17

It makes sense to implement << for QString like:

std::ostream&  operator <<(std::ostream &stream,const QString &str)
{
   stream << str.toAscii().constData(); //or: stream << str.toStdString(); //??
   return stream;
}

instead of writing

stream << str.toAscii().constData();

every time in the code.

However, since it is not in standard Qt library, I'm assuming there is any particular reason not to do so. What are the risks/inconvenience of overloading << as specified above?

  • 1
    I don't see why it makes sense to use str.toAscii() instead of toLatin1() or toUtf8() or toLocal8Bit() ? – fjardon Apr 29 '13 at 14:35
  • @fjardon - there is no particular reason :) Any of the ones you mentioned I think would work to. – Ilya Kobelevskiy Apr 29 '13 at 14:38
  • 1
    They do very different things outside of 7-bit clean strings. – Yakk - Adam Nevraumont Apr 29 '13 at 14:39
  • 1
    I believe the reason it's not in Qt is that Qt is pretty much trying to replace the entire standard library with itself. Not that I like this philosophy of theirs, but they seem keen on it. – Angew is no longer proud of SO Apr 29 '13 at 14:40
  • 1
    @Ilya I mean: there can be only a single operator << for QString and ostream. And there is no reason to restrict the library users to only one implementation. So it should not be included in the library but let to each user initiative to write this operator. – fjardon Apr 29 '13 at 14:42
10

If the << operator is included in the Qt library every client of the library will have to use the exact same implementation. But due to the nature of QString it is far from obvious this is what these clients want. Some people writing software interacting with legacy file in western europe may want to use Latin1() characters, US people may go with Ascii() and more modern software may want to use Utf8().

Having a single implementation in the library would restrict unacceptably what can be done with the whole library.

| improve this answer | |
  • Thanks, I guess that makes sense - I take it as it is not the width of the bit that can't be figured out, but same bit width can be treated differently depending on the underlying text that QString represent. However, it is safe to provide own implementation for << knowing what character encoding maps to, right? – Ilya Kobelevskiy Apr 29 '13 at 15:06
  • Yes, if you know you will only deal with Ascii you can create your own operator. – fjardon Apr 29 '13 at 16:25
8

It's not necessary to implement such thing, as long as there exists a convenient solution like this one, involving QTextStream

QString s;
QTextStream out(&s);
out << "Text 1";
out << "Text 2";
out << "And so on....";

QTextStream is quite powerfull...

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    ...unless the interface you must work with requires a std::ostream of course. – boycy Oct 13 '17 at 9:09
  • 1
    There are something wrong in the provide source code. After do "QTextStream out(&s);" you can do out << "Text1" no s << "Text1" – Gustavo Rodríguez May 24 '18 at 9:38
1

I don't think there is any particular reason for excluding (nor including) this in the Qt library. Only problem that could possibly appear here is a possibility that std::ostream object could modify the contents of the parameter passed to std::ostream::operator<< function.

However, in the reference it is clearly stated that this function will modify the parameter if string buffer is passed - there is nothing about the other types, so I guess (and the common-sense is telling me) that operator<< will not modify char* parameter. Also, on this page there is nothing about modifying the passed object.

Last thing: instead of using QString::toAscii().constData(), you could use QString::toStdString() or qPrintable(const QString&) macro.

| improve this answer | |
1

The accepted answer points out some valid reasons for why there is no operator<< function for QString.

One can easily overcome those reasons by providing some convenience functions and maintaining some state in an application specific namespace.

#include <iostream>
#include <QString>

namespace MyApp
{
   typedef char const* (*QStringInsertFunction)(QString const& s);

   char const* use_toAscii(QString const& s)
   {
      return s.toAscii().constData();
   }

   char const* use_toUtf8(QString const& s)
   {
      return s.toUtf8().constData();
   }

   char const* use_toLatin1(QString const& s)
   {
      return s.toLatin1().constData();
   }

   // Default function to use to insert a QString.
   QStringInsertFunction insertFunction = use_toAscii;

   std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, QStringInsertFunction fun)
   {
      insertFunction = fun;
      return out;
   }

   std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& out, QString const& s)
   {
      return out << insertFunction(s);
   }
};

int main()
{
   using namespace MyApp;

   QString testQ("test-string");

   std::cout << use_toAscii << testQ << std::endl;
   std::cout << use_toUtf8 << testQ << std::endl;
   std::cout << use_toLatin1 << testQ << std::endl;

   return 0;
}

Output:

test-string
test-string
test-string
| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.