2

One of the exercises in this tutorial is:

Exploit the fact that map always returns an array: write a method hash_keys that accepts a hash and maps over it to return all the keys in a linear Array.

The solution is:

def hash_keys(hash)
    hash.map { |pair| pair.first }
end

However, I'm having trouble understanding why the above works. For example, I wrote a solution as follows that also works:

def hash_keys(hash)
    # Initialize a new array
    result = Array.new

    # Cycle through each element of the hash and push each key on to our array
    hash.map { |x,y| result.push(x) }

    # Return the array
    result
end

I can understand why my method works, but I don't understand their proposed solution. For example, they are not even creating an Array object. They are not returning anything. It seems they are just listing the first element in each key/value element array.

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4

I think you misunderstood the point of map. It doesn't just iterate over the given collection (that's what each is for) - it creates an array where each element is the result of calling the block with the corresponding element of the original collection.

Your solution could (and should) just as well be written using each instead of map as you aren't really making use of what map does - you're only making use of the fact that it invokes its block once for each element in the given collection.

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  • each would just return the hash. – Stefan Apr 29 '13 at 16:13
  • 1
    @Stefan There was an invalid edit of the question, really confusing matters. I rolled back most of that edit; now there's proper context for the answers. – Darshan Rivka Whittle Apr 29 '13 at 16:18
  • @Stefan No problem! I was really confused, too, until I went back and saw the original question. – Darshan Rivka Whittle Apr 30 '13 at 18:38
2

When map is applied to a hash, the hash is converted to an array. That is why explicit conversion into an array is not necessary. And map returns an array by replacing each item of the original array with the result of evaluating the block. Each time the block is evaluated, it will be given an array that is a pair of a key and its value. first applies to this pair and returns the key. map returns an array of these keys.

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1

map turns an Enumerable object into an Array. It's what it does. The block describes, in terms of each element in the receiver, what the corresponding element in the resulting array should be.

So, a simpler example is map on an Array:

[1,2,3,4].map {|n| n*2}
# => [2,4,6,8]

That is - from [1,2,3,4], generate a new Array, where each element is twice the equivalent entry in [1,2,3,4].

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1

Half of your answer is right in the question: "Exploit the fact that map always returns an array." You don't need to explicitly create an array because map does that for you.

As far as returning it, you already seem to know that the last line of a ruby method is its return value. In the tutorial's solution, since the hash creates an array at the last (and only line), the array is returned from the method.

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