9

Is it possible to return a custom auth response? I already have my own custom authentication provider that inherits from CredentialsAuthProvider.

I want to return the session expiry date in the response, so that the client knows exactly when their server session will expire:

{
    "sessionId": "bG27SdxbRkqJqU6xv/gvBw==",
    "userName": "[email protected]",
    "sessionExpires": "2013-04-29T03:27:14.0000000",
    "responseStatus": {}
}

I can override the Authenticate method like so:

public override object Authenticate(IServiceBase authService, IAuthSession session, Auth request)
{
    // get base response
    var response = base.Authenticate(authService, session, request);

    // grab the session
    var customSession = authService.GetSession() as CustomUserSession;

    // if response can be cast and customSession exists
    if (response is AuthResponse && customSession != null)
    {
        // cast
        var authResponse = response as AuthResponse;

        // build custom response
        var customAuthResponse = new CustomAuthResponse
            {
                ReferrerUrl = authResponse.ReferrerUrl,
                SessionExpiry = customSession.SessionExpires,
                SessionId = authResponse.SessionId,
                ResponseStatus = authResponse.ResponseStatus,
                UserName = authResponse.UserName
            };
        return customAuthResponse;
    }

    // return the standard response
    return response;
}

This works fine, except in the case where the session already is active. In that case, the AuthService Post method checks for a valid session and automatically returns a standard AuthResponse, and there is no obvious way to override it:

var alreadyAuthenticated = response == null;
response = response ?? new AuthResponse {
    UserName = session.UserAuthName,
    SessionId = session.Id,
    ReferrerUrl = referrerUrl,
};

Following Paaschpa's ideas below, the following forces re-auth to always be re-authenticated, but it seems like there could be risks involved in leaving multiple active sessions open:

public override bool IsAuthorized(IAuthSession session, IOAuthTokens tokens, Auth request = null)
{
    // force re-authentication. Not great, but no other obvious way to do this
    if (request != null)
    {
        return false; // auth or re-auth calls
    }

    return base.IsAuthorized(session, tokens, request);
}

Can anyone think of a better way to do this? I could implement my own AuthenticationService, but I'm not sure how I would override the AuthFeature?

2

1 Answer 1

4

If I understand correctly, you want to return a custom response after a user authenticates against '/auth/credentials'. Since you already have your own CredentialsAuthProvider I think you could just override Authenticate and return your own response.

Subclass of CredentialsAuthProvider

public class MyCredentialsAuthProvider : CredentialsAuthProvider
{
    public override object Authenticate(ServiceStack.ServiceInterface.IServiceBase authService, IAuthSession session, Auth request)
    {
        //let normal authentication happen
        var authResponse = (AuthResponse)base.Authenticate(authService, session, request);

        //return your own class, but take neccessary data from AuthResponse
        return new
            {
                UserName = authResponse.UserName,
                SessionId = authResponse.SessionId,
                ReferrerUrl = authResponse.ReferrerUrl,
                SessionExpires = DateTime.Now
            };

    }
}
4
  • I already pretty much have this running as you have it above. However, should you re-call /auth with the same credentials, whilst the session is still valid (i.e. not expired), then an AuthResponse is echoed back instead of a MyCustomAuthResponse. It appears that in that scenario, the Authenticate method is not reached. I think I would have to do this further up the chain. Maybe override Post().
    – Rebecca
    Commented May 2, 2013 at 9:06
  • hmmm...you could override IsAuthorized to always return false and add logic to your other overrides to handle the case of an already authorized/authenticated user session. Seems kind of risky, though.
    – paaschpa
    Commented May 2, 2013 at 15:55
  • Apart from creating multiple active sessions for the same user, can you think of any other risks?
    – Rebecca
    Commented May 7, 2013 at 9:29
  • Well...having multiple active sessions means you would lose data added to a user's Session that isn't in the new 'active session'. My main issue is it feels like 'tricking' the framework which usually means side effects and not being able to use features as intended.
    – paaschpa
    Commented May 8, 2013 at 14:54

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.