I am new to the programming world. I was just writing this code in python to generate N prime numbers. User should input the value for N which is the total number of prime numbers to print out. I have written this code but it doesn't throw the desired output. Instead it prints the prime numbers till the Nth number. For eg.: User enters the value of N = 7. Desired output: 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 19 Actual output: 2, 3, 5, 7

Kindly advise.

i=1
x = int(input("Enter the number:"))
for k in range (1, (x+1), 1):
    c=0
    for j in range (1, (i+1), 1):
        a = i%j
        if (a==0):
            c = c+1

    if (c==2):
          print (i)
    else:
          k = k-1

    i=i+1

26 Answers 26

using a regexp :)

#!/usr/bin/python

import re, sys


def isPrime(n):
    # see http://www.noulakaz.net/weblog/2007/03/18/a-regular-expression-to-check-for-prime-numbers/
    return re.match(r'^1?$|^(11+?)\1+$', '1' * n) == None


N = int(sys.argv[1]) # number of primes wanted (from command-line)
M = 100              # upper-bound of search space
l = list()           # result list

while len(l) < N:
    l += filter(isPrime, range(M - 100, M)) # append prime element of [M - 100, M] to l
    M += 100                                # increment upper-bound

print l[:N] # print result list limited to N elements
  • +1 for regex , cool :) – Anurag Uniyal Oct 27 '09 at 9:24
  • really cool, I still don't understand very well how can it work, but +1 :) – dalloliogm Oct 27 '09 at 12:07
  • 4
    +1 Unefficient, but still fun ;) – gorsky Feb 6 '10 at 11:18
  • 8
    stupid and ingenious at once – wim Jan 18 '12 at 4:50

Super quick sieve implementation by David Eppstein - takes 0.146s for the first 1000 primes on my PC:

def gen_primes():
    """ Generate an infinite sequence of prime numbers.
    """
    # Maps composites to primes witnessing their compositeness.
    # This is memory efficient, as the sieve is not "run forward"
    # indefinitely, but only as long as required by the current
    # number being tested.
    #
    D = {}  

    # The running integer that's checked for primeness
    q = 2  

    while True:
        if q not in D:
            # q is a new prime.
            # Yield it and mark its first multiple that isn't
            # already marked in previous iterations
            # 
            yield q        
            D[q * q] = [q]
        else:
            # q is composite. D[q] is the list of primes that
            # divide it. Since we've reached q, we no longer
            # need it in the map, but we'll mark the next 
            # multiples of its witnesses to prepare for larger
            # numbers
            # 
            for p in D[q]:
                D.setdefault(p + q, []).append(p)
            del D[q]

        q += 1

primes = gen_primes()


x = set()
y = 0
a = gen_primes()
while y < 10000:
  x |= set([a.next()])
  y+=1

print "x contains {:,d} primes".format(len(x))
print "largest is {:,d}".format(sorted(x)[-1])

For reference, there's a pretty significant speed difference between the various stated solutions. Here is some comparison code. The solution pointed to by Lennart is called "historic", the one proposed by Ants is called "naive", and the one by RC is called "regexp."

from sys import argv
from time import time

def prime(i, primes):
    for prime in primes:
        if not (i == prime or i % prime):
            return False
    primes.add(i)
    return i

def historic(n):
    primes = set([2])
    i, p = 2, 0
    while True:
        if prime(i, primes):
            p += 1
            if p == n:
                return primes
        i += 1

def naive(n):
    from itertools import count, islice
    primes = (n for n in count(2) if all(n % d for d in range(2, n)))
    return islice(primes, 0, n)

def isPrime(n):
    import re
    # see http://tinyurl.com/3dbhjv
    return re.match(r'^1?$|^(11+?)\1+$', '1' * n) == None

def regexp(n):
    import sys
    N = int(sys.argv[1]) # number of primes wanted (from command-line)
    M = 100              # upper-bound of search space
    l = list()           # result list

    while len(l) < N:
        l += filter(isPrime, range(M - 100, M)) # append prime element of [M - 100, M] to l
        M += 100                                # increment upper-bound

    return l[:N] # print result list limited to N elements

def dotime(func, n):
    print func.__name__
    start = time()
    print sorted(list(func(n)))
    print 'Time in seconds: ' + str(time() - start)

if __name__ == "__main__":
    for func in naive, historic, regexp:
        dotime(func, int(argv[1]))

The output of this on my machine for n = 100 is:

naive
[2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 53, 59, 61, 67, 71, 73, 79, 83, 89, 97, 101, 103, 107, 109, 113, 127, 131, 137, 139, 149, 151, 157, 163, 167, 173, 179, 181, 191, 193, 197, 199, 211, 223, 227, 229, 233, 239, 241, 251, 257, 263, 269, 271, 277, 281, 283, 293, 307, 311, 313, 317, 331, 337, 347, 349, 353, 359, 367, 373, 379, 383, 389, 397, 401, 409, 419, 421, 431, 433, 439, 443, 449, 457, 461, 463, 467, 479, 487, 491, 499, 503, 509, 521, 523, 541]
Time in seconds: 0.0219371318817
historic
[2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 53, 59, 61, 67, 71, 73, 79, 83, 89, 97, 101, 103, 107, 109, 113, 127, 131, 137, 139, 149, 151, 157, 163, 167, 173, 179, 181, 191, 193, 197, 199, 211, 223, 227, 229, 233, 239, 241, 251, 257, 263, 269, 271, 277, 281, 283, 293, 307, 311, 313, 317, 331, 337, 347, 349, 353, 359, 367, 373, 379, 383, 389, 397, 401, 409, 419, 421, 431, 433, 439, 443, 449, 457, 461, 463, 467, 479, 487, 491, 499, 503, 509, 521, 523, 541]
Time in seconds: 0.00515413284302
regexp
[2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 53, 59, 61, 67, 71, 73, 79, 83, 89, 97, 101, 103, 107, 109, 113, 127, 131, 137, 139, 149, 151, 157, 163, 167, 173, 179, 181, 191, 193, 197, 199, 211, 223, 227, 229, 233, 239, 241, 251, 257, 263, 269, 271, 277, 281, 283, 293, 307, 311, 313, 317, 331, 337, 347, 349, 353, 359, 367, 373, 379, 383, 389, 397, 401, 409, 419, 421, 431, 433, 439, 443, 449, 457, 461, 463, 467, 479, 487, 491, 499, 503, 509, 521, 523, 541]
Time in seconds: 0.0733318328857

As you can see, there's a pretty big discrepancy. Here it is again for 1000 (prime outputs removed):

naive
Time in seconds: 1.49018788338
historic
Time in seconds: 0.148319005966
regexp
Time in seconds: 29.2350409031

The line k = k-1 does not do what you think. It has no effect. Changing k does not affect the loop. At each iteration, k is assigned to the next element of the range, so any changes you have made to k inside the loop will be overwritten.

  • I misread the initial question and was put off by how a was being used. This is an excellent hint that should lead the person in the right direction. – Omnifarious Oct 27 '09 at 6:31

Here's what I eventually came up with to print the first n primes:

numprimes = raw_input('How many primes to print?  ')
count = 0
potentialprime = 2

def primetest(potentialprime):
    divisor = 2
    while divisor <= potentialprime:
        if potentialprime == 2:
            return True
        elif potentialprime % divisor == 0:
            return False
            break
        while potentialprime % divisor != 0:
            if potentialprime - divisor > 1:
                divisor += 1
            else:
                return True

while count < int(numprimes):
    if primetest(potentialprime) == True:
        print 'Prime #' + str(count + 1), 'is', potentialprime
        count += 1
        potentialprime += 1
    else:
        potentialprime += 1
  • for a potential prime N, you test divide it by 2,3,4, ..., N-2,N-1. But do we really need to test whether 26 is divided by 20? or even 7?.. do we need to test any even number above 2, at all? – Will Ness Sep 19 '12 at 8:45
  • Not efficient, I know! – Tyler Seymour Sep 21 '12 at 3:05

What you need is a Prime Sieve (a fast type of algorithm for finding primes), a very simple one is Sieve of Eratosthenes (check wikipedia) and here is an implementation in PHP http://www.scriptol.com/programming/sieve.php

  • The sieve finds all primes below n, not the first n primes. – Brent Newey Oct 28 '09 at 15:55
  • 1
    @Brent Newey. Just use the prime number theorem to approximage the n-th prime number p_n . E.g. p_n < n ln(n) + n ln(n) ln(n) for n >6. – Accipitridae Mar 4 '10 at 20:13

What you want is something like this:

x = int(input("Enter the number:"))
count = 0
num = 2
while count < x:
     if isnumprime(x):
        print x
        count = count + 1
     num = num + 1

I'll leave it up to you to implement "isnumprime()". ;) Hint: You only need to test division with all previously found primenumbers.

Until we have N primes, take natural numbers one by one, check whether any of the so-far-collected-primes divide it.

If none does, "yay", we have a new prime...

that's it.

>>> def generate_n_primes(N):
...     primes  = []
...     chkthis = 2
...     while len(primes) < N:
...         ptest    = [chkthis for i in primes if chkthis%i == 0]
...         primes  += [] if ptest else [chkthis]
...         chkthis += 1
...     return primes
...
>>> print generate_n_primes(15)
[2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47]

Using generator expressions to create a sequence of all primes and slice the 100th out of that.

from itertools import count, islice
primes = (n for n in count(2) if all(n % d for d in range(2, n)))
print("100th prime is %d" % next(islice(primes, 99, 100)))
def isPrime(y):
  i=2
  while i < y:
    if y%i == 0 :
      return 0
      exit()
    i=i+1
  return 1

x= raw_input('Enter the position 1st,2nd,..nth prime number you are looking for?: ')
z=int(x)
# for l in range(2,z)
count = 1
n = 2
while count <= z:
  if isPrime(n) == 1:
    if count == z:
      print n
    count +=1
  n=n+1

You can take the number of prime number inputs. As per your method I have taken here a predefined count of 10:

i = 2
if i == 2:
    print(str(i) + "is a prime no")
    i = i+1
c=1

while c<10:
    for j in range(2, i):
        if i%j==0:
            break

    if i == j+1:
        print(str(i) + "is aa prime no")
        c=c+1

    i=i+1

This code is very confused, and I can't figure out exactly what you were thinking when you wrote it or what you were attempting to accomplish. The first thing I would suggest when trying to figure out how to code is to start by making your variable names extremely descriptive. This will help you get the ideas of what you're doing straight in your head, and it will also help anyone who's trying to help you show you how to get your ideas straight.

That being said, here is a sample program that accomplishes something close to the goal:

primewanted = int(input("This program will give you the nth prime.\nPlease enter n:"))
if primewanted <= 0:
    print "n must be >= 1"
else:
    lastprime = 2 # 2 is the very first prime number
    primesfound = 1  # Since 2 is the very first prime, we've found 1 prime
    possibleprime = lastprime + 1 # Start search for new primes right after
    while primesfound < primewanted:
        # Start at 2.  Things divisible by 1 might still be prime
        testdivisor = 2
        # Something is still possibly prime if it divided with a remainder.
        still_possibly_prime = ((possibleprime % testdivisor) != 0)
        # (testdivisor + 1) because we never want to divide a number by itself.
        while still_possibly_prime and ((testdivisor + 1) < possibleprime):
            testdivisor = testdivisor + 1
            still_possibly_prime = ((possibleprime % testdivisor) != 0)
        # If after all that looping the prime is still possibly prime,
        # then it is prime.
        if still_possibly_prime:
            lastprime = possibleprime
            primesfound = primesfound + 1
        # Go on ahead to see if the next number is prime
        possibleprime = possibleprime + 1
    print "This nth prime is:", lastprime

This bit of code:

        testdivisor = 2
        # Something is still possibly prime if it divided with a remainder.
        still_possibly_prime = ((possibleprime % testdivisor) != 0)
        # (testdivisor + 1) because we never want to divide a number by itself.
        while still_possibly_prime and ((testdivisor + 1) < possibleprime):
            testdivisor = testdivisor + 1
            still_possibly_prime = ((possibleprime % testdivisor) != 0)

could possibly be replaced by the somewhat slow, but possibly more understandable:

        # Assume the number is prime until we prove otherwise
        still_possibly_prime = True
        # Start at 2.  Things divisible by 1 might still be prime
        for testdivisor in xrange(2, possibleprime, 1):
            # Something is still possibly prime if it divided with a
            # remainder.  And if it is ever found to be not prime, it's not
            # prime, so never check again.
            if still_possibly_prime:
                still_possibly_prime = ((possibleprime % testdivisor) != 0)
  • You can make this more efficient if you replace the xrange with (2, (possibleprime // 2), 1) -- since there's no need to test divisors that are greater than half of the number. – Matt Howell Oct 27 '09 at 6:28
  • That's true, but I wanted to make it as straightforwardly obvious as possible. You can also do xrange(3, (possibleprime // 2), 2) and be even better. :-) – Omnifarious Oct 27 '09 at 6:33
n=int(input("Enter the number:: "))

for i in range(2,n):
    p=i
    k=0
    for j in range(2,p-1):
        if(p%j==0):
            k=k+1
    if(k==0):
        print(p)
  • Welcome to Stack Overflow! Rather than only post a block of code, please explain why this code solves the problem posed. Without an explanation, this is not an answer. – Martijn Pieters Oct 29 '12 at 8:51

This might help:

import sys
from time import time
def prime(N):
    M=100
    l=[]
    while len(l) < N:
        for i in range(M-100,M):    
            num = filter(lambda y :i % y == 0,(y for y in range(2 ,(i/2)))) 
            if not num and i not in [0,1,4]:
                l.append(i)
        M +=100
    return l[:N]


def dotime(func, n):
    print func.__name__
    start = time()
    print sorted(list(func(n))),len(list(func(n)))
    print 'Time in seconds: ' + str(time() - start)


if __name__ == "__main__":
    dotime(prime, int(sys.argv[1]))

Here's a simple recursive version:

import datetime
import math

def is_prime(n, div=2):
    if div> int(math.sqrt(n)): return True
    if n% div == 0:
        return False
    else:
        div+=1
        return is_prime(n,div)


now = datetime.datetime.now()

until = raw_input("How many prime numbers my lord desires??? ")
until = int(until)

primelist=[]
i=1;
while len(primelist)<until:
    if is_prime(i):
        primelist.insert(0,i)
        i+=1
    else: i+=1



print "++++++++++++++++++++"
print primelist
finish = datetime.datetime.now()
print "It took your computer", finish - now , "secs to calculate it"

Here's a version using a recursive function with memory!:

import datetime
import math

def is_prime(n, div=2):
    global primelist
    if div> int(math.sqrt(n)): return True
    if div < primelist[0]:
        div = primelist[0]
        for x in primelist:
            if x ==0 or x==1: continue
            if n % x == 0:
                return False
    if n% div == 0:
        return False
    else:
        div+=1
        return is_prime(n,div)


now = datetime.datetime.now()
print 'time and date:',now

until = raw_input("How many prime numbers my lord desires??? ")
until = int(until)

primelist=[]
i=1;
while len(primelist)<until:
    if is_prime(i):
        primelist.insert(0,i)
        i+=1
    else: i+=1



print "Here you go!"
print primelist

finish = datetime.datetime.now()
print "It took your computer", finish - now , " to calculate it"

Hope it helps :)

Try using while loop to check the count, that is easy. Find the code snippet below :

i=1
count = 0;
x = int(input("Enter the number:\n"))
while (count < x):
c=0
for j in range (1, (i+1), 1):
    a = i%j
    if (a==0):
        c = c+1

if (c==2):
      print (i)
      count = count+1
i=i+1

Whilst playing with prime numbers in Python V3 I noticed that the smallest number by which a composite(non-prime) number is divisible is itself always a prime that is less than the square root of the number under test.

Below is my implementation of that finding to calculate the first N prime numbers.

first 1,000 primes in 0.028S | first 10,000 primes in 0.6S | first 100,000 primes in 14.3S

The snippet below also indicates how long the generation took and prints out the primes in a nice table format.

import time
import math

def first_n_Primes(n):
    number_under_test = 4
    primes = [2,3]
    while len(primes) < n:
        check = False
        for prime in primes:
            if prime > math.sqrt(number_under_test) : break
            if number_under_test % prime == 0:
                check = True
                break
        if not check:
            for counter in range(primes[len(primes)-1],number_under_test-1,2):
                if number_under_test % counter == 0:
                    check = True
                    break
        if not check:
            primes.append(number_under_test)
        number_under_test+=1
    return primes

start_time = time.time()
data = first_n_Primes(1000)
end_time = time.time()

i = 1
while i < len(data)+1:
    print('{0: <9}'.format(str(data[i-1])), end="")
    if i%10 == 0: print("")
    i+=1

print("\nFirst %d primes took %s seconds ---" % (len(data),end_time - start_time))

This is my version

import timeit
import math

__author__ = 'rain'


primes = [2]

def is_prime(n):
    for prime in primes:
        if n % prime == 0:
            return False
    return True


def find_nth_prime(n):
    current_index = 0
    while(len(primes) < n):
        if current_index == 0:
            start_value = 3
            end_value = 2 * 2
        else:
            start_value = primes[current_index - 1] * primes[current_index - 1] + 1
            end_value = primes[current_index] * primes[current_index]
        for i in range(start_value, end_value):
            if is_prime(i):
                primes.append(i)
        current_index += 1
    return primes[n-1]


def solve():
    return find_nth_prime(10001)

print solve()

print timeit.timeit(solve, number=10)

I use a sieve to scan primes, it's quite quick

It's take only 3.8e-06 seconds to get 10001th prime (10 times).

Try this:

primeList = []
for num in range(2,10000):
    if all(num%i!=0 for i in range(2,num)):
        primeList.append(num)
x = int(raw_input("Enter n: "))
for i in range(x):
    print primeList[i]
max = input("enter the maximum limit to check prime number");
if max>1 :
    for i in range (2,max):
        prime=0;
        for j in range (2,i):
            if(i%j==0):
                prime=1;
                break
        if(prime==0 and i!=0):
            print(i,"is prime number");
else:
    print("prime no start from 2");
prime=2
counter = 0
x = int(input("Enter the number:\n"))
while (counter < x):
    if all(prime%j!=0 for j in range(2, prime)):
        print(prime, "is a prime number")
        counter+=1


    prime+=1
  • need some text to be added in answer to explain it – Vikrant Kashyap Sep 25 '17 at 7:27
count = -1
n = int(raw_input("how many primes you want starting from 2 "))
primes=[[]]*n
for p in range(2, n**2):
    for i in range(2, p):
        if p % i == 0:
            break
    else:
        count +=1
        primes[count]= p
        if count == n-1:
            break

print (primes)
print 'Done'

Anwer here is simple i.e run the loop 'n' times.

n=int(input())
count=0
i=2
while count<n:
    flag=0
    j=2
    while j<=int(i**0.5):
        if i%j==0:
            flag+=1
        j+=1
    if flag==0:
        print(i,end=" ")
        count+=1
    i+=1

I am not familiar with Python so I am writing the C counter part(too lazy to write pseudo code.. :P) To find the first n prime numbers.. // prints all the primes.. not bothering to make an array and return it etc..

void find_first_n_primes(int n){
   int count = 0;
   for(int i=2;count<=n;i++){
     factFlag == 0; //flag for factor count... 
     for(int k=2;k<sqrt(n)+1;k++){
       if(i%k == 0) // factor found..
        factFlag++;
     }
      if(factFlag==0)// no factors found hence prime..
        {
         Print(i);   // prime displayed..
         count++;
        }
   }
}

This might help:

def in_prime(n):
    p=True
    i=2
    if i**2<=n:
        if n%i==0:
            p=False
            break
    if (p):
        return n
  • It's not clear how generating, SyntaxError: 'break' outside loop might help. – cdlane Sep 25 '17 at 2:31
def Isprime(z):
    '''returns True if the number is prime OTW returns false'''
    if z<1:
        return False
    elif z==1:
        return False

    elif z==2:
        return True 

    else:
        for i in range(2,z):
            if z%i==0:
                return False
            else:
                return True

This is the way I did it. Of course, there are so many ways you can do it.

  • 1
    This code returns True for 21 (3 x 7) which isn't a prime. In fact, it returns True for odd numbers in general. – cdlane Sep 25 '17 at 2:25
  • make z to sqrt of z – Dinesh Saini Jul 30 at 7:26

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