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In TCP 3-way handshake, 3 segments will be sent (SYN, SYN ACK, ACK). What if the third segment(ACK) is lost? Is the sender going to resend the segment or give up establishing the connection? And how do the two hosts know the segment is lost?

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TCP has a sequence number in all packets. Hence it's easy to know if a packet was lost or not. If a host doesn't get an ACK on a packet he just resends it.

In most cases though, even if that ACK was lost, there will be no resending for a very simple reason. Directly after the ACK, the host that opened the TCP protocol is likely to start sending data. That data will, as all TCP packets, have an ACK number, so the recipient would get an ACK that way. Hence, the sender of the SYN-ACK should reasonably not care that it didn't get the ACK, because it gets an "implicit" ACK in the following package.

The re-send of the SYN-ACK is only necessary of there no data is received at all.

Update: I found the place in the RFC that specified exactly this:

If our SYN has been acknowledged (perhaps in this incoming segment) the precedence level of the incoming segment must match the local precedence level exactly, if it does not a reset must be sent.

In other words, if the ACK is dropped but the next packet is not dropped, then everything is fine. Otherwise, the connection must be reset. Which makes perfect sense.

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    The final ACK of the handshake is not itself ACK'ed, though. Apr 28 '13 at 5:09
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    ACKing an ACK would make transmission of actual data impossible. Apr 28 '13 at 5:12
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I am not an expert on this particular situation, but I suspect what will happen is the client will think it is connected but the server will not. If the client tries to send data to the server, the server will reject it and send a RST packet to the client so it can reset its "connection".

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  • The server sees the connection as established when sending the SYN-ACK. But this may be an implementation detail, I haven't found the actual specifications for what to do in this case. Maybe there aren't any. Apr 28 '13 at 5:13
  • @LennartRegebro: according to RFC 793 Section 3.4, the server does not enter the ESTABLISHED state until it receives the final ACK. When it sends the SYN+ACK, it is still in the SYN-RECEIVED state. The client enters the ESTABLISHED state when it receives the SYN+ACK. Apr 28 '13 at 5:16
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    Found it: "If our SYN has been acknowledged (perhaps in this incoming segment) the precedence level of the incoming segment must match the local precedence level exactly, if it does not a reset must be sent." In other words, if the ACK and only the ACK is dropped, the connection becomes established. If more things are dropped, there is a reset. " Apr 28 '13 at 5:22

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