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Is there an objective definition? Is it implemented as a fragment of python's source code? If so, could someone produce the exact code lines? Have all languages with, say, a 'for' statement iterator protocols of their own?

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    docs.python.org/3/reference/…
    – Hal Canary
    Apr 30, 2013 at 13:40
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    Most languages don't implement Python-like for statements (which are really best described as "foreach"). The C-standard for(init,cond,incr) is nothing like Python's for loop. Apr 30, 2013 at 14:07

1 Answer 1

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It's located here in the docs:

One method needs to be defined for container objects to provide iteration support:

container.__iter__()

Return an iterator object. The object is required to support the iterator protocol described below. If a container supports different types of iteration, additional methods can be provided to specifically request iterators for those iteration types. (An example of an object supporting multiple forms of iteration would be a tree structure which supports both breadth-first and depth-first traversal.) This method corresponds to the tp_iter slot of the type structure for Python objects in the Python/C API.

The iterator objects themselves are required to support the following two methods, which together form the iterator protocol:

iterator.__iter__()

Return the iterator object itself. This is required to allow both containers and iterators to be used with the for and in statements. This method corresponds to the tp_iter slot of the type structure for Python objects in the Python/C API.

iterator.__next__()

Return the next item from the container. If there are no further items, raise the StopIteration exception. This method corresponds to the tp_iternext slot of the type structure for Python objects in the Python/C API.

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    Also next is __next__ in py3
    – Kos
    Apr 30, 2013 at 13:52
  • The iterator protocol also allows Python to infer an iterator using container.__getitem__ if __iter__ is not defined.
    – chepner
    Mar 25, 2022 at 14:08
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    Technically, an iterable defines __iter__ to return an iterator; it's the iterator that defines __next__. (A common example is list, which is an iterable whose __iter__ method returns an instance of list_iterator to act as an iterator for the list. There is no list.__next__ method, only list_iterator.__next__.)
    – chepner
    Mar 25, 2022 at 14:10

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