I need to rotate an image by either 90, 180 or 270 degrees. In OpenCV4Android I can use:

Imgproc.getRotationMatrix2D(new Point(center, center), degrees, 1);
Imgproc.warpAffine(src, dst, rotationMatrix, dst.size());

However, this is a huge bottleneck in my image processing algorithm. Of course, a simple rotation by a multiple of 90 degrees is much simpler than the most general case of warpAffine, and can be done much more efficiently. For 180 degrees, for instance, I could use:

Core.flip(src, dst, -1);

where -1 means to flip about both horizontal and vertical axes. Is there a similar optimization I could use for 90 or 270 degree rotations?

  • have you concluded the java solution , can you post the same – Abhishek Choudhary Oct 9 '13 at 17:42
  • both Core.rotate(mRgba, mRgba, Core.ROTATE_180); & Core.flip(mRgba, mRgba, -1); will eat about ~12-14 ms CPU on my Xiaomi Redmi 4 Prime. very bad performance. I wanted to inverse camera byte frames but it's too much – user924 May 3 at 7:03
up vote 7 down vote accepted

This is the first result when you Google it and none of these solutions really answer the question or is correct or succinct.

Core.rotate(Mat src, Mat dst, Core.ROTATE_90_CLOCKWISE); //ROTATE_180 or ROTATE_90_COUNTERCLOCKWISE
  • Wow, a re-assigned answer! – Tom Aug 8 at 4:10

I don't know the java api very well, this codes are developed by c++. The logics should be the same, use transpose + flip to rotate the image with 90n(n belongs to N = -minimum value of int, ....., -3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, ..., max value of int)

/*
 *@brief rotate image by multiple of 90 degrees
 *
 *@param source : input image
 *@param dst : output image
 *@param angle : factor of 90, even it is not factor of 90, the angle
 * will be mapped to the range of [-360, 360].
 * {angle = 90n; n = {-4, -3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, 3, 4} }
 * if angle bigger than 360 or smaller than -360, the angle will
 * be map to -360 ~ 360.
 * mapping rule is : angle = ((angle / 90) % 4) * 90;
 *
 * ex : 89 will map to 0, 98 to 90, 179 to 90, 270 to 3, 360 to 0.
 *
 */
void rotate_image_90n(cv::Mat &src, cv::Mat &dst, int angle)
{   
   if(src.data != dst.data){
       src.copyTo(dst);
   }

   angle = ((angle / 90) % 4) * 90;

   //0 : flip vertical; 1 flip horizontal
   bool const flip_horizontal_or_vertical = angle > 0 ? 1 : 0;
   int const number = std::abs(angle / 90);          

   for(int i = 0; i != number; ++i){
       cv::transpose(dst, dst);
       cv::flip(dst, dst, flip_horizontal_or_vertical);
   }
}

Edit : Improve performance, thanks for the comments of TimZaman and the implementation of 1''

void rotate_90n(cv::Mat const &src, cv::Mat &dst, int angle)
{        
     CV_Assert(angle % 90 == 0 && angle <= 360 && angle >= -360);
     if(angle == 270 || angle == -90){
        // Rotate clockwise 270 degrees
        cv::transpose(src, dst);
        cv::flip(dst, dst, 0);
    }else if(angle == 180 || angle == -180){
        // Rotate clockwise 180 degrees
        cv::flip(src, dst, -1);
    }else if(angle == 90 || angle == -270){
        // Rotate clockwise 90 degrees
        cv::transpose(src, dst);
        cv::flip(dst, dst, 1);
    }else if(angle == 360 || angle == 0 || angle == -360){
        if(src.data != dst.data){
            src.copyTo(dst);
        }
    }
}
  • 2
    Your loop makes it more expensive than necessary mate. – TimZaman May 23 '15 at 9:49
  • I am not fond of the temporary image created by src.t(): it causes every time an allocation which could be expensive especially in Android – Antonio Feb 16 '16 at 12:20
  • @Antonio The create function will only allocate new buffer when needed. In other words, it would not allocate anything if the dimensions and type of the dst same as src – StereoMatching Feb 16 '16 at 14:15
  • Sure, but I am speaking about the matrix created when calling src.t() – Antonio Feb 16 '16 at 14:26
  • @Antonio Thanks for pointing out src.t(), I use transpose to replace it, now it would not allocate new buffer if the dst and src have same size and type – StereoMatching Feb 16 '16 at 15:49

This will rotate an image any number of degrees, using the most efficient means for multiples of 90.

    void
    rotate_cw(const cv::Mat& image, cv::Mat& dest, int degrees)
    {
        switch (degrees % 360) {
            case 0:
                dest = image.clone();
                break;
            case 90:
                cv::flip(image.t(), dest, 1);
                break;
            case 180:
                cv::flip(image, dest, -1);
                break;
            case 270:
                cv::flip(image.t(), dest, 0);
                break;
            default:
                cv::Mat r = cv::getRotationMatrix2D({image.cols/2.0F, image.rows/2.0F}, degrees, 1.0);
                int len = std::max(image.cols, image.rows);
                cv::warpAffine(image, dest, r, cv::Size(len, len));
                break; //image size will change
        }
    }

But with opencv 3.0, this is done by just via the cv::rotate command:

cv::rotate(image, dest, e.g. cv::ROTATE_90_COUNTERCLOCKWISE);
  • Usually the output image should be passed as parameter, otherwise allocation will happen at each call. (With your implementation you have only an advantage in the case of rotation = 0) – Antonio Feb 17 '16 at 10:34
  • Pff this code is dangerous. You are returning the same underlying data as is passed in image, unless the rotation is default. Moreover, the canvas generated is too big due to cv::Size(len, len). – TimZaman Aug 22 '16 at 9:24
  • thanks a lot! I edited and ported your first solution [0,90,180,270] for android where I had an OpenCV app and I could show the JavaCameraView in the right way. Have a good day! – Antonino Jul 19 '17 at 2:53

Here is a solution using the Android API. Here, I am using it to rotate images from a camera which could be mounted in various orientations.

if (mCameraOrientation == 270) {
    // Rotate clockwise 270 degrees
    Core.flip(src.t(), dst, 0);
} else if (mCameraOrientation == 180) {
    // Rotate clockwise 180 degrees
    Core.flip(src, dst, -1);
} else if (mCameraOrientation == 90) {
    // Rotate clockwise 90 degrees
    Core.flip(src.t(), dst, 1);
} else if (mCameraOrientation == 0) {
    // No rotation
    dst = src;
}

Here is my Python translation (and thanks to all the posters):

import cv2
def rot90(img, rotflag):
    """ rotFlag 1=CW, 2=CCW, 3=180"""
    if rotflag == 1:
        img = cv2.transpose(img)  
        img = cv2.flip(img, 1)  # transpose+flip(1)=CW
    elif rotflag == 2:
        img = cv2.transpose(img)  
        img = cv2.flip(img, 0)  # transpose+flip(0)=CCW
    elif rotflag ==3:
        img = cv2.flip(img, -1)  # transpose+flip(-1)=180
    elif rotflag != 0:  # if not 0,1,2,3
        raise Exception("Unknown rotation flag({})".format(rotflag))
    return img

I wrote this Python version using Numpy only, which are much faster than using cv2.transpose() and cv2.flip().

def rotate_image_90(im, angle):
    if angle % 90 == 0:
        angle = angle % 360
        if angle == 0:
            return im
        elif angle == 90:
            return im.transpose((1,0, 2))[:,::-1,:]
        elif angle == 180:
            return im[::-1,::-1,:]
        elif angle == 270:
            return im.transpose((1,0, 2))[::-1,:,:]

    else:
        raise Exception('Error')

You can rotate image using numpy rot90 function

like

def rotate_image(image,deg):
    if deg ==90:
        return np.rot90(image)
    if deg ==180:
        return np.rot90(image,2)
    if deg == 270:
        return np.rot90(image,-1) #Reverse 90 deg rotation

Hope this help ..

Use the numpy.rot90,if you want 180 degrees,just do it twice.

import numpy as np
import cv2

img = cv2.imread('img.png',1)
cv2.imshow('',img)
cv2.waitKey(0)

img90 = np.rot90(img)
cv2.imshow('',img90)
cv2.waitKey(0)

In python:

# import the necessary packages
import numpy as np
import cv2

# initialize the camera and grab a reference to the raw camera capture
vs = cv2.VideoCapture(0)
(ret, image_original) = vs.read()
image_rotated_90 = np.rot90(image_original)
image_rotated_180 = np.rot90(image_rotated_90)

# show the frame and press any key to quit the image frame
cv2.imshow("Frame", image_rotated_180)
cv2.waitKey(0)

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