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For the context of a soft real time system that should not pause for more than 200ms, We're looking for a way to have an advance warning before a Full GC is imminent. We realize we might not be able to avoid it, but we'd like to fail over to another node before the system stalls.

We've been able to come up with a scheme that will provide us with an advance warning, ahead of imminent full GC that may cause the system to stall for several seconds (which we need to avoid).

What we've been able to come up with relies on CMS free list statistics: -XX:PrintFLSStatistics=1. This prints free list statistics into the GC log after every GC cycle, including young GC, so the information is available at short intervals, and will appear even more frequently during intervals of high memory allocation rate. It probably costs a little in terms of performance, but our working assumption is that we can afford it.

The output to the log looks like so:

Statistics for BinaryTreeDictionary:
------------------------------------
Total Free Space: 382153298
Max   Chunk Size: 382064598
Number of Blocks: 28
Av.  Block  Size: 13648332
Tree      Height: 8

In particular, the maximum free chunk size is 382064598 words. With 64-bit words this should amount to just below 2915MB. This number has been decreasing very slowly, at a rate of roughly 1MB per hour.

It is our understanding that so long as the maximum free chunk size is larger than the young generation (assuming no humungous object allocation), every object promotion should succeed.

Recently, we've run a several-days-long stress tests, and have been seeing that CMS was able to maintain maximum chunk sizes upward of 94% of total old region space. The maximum free chunk size appears to be decreasing at a rate of less than 1MB/hour, which should be fine -- according to this we won't be hitting full GC any time soon, and the servers will likely be down for maintenance more frequently than full GC can occur.

In a previous test, at a time when the system was less memory efficient, we've been able to run the system for a good 10 hours. During the first hour, the maximum free chunk size has decreased to 100MB, where it stayed for over 8 hours. During the last 40 minutes of the run, the maximum free chunk size has decreased at a steady rate towards 0, when a full GC occurred -- this was very encouraging, because for that workload we seemed to be able to get a 40 minute advance warning (when the chunk size started a steady decline towards 0).

My question to you: assuming this all reflects a prolonged peak workload (workload at any given point in time in production will only be lower), does this sound like a valid approach? To what degree of reliability do you reckon we should be able to count on the maximum free chunk size statistic from the GC log?

We are definitely open for suggestions, but request that they be limited to solutions available on HotSpot (No Azul for us, at least for now). Also, G1 by itself is no solution unless we can come up with a similar metric that will give us advance warning before Full GCs, or any GCs that significantly exceed our SLA (and these can occasionally occur).

  • Is it feasible for you to test JRockit Deterministic GC? docs.oracle.com/cd/E15289_01/doc.40/e15071/intro.htm#i1010645 – fglez Apr 29 '13 at 13:42
  • We are aware of it, as well as IBM's and Oracle's other real time offerings. It is important for us to have some weaker guarantees (or even just heuristics) that enable us to deploy on HotSpot as well. – nadavwr Apr 29 '13 at 15:42
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    Have you considered forcing periodic full GCs on alternating nodes? This would allow more predictable behaviour. CMS is not predictable in the long term as fragmentation grows. – fglez Apr 29 '13 at 15:43
  • @fglez This appears to be our best bet, but we want a metric we can monitor to go below critical threshold before we failover and initiate GC, instead of doing this at regular intervals. Maximum free chunk size (available through GC log, as shown above) seems to be the perfect match, since it will decrease as fragmentation increases. We're looking for feedback over this. This is kind of unorthodox, so even a comment like "I'm familiar with CMS and this seems logical to me" will be helpful :-) – nadavwr Apr 29 '13 at 18:30
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    @danLeon Concurrent Mark & Sweep, a mostly-low-latency garbage collector for Sun/Oracle's HotSpot JVM. – nadavwr Apr 29 '13 at 18:47
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I post here relevant excerpts from a very enlightening and encouraging answer by Jon Masamitsu from Oracle, which I got from the HotSpot GC mailing list (hotspot-gc-use@openjdk.java.net) -- he works on HotSpot, so this is very good news indeed.

At any rate, the question remains open for now (I can't credit myself for quoting an email :-) ), so please add your suggestions!

Formatting: quotes from the original post are more heavily indented than Jon's response.

It is our understanding that so long as the maximum free chunk size is larger than the young generation (assuming no humungous object allocation), every object promotion should succeed.

To a very large degree this is correct. There are circumstances under which an object promoted from the young generation into the CMS generation will require more space in the CMS generation than it did in the young generation. I don't think this happens to a significant extent.

The above is very encouraging, since we can definitely dedicate some spare memory to protect against the rare cases he describes, and it sounds like we'd be doing fine otherwise.

<--snip-->

My question to you: assuming this all reflects a prolonged peak workload (workload at any given point in time in production will only be lower), does this sound like a valid approach? To what degree of reliability do you reckon we should be able to count on the maximum free chunk size statistic from the GC log?

The maximum free chunk size is exact at the time GC prints it, but it can be stale by the time you read it and make your decisions.

For our workloads, this metric is on a very slow downward spiral, so a little staleness won't hurt us.

<--snip-->

We are definitely open for suggestions, but request that they be limited to solutions available on HotSpot (No Azul for us, at least for now). Also, G1 by itself is no solution unless we can come up with a similar metric that will give us advance warning before Full GCs, or any GCs that significantly exceed our SLA (and these can occasionally occur).

I think that the use of maximum free chunk size as your metric is a good choice. It is very conservative (which sounds like what you want) and not subject to odd mixtures of object sizes.

For G1 I think you could use the number of completely free regions. I don't know if it is printed in any of the logs currently but it is probably a metric we maintain (or could easily). If the number of completely free regions decreases over time, it could signal that a full GC is coming.

Jon

Thank you Jon!

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Divide and Conquer!

Your system use a lot of memory, and need to be high responsive. So redesign the architecture of your system, to achieve booth.

Identify the critical real time task and with their business rules to create a java process for it. And used any non conventional programing practice on it, the idea is do not depends of the GC to keep clean the memory. Think about it, and be creative.

Now create others layers and processes, to handle the rest, and build the pipe code to connect everything.

And even you can schedule the life of the real time process, or check their response time, to kill it and create a new fresh one. But I can expect that you will do not need to kill it, to keep it high response.

Good luck!

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