2

I have the following classes:

TreeNode.cs

public class TreeNode : IEnumerable<TreeNode>
{
    public readonly Dictionary<string, TreeNode> _children = new Dictionary<string, TreeNode>();

    public readonly string Id;
    public TreeNode Parent { get; private set; }

    public TreeNode(string id)
    {
        this.Id = id;
    }

    public TreeNode GetChild(string id)
    {
        return this._childs[id];
    }

    public void Add(TreeNode item)
    {
        if (item.Parent != null)
        {
            item.Parent._childs.Remove(item.Id);
        }

        item.Parent = this;
        this._childs.Add(item.Id, item);
    }

    public IEnumerator<TreeNode> GetEnumerator()
    {
        return this._childs.Values.GetEnumerator();
    }

    IEnumerator IEnumerable.GetEnumerator()
    {
        return this.GetEnumerator();
    }

    public int Count
    {
        get { return this._childs.Count; }
    }
}

FolderStructureNode.cs

public class FolderStructureNode : TreeNode
{
    //Some properties such as FolderName, RelativePath etc.
}

So, when I have an object of type FolderStructureNode it is essentially a tree datastructure where each node represents a folder. I want to serialize this object into a JsonObject. I have tried both - JavaScriptSerializer and NewtonSoft. In both cases I get an output as -

[
  [
    []
  ],
  [
    []
  ],
  []
]

At the time of serialization, the tree looks something like this:

Tree

How do I serialize it in order to get the correct json object? Do I have to traverse the tree and create the json myself?

  • I think the serializer looks at the object's properties so try wrap the _childs dictionary in a property instead. – Christian Apr 30 '13 at 8:29
  • 1
    The problem is that your TreeNode class implements IEnumerable<TreeNode> so the serializer will serialize your node as an array (which is empty in your case). I can't tell why it's empty without seeing your IEnumerable implementation code. – fero Apr 30 '13 at 8:32
  • I have added the entire TreeNode class. – mridula Apr 30 '13 at 8:41
  • @Christian: Sorry, that did not help. – mridula Apr 30 '13 at 8:58
  • I just wrote an working answer about this on stackoverflow.com/questions/35275335/… – Arnaldo Perez Feb 23 at 19:22
1

As I said in my comment, your TreeNode class is serialized as an array because it implements IEnumerable<TreeNode>. So the only thing you will ever see when a TreeNode is serialized, are the children of a node. These children are (of course) also serialized as an array - down to the last leaf node. The leaf nodes don't have children and are therefore serialized as empty arrays. So that's why your JSON output looks like this.

You didn't exactly specify what JSON output you want to have, but I think what you want is like this:

{
    "Sales Order": { },
    "RFP":
    {
        "2169": { }
    },
    "Purchase Order":
    {
        "2216": { }
    }
}

To achieve this, your TreeNode class must be serialized as object. In my opinion (and assuming/suggesting you're using Newtonsoft Json.NET), you should write a custom converter class which might look like this:

class TreeNodeConverter : JsonConverter
{
    public override bool CanConvert(Type objectType)
    {
        // we can serialize everything that is a TreeNode
        return typeof(TreeNode).IsAssignableFrom(objectType);
    }

    public override object ReadJson(JsonReader reader, Type objectType, object existingValue, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        // we currently support only writing of JSON
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }

    public override void WriteJson(JsonWriter writer, object value, JsonSerializer serializer)
    {
        // we serialize a node by just serializing the _children dictionary
        var node = value as TreeNode;
        serializer.Serialize(writer, node._children);
    }
}

Then you have to decorate your TreeNode class with the JsonConverterAttribute so the serializer knows that it has to use your converter when serializing a TreeNode object.

[JsonConverter(typeof(TreeNodeConverter))]
public class TreeNode : IEnumerable<TreeNode>
{
    // ...
}

If you don't use Json.NET, I can't exactly tell you what to do but it might help if you would implement IDictionary instead of IEnumerable so the serializer knows you're dealing with key-value-pairs.

  • I simply removed IEnumerable, because it wasn't really required.. It worked now.. Thanks a lot! Although, I didn't understand why the objects inside the arrays weren't getting serialized. – mridula Apr 30 '13 at 10:08
  • They did get serialized. But they were serialized as an array containing the child nodes, which are also serialized as array and so on. So you won't get anything but arrays. The last children (leaf nodes) don't contain any children, so they're serialized as empty array. They can't be serialized as anything else (like the ID) because they must be arrays, too. – fero Apr 30 '13 at 10:49

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.