I am relatively new to c and the Raspberry Pi and am trying simple programs. What I would like is when the button is pressed it printfs once and doesn't printf again until the button is pressed again, even if the button is held down (sort of a latch). I thought maybe adding the second while loop in would fix this, but sometimes it still doesn't detect a button press.

#include <bcm2835.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#define PIN RPI_GPIO_P1_11

int main()
{
    if(!bcm2835_init())
        return 1;

    bcm2835_gpio_fsel(PIN, BCM2835_GPIO_FSEL_INPT);

    while(1)
    {
        if(bcm2835_gpio_lev(PIN))
        {
            printf("The button has been pressed\n");
        }

       while(bcm2835_gpio_lev(PIN)){}
    }

    bcm2835_close();
    return 0;
}
  • 3
    You might find a google search for 'button debouncing' to be helpful. – Carl Norum Apr 30 '13 at 18:49
  • 2
    Its all about knowing what the technical term so I can look it up. Thank you – Marmstrong Apr 30 '13 at 19:06
  • Happy to help - I didn't think it warranted an answer, but having the right term to search really helps out sometimes! – Carl Norum Apr 30 '13 at 20:11
up vote 1 down vote accepted

For a simple program like this, using busy loops like you've done is fine. However, I'd suggest getting out of the habit because it's often unacceptable in anything more than a toy project.

There are as many ways to debounce a button as there are people writing code. Doing it in hardware may be the way to go in some cases, but it's not without its drawbacks. In any case, since this is a programming site, let's assume you can't (or don't want to) change the hardware.

A quick and dirty modification is to periodically check the button in the main loop and only act if it has changed. Since you're new to C and and embedded programming, I'll avoid timers and interrupts, but know that you can make the code more understandable and maintainable once you learn about them.

#include <bcm2835.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#define PIN RPI_GPIO_P1_11

// A decent value for the number of checks varies with how "clean" your button is, how 
// responsive you need the system to be, and how often you call the helper function. That
// last one depends on how fast your CPU is and how much other stuff is going on in your
// loop. Don't pick a value above UINT_MAX (in limits.h)
#define BUTTON_DEBOUNCE_CHECKS 100

int ButtonPress()
{
    static unsigned int buttonState = 0;
    static char buttonPressEnabled = 1;

    if(bcm2835_gpio_lev(PIN))
    {
        if(buttonState < BUTTON_DEBOUNCE_CHECKS)
        {
            buttonState++;
        }
        else if(buttonPressEnabled)
        {
            buttonPressEnabled = 0;
            return 1;
        }
    }
    else if(buttonState > 0 )
    {
        buttonState--;
        // alternatively you can set buttonState to 0 here, but I prefer this way
    }
    else
    {
        buttonPressEnabled = 1;
    }

    return 0;
}

int main()
{
    if(!bcm2835_init())
        return 1;

    bcm2835_gpio_fsel(PIN, BCM2835_GPIO_FSEL_INPT);

    while(1)
    {
        if(ButtonPress())
        {
            printf("The button has been pressed\n");
        }

        // the rest of your main loop code
    }

    bcm2835_close();
    return 0;
}
  • I tried implementing this bit of code. There still was a bit of bounce so I changed the "BUTTON_DEBOUNCE_CHECKS". I found a good value was about 300 (my button probably isn't that "clean"). More often than not it was releasing the button that caused the bounce. (Also tried "BUTTON_DEBOUNCE_CHECKS" = 5000 for fun, noticeable lag but no bounce). Are the hardware solutions more reliable?? Thanks for your help! – Marmstrong Apr 30 '13 at 21:19
  • The problem with this solution is that the value needed for BUTTON_DEBOUNCE_CHECKS not only depends on the characteristics of the switch, but also the speed for processor, and the execution time of the "rest of your main look code". It also "busy-waits" - with no other blocking call in the main loop the CPU usage will go to 100%, ans starve other processes causing a sluggish system overall. If you want to be able to do other work while monitoring for a button press it might be better to use a separate thread with a usleep() call to keep CPU load minimal. – Clifford May 1 '13 at 19:01
  • I absolutely agree about the fragile nature of the BUTTON_DEBOUNCE_CHECKS value and said as much in both the text and code. However, I felt it better to avoid too much discussion about timers, interrupts, and scheduling for someone just learning about debouncing. I disagree about the code busy waiting. There's nothing preventing the "rest of the code" from yielding or sleeping. As written, it will suck up all the processor cycles only if it's a purely cooperative multitasking OS or there are no other tasks. I'm not familiar enough with Raspberry Pi to know what RTOS it uses (if any). – jerry May 1 '13 at 21:13
  • @Clifford as for usleep(), the benefit will be greatly diminished or eliminated if there aren't any other runnable tasks (okay, it may help power draw and associated heat generation in some systems). This is a very simple test program, the OP may not plan on ever extending it to run with other tasks. It will definitely block the calling thread, though more politely than a crude spin-wait. Even if you do it in a seperate thread, your main thread would still need to yield or sleep, which as I said can already be done. By the way, does this mean the Raspberry Pi OS is POSIX compliant? – jerry May 1 '13 at 21:26
  • @Marmstrong If your button if very asymmetric, you could use different debounce lengths for each direction. Hardware can have the same sort of problem with finding a suitable compromise between response and debounce. It also takes up board space, affects per-unit cost, and is less flexible. Unlike software, you can't remotely change hardware [well, maybe an FPGA, if you consider that hardware :) ]. However, it does take the workload off your MCU and you can even put the button on an interrupt pin (if there are any), which may allow you go into a low power mode and resume on button press. – jerry May 1 '13 at 21:44

Your logic is correct and this would work if buttons were perfect. But they aren't. You have to debounce the signal of the button. Two methods to achieve that (works best when combined):

I. Add a capacitor between the two pins of the button (or try an even more sophisticated button debouncer circuitry), and/or

II. use software debouncing (pseudo-C):

while (1) {
    while (!button_pressed)
        ;

    printf("Button pressed!\n");


    while (elapsed_time < offset)
        ;
}

etc.

Edit: as @jerry pointed out, the above doesn't work "correctly" when the button is held. Here are a couple of more professional code snippets you can use to meet all the requirements.

  • If the button is held, this code will repeat the printf indefinitely – jerry Apr 30 '13 at 19:14
  • @jerry That's right. Added that, as well as a link to better alternatives. – user529758 Apr 30 '13 at 19:18
  • If you changed while (elapsed_time < offset) to while (elapsed_time < offset || button_pressed) it would solve that particular problem – jerry May 1 '13 at 1:47

The following function polls the button at nominally 1 millisecond intervals and required that the state remain "releases" to 20 consecutive polls. That will typically be sufficient to debounce most switches while retaining responsiveness.

Replace your while(bcm2835_gpio_lev(PIN)){} loop with a call to waitButtonRelease().

#include <unistd.h>
#define DEBOUNCE_MILLISEC 20

void waitButtonRelease()
{
    int debounce = 0 ;

    while( debounce < DEBOUNCE_MILLISEC )
    {
        usleep(1000) ;

        if( bcm2835_gpio_lev(PIN) )
        {
            debounce = 0 ;
        }
        else
        {
            debounce++ ; 
        }
    }
}

You may find it necessary also to debounce button presses as well as releases. That is done in the same way, but counting the opposite state:

void waitButtonPress()
{
    int debounce = 0 ;

    while( debounce < DEBOUNCE_MILLISEC )
    {
        usleep(1000) ;

        if( !bcm2835_gpio_lev(PIN) )
        {
            debounce = 0 ;
        }
        else
        {
            debounce++ ; 
        }
    }
}

Or perhaps a single function to debounce either state:

#include <stdbool.h>

void waitButton( bool state )
{
    int debounce = 0 ;

    while( debounce < DEBOUNCE_MILLISEC )
    {
        usleep(1000) ;

        if( bcm2835_gpio_lev(PIN) == state )
        {
            debounce++ ;
        }
        else
        {
            debounce = 0 ; 
        }
    }
}

Given this last function, your main while loop might look like:

    while(1)
    {
        waitButton( true )
        printf("The button has been pressed\n");

        waitButton( false ) ;
    }

If you have access to a digital storage oscilloscope, you might probe the switch signal directly to see exactly what the switch bounce looks like. It may help you understand the problem and also to tailor the debounce to the characteristics of your particular switch.

  • The usleep(1000) call should be inside the while loop. Otherwise you're not going to do much debouncing. – jerry Apr 30 '13 at 20:07
  • @Jerry: Good spot - thanks. – Clifford May 1 '13 at 8:29

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