3

Consider:

#include <iostream> // Include header file

using namespace std;

int main () //start of main function
{

    int values[20]; // Declares array and how many elements
    int small, big; // Declares integer
    big = small = values[0]; // Assigns element to be highest or lowest value

    for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++) // Counts to 20 and prompts the user for a value and stores it
    {
        cout << "Enter value " << i << ": ";
        cin >> values[i];
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++) // Works out the biggest number
    {
        if(values[i] > big) // Compare biggest value with current element
        {
            big = values[i];
        }
    }

    for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++) // Works out the smallest number
    {
        if (values[i] < small) // Compares smallest value with current element
        {
            small = values[i];
        }
    }

    cout << "The biggest number is " << big << endl; // Prints outs the biggest number
    cout << "The smallest number is " << small << endl; // Prints out the smallest number
}

This is my code so far. The problem I am having is with it printing out the biggest number of the array. Something to do with assigning the first element to the highest and lowest value. It works if I do them separately. Any suggestions?

  • 9
    You know, I'm all for comments. But a comment like this //include header file is a hindrance. The person that will read or grade your work knows what an include directive does. – StoryTeller Apr 30 '13 at 11:39
  • big=small=values[0] Undefined behavior as the elements have not had a value defined. If you compile with warnings turned on the compiler will generate the appropiate error message: -Wall -Wexra -Werror – Martin York Apr 30 '13 at 12:52
  • 1
    @StoryTeller, as well as many other comments: //start of main fcn, //delcares array and how many elements, //declares integer... – Shoe Apr 30 '13 at 13:16
10

Unless you really must implement your own solution, you can use std::minmax_element. This returns a pair of iterators, one to the smallest element and one to the largest.

#include <algorithm>

auto minmax = std::minmax_element(std::begin(values), std::end(values));

std::cout << "min element " << *(minmax.first) << "\n";
std::cout << "max element " << *(minmax.second) << "\n";
  • Also note that minmax_element minimizes the number of comparisons required, so it is still faster than a naive hand-written loop if comparison is expensive. – ComicSansMS Apr 30 '13 at 13:14
5
big=small=values[0]; //assigns element to be highest or lowest value

Should be AFTER fill loop

//counts to 20 and prompts user for value and stores it
for ( int i = 0; i < 20; i++ )
{
    cout << "Enter value " << i << ": ";
    cin >> values[i];
}
big=small=values[0]; //assigns element to be highest or lowest value

since when you declare array - it's unintialized (store some undefined values) and so, your big and small after assigning would store undefined values too.

And of course, you can use std::min_element, std::max_element, or std::minmax_element from C++11, instead of writing your loops.

  • To add to this. By assigning big and small before filling the array you're assigning undefined values which may end up being stored as arbitrarily high or low numbers. This could end up giving you incorrect results in your output. – Boumbles Apr 30 '13 at 11:39
  • thanks for the help, could you explain why – user2204993 Apr 30 '13 at 11:39
2
int main () //start of main fcn
{

    int values[ 20 ]; //delcares array and how many elements
    int small,big; //declares integer
     for ( int i = 0; i < 20; i++ ) //counts to 20 and prompts user for value and stores it
    {
        cout << "Enter value " << i << ": ";
        cin >> values[i];
    }
    big=small=values[0]; //assigns element to be highest or lowest value
    for (int i = 0; i < 20; i++) //works out bigggest number
    {
        if(values[i]>big) //compare biggest value with current element
        {
            big=values[i];
        }
         if(values[i]<small) //compares smallest value with current element
        {
            small=values[i];
        }
    }
     cout << "The biggest number is " << big << endl; //prints outs biggest no
    cout << "The smallest number is " << small << endl; //prints out smalles no
}
1

You assign to big and small before the array is initialized, i.e., big and small assume the value of whatever is on the stack at this point. As they are just plain value types and no references, they won't assume a new value once values[0] is written to via cin >>.

Just move the assignment after your first loop and it should be fine.

0

You can initialize after filling the array or you can write:

 small =~ unsigned(0)/2; // Using the bit-wise complement to flip 0's bits and dividing by 2 because unsigned can hold twice the +ve value an

integer can hold.

 big =- 1*(small) - 1;

instead of:

big = small = values[0]

because when you write this line before filling the array, big and small values will equal to a random leftover value (as integer is a POD) from the memory and if those numbers are either bigger or smaller than any other value in you array, you will get them as an output.

  • 2
    I can see someone is into obfuscation. – James Kanze Apr 30 '13 at 14:34
  • 1
    Don't you think it would be smarter to use std::numeric_limits? – Blastfurnace Apr 30 '13 at 14:48
  • Well,sorry about that but I wanted to point this method out and I tried to make it clear as possible. – M.A Apr 30 '13 at 14:59
  • @Blastfurnace Well, it is the more elegant way to do it but for a user with a little experience he might try to use 32-bit climits header for a 64-bit stage and I saw such case and as it defined as follow in the header: #define INT_MAX 2147483647(it depends on OS) so he would get a wrong max but the above method make sure that – M.A May 1 '13 at 3:06

protected by Community Dec 30 '15 at 21:18

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