OS, disk, or network IO.

I'm still curious if people have general tips and tools for this kind of activity.

Use a profiler, and if you suspect you need to go lower, it is quite likely you have missed something far more important.

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Adding the right libraries is actually all you need on Hotspot to get the machinecode. No need for debug builds of the JVM, the default binaries work all right. –  Voo Apr 28 '13 at 19:19
    
@Voo It has been a while since I did this. Thank you for the correction. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 28 '13 at 19:21
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I don't think it's necessarily likely to have missed something far more important. I'm primarily interested in how higher-level languages like e.g., Scala, play with the JVM's existing optimizations. In particular, I'm frustrated that the only way to get reasonably tight performance out of Scala (lots of number crunching for a user-facing feature, so raw speed matters) is to drop down to while loops and the like. To improve it, I want to experiment with and design better Scala abstractions that nonetheless work well with the JIT, and to do that, a good JIT diagnostic tool is helpful. –  Mysterious Dan Nov 14 '13 at 13:41
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For what it's worth, I already do have a lot of the deep understanding of machine code and how CPUs work that you mention above, and already avoid garbage production as much as possible. I'm really just trying to write high-performance reusable abstractions and to do that well, need to understand what my compiler is doing to them at runtime, and whether for example it can see through my Scala HOFs to eliminate array bounds checks. –  Mysterious Dan Nov 14 '13 at 13:45

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