61

I need to find out if matrix is positive definite. My matrix is numpy matrix. I was expecting to find any related method in numpy library, but no success. I appreciate any help.

77

You can also check if all the eigenvalues of matrix are positive, if so the matrix is positive definite:

import numpy as np

def is_pos_def(x):
    return np.all(np.linalg.eigvals(x) > 0)
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  • 2
    You could use np.linalg.eigvals instead, which only computes the eigenvalues. Even then, it's much slower than @NPE's approach (3x for 10x10 matrices, 40x for 1000x1000). – jorgeca Apr 29 '13 at 10:09
  • 19
    <pedantic>It is not true in general that all positive eigenvalues implies positive definiteness, unless you know that the matrix is symmetric (real case) or Hermitian (complex case). For example, A = array([[1, -100],[0, 2]]) is not positive definite. Some might include symmetric or Hermitian as part of the definition of "positive definite", but that is not universal.</pedantic> – Warren Weckesser Apr 29 '13 at 20:05
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    @WarrenWeckesser Oops, that's right, not pedantic! In fact, checking symmetry is also needed if using np.linalg.cholesky (it doesn't check it and may return a wrong result, as your example also shows). I wonder how checking whether a non symmetric matrix is positive definite can be done numerically... – jorgeca May 2 '13 at 23:34
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    You can do np.all(x-x.T==0) to check for symmetry – shinjin Jan 31 '14 at 0:04
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    This is terribly inefficient! For matrices larger than about 6 or 7 rows/columns, use cholesky as pointed out by NPE below. The cholesky route feels less convenient (catching an exception etc) but it is much less wasteful. – Alex Flint Mar 31 '14 at 17:29
66

You could try computing Cholesky decomposition (numpy.linalg.cholesky). This will raise LinAlgError if the matrix is not positive definite.

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  • 8
    This should be substantially more efficient than the eigenvalue solution. – MRocklin Jul 22 '13 at 16:18
  • Just a note that in the positive semi-definite case, numerically speaking, one can also add a little identity to the matrix (thus shifting all eigenvalues a small amount e.g. a few times machine precision) then use the cholesky method as usual. – jawknee Jan 9 '18 at 17:19
24

There seems to be a small confusion in all of the answers above (at least concerning the question).

For real matrices, the tests for positive eigenvalues and positive-leading terms in np.linalg.cholesky only applies if the matrix is symmetric. So first one needs to test if the matrix is symmetric and then apply one of those methods (positive eigenvalues or Cholesky decomposition).

For example:

import numpy as np

#A nonsymmetric matrix
A = np.array([[9,7],[6,14]])

#check that all eigenvalues are positive:
np.all(np.linalg.eigvals(A) > 0)

#take a 'Cholesky' decomposition:
chol_A = np.linalg.cholesky(A)

The matrix A is not symmetric, but the eigenvalues are positive and Numpy returns a Cholesky decomposition that is wrong. You can check that:

chol_A.dot(chol_A.T)

is different than A.

You can also check that all the python functions above would test positive for 'positive-definiteness'. This could potentially be a serious problem if you were trying to use the Cholesky decomposition to compute the inverse, since:

>np.linalg.inv(A)
array([[ 0.16666667, -0.08333333],
   [-0.07142857,  0.10714286]])

>np.linalg.inv(chol_A.T).dot(np.linalg.inv(chol_A))
array([[ 0.15555556, -0.06666667],
   [-0.06666667,  0.1       ]])

are different.

In summary, I would suggest adding a line to any of the functions above to check if the matrix is symmetric, for example:

def is_pos_def(A):
    if np.array_equal(A, A.T):
        try:
            np.linalg.cholesky(A)
            return True
        except np.linalg.LinAlgError:
            return False
    else:
        return False

You may want to replace np.array_equal(A, A.T) in the function above for np.allclose(A, A.T) to avoid differences that are due to floating point errors.

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  • 1
    Nitpick: you should probably check for numpy.linalg.LinAlgError unless you import it with from numpy.linalg import LinAlgError, which isn't a thing I would want to do if I would only catch this specific exception once or twice in my code. – Imperishable Night Jul 17 '18 at 15:32
  • If working with complex matrices, this might lead to error (namely if A is complex positive definite, hence hermitian with strictly positive eigenvalues, the cholesky trick is still correct but it will not pass the first if statement for np.allclose(A, A.T)). Using np.allclose(A, A.H) will fix this (the OP says he is working with numpy matrix, if working with ndarray, use A.conj().T instead of .H – H. Rev. Feb 8 '19 at 13:22
4

I don't know why the solution of NPE is so underrated. It's the best way to do this. I've found on Wkipedia that the complexity is cubic.

Furthermore, there it is said that it's more numerically stable than the Lu decomposition. And the Lu decomposition is more stable than the method of finding all the eigenvalues.

And, it is a very elegant solution, because it's a fact :

A matrix has a Cholesky decomposition if and only if it is symmetric positive.

So why not using maths ? Maybe some people are affraid of the raise of the exception, but it'a fact too, it's quite useful to program with exceptions.

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  • 3
    From the same Wikipedia page, it seems like your statement is wrong. The page says " If the matrix A is Hermitian and positive semi-definite, then it still has a decomposition of the form A = LL* if the diagonal entries of L are allowed to be zero.[3]" Thus a matrix with a Cholesky decomposition does not imply the matrix is symmetric positive definite since it could just be semi-definite. Am I interpreting this wrong? Also, it seems like you've just thrown "symmetric" across the implication. i.e. shouldn't it be every Hermitian positive-definite matrix has unique Cholesky decomposition? – user3731622 May 20 '16 at 18:23
4

To illustrate @NPE's answer with some ready-to-use code:

import numpy as np

def is_pd(K):
    try:
        np.linalg.cholesky(K)
        return 1 
    except np.linalg.linalg.LinAlgError as err:
        if 'Matrix is not positive definite' in err.message:
            return 0
        else:
            raise 
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2

For a real matrix $A$, we have $x^TAx=\frac{1}{2}(x^T(A+A^T)x)$, and $A+A^T$ is symmetric real matrix. So $A$ is positive definite iff $A+A^T$ is positive definite, iff all the eigenvalues of $A+A^T$ are positive.

import numpy as np

def is_pos_def(A):
    M = np.matrix(A)
    return np.all(np.linalg.eigvals(M+M.transpose()) > 0)
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  • This is the only answer properly answering the question by OP : "how to determine if a matrix is DP". All the other answers confusingly make the assumption that symmetry is needed for a matrix to be definite positive, which is not the case. – Guillaume Garrigos Apr 26 at 11:09
2

If you specifically want symmetric (hermitian, if complex) positive SEMI-definite matrices than the below will do. If you don't care about symmetry (hermitian, if complex) remove the 'if' state that checks for it. If you want positive definite rather than positive SEMI-definite than remove the regularization line (and change the value passed to 'np.lingalg.cholesky()' from 'regularized_X' to 'X'). The below

import numpy as np

def is_hermitian_positive_semidefinite(X):
    if X.shape[0] != X.shape[1]: # must be a square matrix
        return False

    if not np.all( X - X.H == 0 ): # must be a symmetric or hermitian matrix
        return False

    try: # Cholesky decomposition fails for matrices that are NOT positive definite.

        # But since the matrix may be positive SEMI-definite due to rank deficiency
        # we must regularize.
        regularized_X = X + np.eye(X.shape[0]) * 1e-14

        np.linalg.cholesky(regularized_X)
    except np.linalg.LinAlgError:
        return False

    return True
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  • Does it work for complex matrixes? – DeepRazi Oct 11 at 21:17
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    @DeepRazi Numpy's Cholesky decomposition implementation works on complex numbers (i.e. complex np.dtype). So yes it works in that sense. But my code above originally checked if the transpose rather than the conjugate-transpose is equal to itself which makes the overall function invalid for complex numbers. I have now change the transpose to conjugate-transpose and it is now valid for complex numbers. – CognizantApe Oct 14 at 19:41
1

For Not symmetric Matrix you can use the Principal Minor Test :

This is a schema of what we learned in class

def isPD(Y):
  row = X.shape [0]
  i = 0
  j = 0
  for i in range(row+1) : 
    Step = Y[:i,:j]
    j+=1
    i+=1
    det = np.linalg.det(Step)
    if det > 0 : 
        continue 
    else :
        return ("Not Positive Definite, Test Principal minor failed")

  return ("Positive Definite")
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New contributor
Pietro Bonazzi is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering. Check out our Code of Conduct.
0

For Not symmetric Matrix you can use the Principal Minor Test :

This is a schema of what we learned in class

def isPD(Y):
  row = X.shape [0]
  i = 0
  j = 0
  for i in range(row+1) : 
    Step = Y[:i,:j]
    j+=1
    i+=1
    det = np.linalg.det(Step)
    if det < 0 : 
        return ("Not Positive Definite, Test Principal minor failed")

  return ("Positive Definite")
| improve this answer | |
New contributor
Pietro Bonazzi is a new contributor to this site. Take care in asking for clarification, commenting, and answering. Check out our Code of Conduct.

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